Most heat resistant counter top?


D

Don Wiss

I like white Corian counters to work on. Corian doesn't win the heat
resistance award. The cabinet box that will be alongside the range is
12-1/4" wide. I could give that section a stone countertop, and somehow
have it meet nicely with the Corian. That box could have a lower height to
match the surface with the 1/2" thick Corian.

It seems that granite is the most heat resistant. Or is there some rare
stone or other material known for its heat resistance? I would think that
the thicker the more resistant. Are there thicker countertop thickness
options?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
 
Ad

Advertisements

P

Pete C.

Don said:
I like white Corian counters to work on. Corian doesn't win the heat
resistance award. The cabinet box that will be alongside the range is
12-1/4" wide. I could give that section a stone countertop, and somehow
have it meet nicely with the Corian. That box could have a lower height to
match the surface with the 1/2" thick Corian.

It seems that granite is the most heat resistant. Or is there some rare
stone or other material known for its heat resistance? I would think that
the thicker the more resistant. Are there thicker countertop thickness
options?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Stainless steel?
 
D

Don Wiss

Stainless steel?
Could be. You wouldn't see the wood underneath being scorched. As long as
it doesn't get odoriferous when the wood heats up. Too bad I can't put a
layer of asbestos under the stainless. Or is there something else that goes
in between?

Having Corian and stainless steel join together...

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
 
P

Pete C.

Don said:
Could be. You wouldn't see the wood underneath being scorched. As long as
it doesn't get odoriferous when the wood heats up. Too bad I can't put a
layer of asbestos under the stainless. Or is there something else that goes
in between?
Stainless usually doesn't have a backer. You could back it with regular
cement board if you wanted.
 
P

Pete C.

Don said:
Maybe the answer is tile? Porcelain or ceramic?
Grout lines - bad, a pain to clean and seal, tile isn't generally flat
so stuff doesn't always sit on them well, and it's also very much out of
style for kitchen counters.
 
Ad

Advertisements

K

krw

Maybe the answer is tile? Porcelain or ceramic?
Trivet? Just lay a hunk of tile or stone on top of the Corian, if you
like it better than all stone. SWMBO would never have anything other
than granite, or perhaps quartz, again. Corian for the bathroom,
maybe, but not the kitchen.
 
D

Don Wiss

Grout lines - bad, a pain to clean and seal, tile isn't generally flat
so stuff doesn't always sit on them well, and it's also very much out of
style for kitchen counters.
On this page the unglazed porcelain tile comes in 14" squares:
http://www.crossvilleinc.com/contract/products/porcelain_stone/empire

That countertop would be 28" x 12-1/4", so only a single grout line. And
only one place for unevenness.

I don't care what is in style. If I did, I wouldn't be installing Designer
White Corian.

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
 
M

micky

I like white Corian counters to work on. Corian doesn't win the heat
resistance award. The cabinet box that will be alongside the range is
12-1/4" wide. I could give that section a stone countertop, and somehow
have it meet nicely with the Corian. That box could have a lower height to
match the surface with the 1/2" thick Corian.

It seems that granite is the most heat resistant. Or is there some rare
stone or other material known for its heat resistance? I would think that
the thicker the more resistant. Are there thicker countertop thickness
options?
Diamond. Make the counter out of diamond.
 
M

micky

Stainless steel is probably the most practical counter top. Virtually
all commercial kitchens use stainless steel food preparation surfaces.

Granite is an igneous rock, and as such is extremely heat resistant.

Everyone wants a ceramic tile counter top until they have one. The
problem is that dirt collects in the grout lines, and so they're harder
to keep clean than any counter top that offers a continuous smooth flat
surface.

Probably the most durable and attractive counter top would be granite.

Probably the most practical counter top would be stainless steel.
I'd want to see a stainless counter that was 10 years old. For
deocratoin and surfaces that don't get used, it's great, but wouldn't
it get beat up. in use. The bottom of my sink doesn't look so good,
afaicr.
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

clare

Could be. You wouldn't see the wood underneath being scorched. As long as
it doesn't get odoriferous when the wood heats up. Too bad I can't put a
layer of asbestos under the stainless. Or is there something else that goes
in between?

Having Corian and stainless steel join together...

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
Comercial stainless steel counter tops do not have anything
underneath them except air.. And they are EXTREMELY heat resistant..

If you need to put it over wood, put some ceramic heat blanket like
used on aircraft firewalls - One brand is Fiberfax.- between the wood
and the stainless.
 
C

clare

Comercial stainless steel counter tops do not have anything
underneath them except air.. And they are EXTREMELY heat resistant..

If you need to put it over wood, put some ceramic heat blanket like
used on aircraft firewalls - One brand is Fiberfax.- between the wood
and the stainless.
Make that Fiberfrax.
 
C

clare

I'd want to see a stainless counter that was 10 years old. For
deocratoin and surfaces that don't get used, it's great, but wouldn't
it get beat up. in use. The bottom of my sink doesn't look so good,
afaicr.
Virtually every commercial kitchen has stainless steel counter tops.
Not necessarilly pretty, but very durable.
 
K

krw

Stainless steel is probably the most practical counter top. Virtually
all commercial kitchens use stainless steel food preparation surfaces.

Granite is an igneous rock, and as such is extremely heat resistant.

Everyone wants a ceramic tile counter top until they have one. The
problem is that dirt collects in the grout lines, and so they're harder
to keep clean than any counter top that offers a continuous smooth flat
surface.

Probably the most durable and attractive counter top would be granite.

Probably the most practical counter top would be stainless steel.
Granite, or other similar stone, is best for a kitchen. The high
thermal mass makes them great for baking and things like candy.
Stainless, not so much.
 
K

krw

I'd want to see a stainless counter that was 10 years old. For
deocratoin and surfaces that don't get used, it's great, but wouldn't
it get beat up. in use. The bottom of my sink doesn't look so good,
afaicr.
There are stainless cleaners that will keep a stainless sink looking
new.
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

gregz

micky said:
Diamond. Make the counter out of diamond.
Unfortunately, the heat would be transferred to the substrate. Diamond is
many times better conductor than copper.

Greg
 
D

Don Wiss

Granite, or other similar stone, is best for a kitchen. The high
thermal mass makes them great for baking and things like candy.
Stainless, not so much.
There is no one best for the kitchen. Granite has plenty of negatives.

This thread is not on what is best for the kitchen. It is on what is the
most heat resistant counter. This because my counters will be Corian and
that isn't very heat resistant. Since I can put 12-1/4" of something else
alongside the stove I'd like to do it. Just what else at this spot is the
question.

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
 
F

Fake ID

I like white Corian counters to work on. Corian doesn't win the heat
resistance award. The cabinet box that will be alongside the range is
12-1/4" wide. I could give that section a stone countertop, and somehow
have it meet nicely with the Corian. That box could have a lower height to
match the surface with the 1/2" thick Corian.

It seems that granite is the most heat resistant. Or is there some rare
stone or other material known for its heat resistance? I would think that
the thicker the more resistant. Are there thicker countertop thickness
options?

Don. www.donwiss.com (e-mail link at home page bottom).
With just the one requirement the answer is obvious...
Asbestos

m
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

trader4

Diamond.  Make the counter out of diamond.

LOL. I think you're thinking what I'm thinking. What
difference does it make which material is the "most"
heat resistant? All you need is a material that is
heat resistant enough so that you can put a typical
hot pot on it. Beyond that, who cares? Are you
going to do welding on it? And granite
is certainly heat resistant enough for counter tops.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

Counter tops 1
counter tops 2
Formica counter tops 1
Top 5 Most Dangerous Tools, 65
Outlets in Counter Tops 4
concrete counter tops 2
Silestone Counter Tops 9
Counter top laminate 0

Top