Obscure glass


B

Brian Drury

The recent relaxation of loft conversion permitted development
stipulates the requirement for side-facing windows to be
obscure-glazed.

Is there a definition for the required degree of obscurity? Also,
which way is it supposed to work? Can I fit one-way glass so that
nobody can see in?

Brian
 
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B

BigWallop

Brian Drury said:
The recent relaxation of loft conversion permitted development
stipulates the requirement for side-facing windows to be
obscure-glazed.

Is there a definition for the required degree of obscurity? Also,
which way is it supposed to work? Can I fit one-way glass so that
nobody can see in?

Brian
The glass only has be obscured if it faces adjacent neighbouring dwellings
at a certain distance. It's to stop you both perving at each other. It was
argued that blinds or curtains would also obscure the window from peeping
in, but the argument was lost when the lawyers asked " And what about you
looking out through the curtains". :)
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

Andy said:
More than likely specified so you can't peer out, rather than worrying
about others peering at you!
Just put a CCTV outside instead. Everyone else does. ;-)
Doesn't "one way" glass only work when the side to be observed is bright
and the side you are observing from is dark?
yes.
 
G

Graham.

Brian Drury said:
The recent relaxation of loft conversion permitted development
stipulates the requirement for side-facing windows to be
obscure-glazed.

Is there a definition for the required degree of obscurity? Also,
which way is it supposed to work? Can I fit one-way glass so that
nobody can see in?

Brian
I'm missing some thing here. What's so special about a window in a loft
conversion compared with a window elsewhere in the house wrt
Peeping Tomery.
 
B

Brian Drury

The glass only has be obscured if it faces adjacent neighbouring dwellings
at a certain distance. It's to stop you both perving at each other. It was
argued that blinds or curtains would also obscure the window from peeping
in, but the argument was lost when the lawyers asked " And what about you
looking out through the curtains". :)
Do you happen to know where the distance is defined?

Locally, when planning is involved, the distance where obscured glass
is stipulated can be over one hundred feet.

In this instance planning will not be involved therefore I simply have
to identify and meet the statutory requirement. But where is it
defined?
 
B

BigWallop

Brian Drury said:
Do you happen to know where the distance is defined?

Locally, when planning is involved, the distance where obscured glass
is stipulated can be over one hundred feet.

In this instance planning will not be involved therefore I simply have
to identify and meet the statutory requirement. But where is it
defined?
It would be better going to your local authority web site and have a look at
their planning formats. I thought there was a standard somewhere, something
like 72 feet (22 metres), but I think different regions have their own
principal of calculation. I also recall somewhere has it at the same
distance for the eyesight test for a driving license at 65 feet (20 metres),
but that has probably changed as well now.

You can buy a frosted film to cover the glass, which creates the desired
effect. I suppose it could be removed after consent has been granted on the
refurb'.
 
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B

BigWallop

Graham. said:
I'm missing some thing here. What's so special about a window in a loft
conversion compared with a window elsewhere in the house wrt
Peeping Tomery.

Graham.
It is in regard to preventing peeping tomery. Adjacent properties have the
right to privacy, and to stop near by buildings from being able to look into
your property, the planning consent needs to know that you are not a
pervert, or for you to have any glass obscured to stop even accidental
perving. It also helps prevent others from perving into your rooms when
you're in a state of romantic embarrassment. :)
 
G

Graham.

BigWallop said:
It is in regard to preventing peeping tomery. Adjacent properties have
the
right to privacy, and to stop near by buildings from being able to look
into
your property, the planning consent needs to know that you are not a
pervert, or for you to have any glass obscured to stop even accidental
perving. It also helps prevent others from perving into your rooms when
you're in a state of romantic embarrassment. :)
I'd gathered that much, please re-read my question.
 
B

BigWallop

Graham. said:
I'd gathered that much, please re-read my question.

Graham.
Oh right. It's a gable end window. Gables are more often built adjacent to
each other. Dormer windows don't fall under this situation.
 
B

boltmail

I'm missing some thing here. What's so special about a window in a loft
conversion compared with a window elsewhere in the house wrt
Peeping Tomery.
Nothing, but they would impose the same restriction if a planning
application was made for any other development, so it isn't being
treated any differently, this way it just comes along with the deemed
consent.
 
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B

BigWallop

Oh right. It's a gable end window.
Where do you get that from?

I hope he's talking about a gable end window. Surely he can't think that
all loft windows have to be frosted or turned to angle to prevent
overlooking? Maybe he is talking all the loft windows. :)

That's what we get for assuming. LOL
 
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B

Brian Drury

Where do you get that from?

I hope he's talking about a gable end window. Surely he can't think that
all loft windows have to be frosted or turned to angle to prevent
overlooking? Maybe he is talking all the loft windows. :)

That's what we get for assuming. LOL
He was talking about the new reg's that can be seen here:
http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/england/genpub/en/1115315235153.html

Bullet point 7 is the one:
"Side-facing windows to be obscure-glazed; any opening to be
1.7m above the floor."

My plan is to gable end the existing hip at the back of the building
and add a dorma to the side. The side view would be facing south
towards the sea about 1 mile away. Being on a hill the view will be
great but difficult to appreciate through frosted glass.

Hence my interest in the required degree of opacity.

Brian
 

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