New Slab Flaws - Serious Problem?


T

tapedude

The (post tension) slab on our new house was poured this week and today
we noticed a flaw that we are concerned about.

The hot water lines are plastic and enclosed in foam in the slab. At 2
places the foam is apparently very near the surface of the slab and in
one of these places the slab has cracked and you can actually feel the
foam covering the water line through the slab at one place (for about
2'-3' in length).

We are going to point this out to our builder tomorrow but I'd like to
have some idea if this is a serious problem.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Phil Scott

--
Phil Scott
Ideas are bullet proof.
The (post tension) slab on our new house was poured this
week and today
we noticed a flaw that we are concerned about.

The hot water lines are plastic and enclosed in foam in the
slab. At 2
places the foam is apparently very near the surface of the
slab and in
one of these places the slab has cracked and you can
actually feel the
foam covering the water line through the slab at one place
(for about
2'-3' in length).

We are going to point this out to our builder tomorrow but
I'd like to
have some idea if this is a serious problem.

Thanks in advance.

Its only slightly shoddy if thats all you notice...cracks in
slabs are unavoidable. If the rest of his work is OK this is
just an anomaly. It these sorts of things keep occuring in
volume then you have something to worry about.



Phil Scott
 
F

frippletoot

The (post tension) slab on our new house was poured this week and today
we noticed a flaw that we are concerned about.

The hot water lines are plastic and enclosed in foam in the slab. At 2
places the foam is apparently very near the surface of the slab and in
one of these places the slab has cracked and you can actually feel the
foam covering the water line through the slab at one place (for about
2'-3' in length).

We are going to point this out to our builder tomorrow but I'd like to
have some idea if this is a serious problem.

Thanks in advance.
All new houses should have expert inspections during construction.
Even if builders in your area are legally bound by building codes,
they're not well enforced, and codes are only a minimum standard,
perhaps below what you are paying for. Before things get any further,
take photos and arrange for a competent inspection by someone
knowledgeable about structural problems, etc.

I don't know how that's done in your state, but in mine both home
inspectors and engineers have to be licensed so that's a place to
start. Also, in my state, code violations are routinely overlooked by
the city.

I have no idea if what you describe is of any concern, but having been
through a construction defect case, I do know that documentation is
very important. We didn't see our house during construction, it was
done when we first saw it. You have the ability to get mistakes
discovered and fixed before closing and I recommend you take advantage
of it. If you close on a house with defects you are in for a very long
and expensive battle. Even if your experts find nothing wrong, at
least you have the comfort of that knowledge. I would not build again
without good inspections during construction. Hope it all works out.
 
P

Phil Scott

All new houses should have expert inspections during
construction.
Even if builders in your area are legally bound by building
codes,
they're not well enforced, and codes are only a minimum
standard,
perhaps below what you are paying for. Before things get
any further,
take photos and arrange for a competent inspection by
someone
knowledgeable about structural problems, etc.

I don't know how that's done in your state, but in mine both
home
inspectors and engineers have to be licensed so that's a
place to
start. Also, in my state, code violations are routinely
overlooked by
the city.

I have no idea if what you describe is of any concern, but
having been
through a construction defect case, I do know that
documentation is
very important. We didn't see our house during
construction, it was
done when we first saw it. You have the ability to get
mistakes
discovered and fixed before closing and I recommend you take
advantage
of it. If you close on a house with defects you are in for
a very long
and expensive battle. Even if your experts find nothing
wrong, at
least you have the comfort of that knowledge. I would not
build again
without good inspections during construction. Hope it all
works out.
thats good advice.... however some experts like to cover their
ass and make a big deal about every little thing... the owner
thinks thats a good deal.... the contractor simply doubles his
price...all because of the nit picking.

you should have a clear understanding with your building
professional on that issue as well.

also in this area we have a lot of ex used car salesman
kiddies who 'took the building inspection course' at the local
diploma mill...and is now a 'building expert'...with no
clooo.. but with real good salesman skills.... those can do
you more harm than good also... mainly by nit picking the
cosmetic sorts of issues and missing major structural issues
that take real brains to understand.

Phil Scott
 
M

m Ransley

Id be pissed you have no concrete thickness in that area you know. So
its thin for a longer stretch and will crack away with time and pressure
on it. If you see foam how thick could it be 6" or 12" or 2 feet away.
There is a minimum you need and in that area you dont have zip. Call the
inspector.
 
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Phil Scott

m Ransley said:
Id be pissed you have no concrete thickness in that area you
know. So
its thin for a longer stretch and will crack away with time
and pressure
on it. If you see foam how thick could it be 6" or 12" or 2
feet away.
There is a minimum you need and in that area you dont have
zip. Call the
inspector.

You see.... thats correct.

Also there is no doubt AIR BUBBLES... that WEAKEN the
slab...and ROUGH SPOTS...that will RAISE the linoleum... and
DUST.... dont forget the DUST...that could get onto something
and RUIN IT.... also CRACKS.... the slab could CRACK in
half and one half could go north with the pacific plate and
other could so SOUTH with the south american plate and you
would have to be BI LINGUAL to speak with your wife.... not to
mention TOO MUCH WATER in the mix... no slump... the whole
thing could DISOLVE and sink into the ground water table and
be drawn away into everyones faucett..

then what would you have NOTHING.

accordingly the entire house should be torn down and the slab
REPOURED... no way in hell can we have a FLAW.


Phil Scott
 

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