Make your own lightbulb "kits"


G

generic.homeowner

Here's an idea for the furture. Beginning on January 1, 2012, the
stores wont be able to sell 100w incandescent light bulbs. But what
about kits to make your own. It dont say anything in the new
regulations about "kits", just the finished ready to use bulbs will be
banned.

The kits will come in two levels.

The first level will include the blown glass bulb complete with the
filament enclosed. You will just have to solder and glue the threaded
base to the bulb.

The second level will require the purchaser to construct the entire
bulb from raw materials.

This will not only be educational, but will furnish the average guy
something to do on their weekends to avoid boredom while watching
sports on tv. This will also save the average guy a fair amount of
money. Rather than spending money of things such as traveling, going
to bars, wilderness adventures, going to movies, sporting events,
dining, and and other things people waste their money doing on
weekends, they will instead spend all their free time making
lightbulbs for their homes. This is a project the whole family will
enjoy doing at the dining room table, using candles to see in the dark
evening hours during the winter holidays.

Isn't America great!
 
H

hr(bob) hofmann

Here's an idea for the furture.  Beginning on January 1, 2012, the
stores wont be able to sell 100w incandescent light bulbs.  But what
about kits to make your own.  It dont say anything in the new
regulations about "kits", just the finished ready to use bulbs will be
banned.

The kits will come in two levels.

The first level will include the blown glass bulb complete with the
filament enclosed.  You will just have to solder and glue the threaded
base to the bulb.

The second level will require the purchaser to construct the entire
bulb from raw materials.

This will not only be educational, but will furnish the average guy
something to do on their weekends to avoid boredom while watching
sports on tv.  This will also save the average guy a fair amount of
money.  Rather than spending money of things such as traveling, going
to bars, wilderness adventures, going to movies, sporting events,
dining, and and other things people waste their money doing on
weekends, they will instead spend all their free time making
lightbulbs for their homes.  This is a project the whole family will
enjoy doing at the dining room table, using candles to see in the dark
evening hours during the winter holidays.

Isn't America great!
I like option # 1.
 
T

Tegger

(e-mail address removed) wrote in
will furnish the average guy
something to do on their weekends


You must be a homo.

A "guy" is not a "they", a "guy" is a "HE".

Politically-correct grade-school bucket-fillers are "they", and may not
even possess penises.
 
H

hr(bob) hofmann

Too bad, GE now sells 90w incandescent bulbs that put out more lumens
than the old style 100w...and they have a greater life span as well.
haven't seen them locally yet
 
K

krw

I have close to that, though they're 60W clear. I have a house full of
fixtures that want 60W clear bulbs (only two 100W frosted, in the garage door
opener, IIRC).
Too bad, GE now sells 90w incandescent bulbs that put out more lumens
than the old style 100w...and they have a greater life span as well.
Rather irrelevant. I wouldn't have more than a dozen if Congress hadn't stuck
their nose where it doesn't belong.
 
T

Tomsic

Jack Hammer said:
Too bad, GE now sells 90w incandescent bulbs that put out more lumens than
the old style 100w...and they have a greater life span as well.
Nice. I personally like the GE product and the price is about the same as
the old standard bulb. But the 90 watt doesn't meet the requirements that
kick in 1/1/12. They say that the max bulb wattage has to be 72 watts with
an output range of 1490-2600 lumens.

Tomsic
 
P

pseudonym

hr(bob) hofmann@att.net said:
haven't seen them locally yet
Walmart has them...at least my local one does...but after using led bulbs
for a couple months now, the incandescents are pointless/wasteful
 
G

generic.homeowner

Walmart has them...at least my local one does...but after using led bulbs
for a couple months now, the incandescents are pointless/wasteful
Obviously you must be a wealthy doctor or lawyer to be able to afford
LED bulbs. Either that, or you used your life savings to buy them,
and will have no savings left for retirement.
Most of us cant afford them.

I get the biggest laugh out of the advertising for all these
alternative bulbs. Or should I not laugh and state their outright
lies. They say you will save all kinds of money on your electric
bills. Sure, you will save a few bucks, but you'll be spending 100%
to 50,000% more on lightbulbs. Those CFL bulbs are a minimum of $3
each, often more, compared to 25 cents for an incandescent. And dont
let them fool you, they dont last any longer, in fact most of the ones
I've used lasted less hours than the old standard bulbs.

You're not saving anything in the end.....
More likely spending MORE, often MUCH MORE.....
 
D

dpb

Too bad, GE now sells 90w incandescent bulbs that put out more lumens
than the old style 100w...and they have a greater life span as well.
???

If that's the halogen bulb, they're like $5+/ea whereas incandescents
are $1-/ea.

I'm unaware that GE has a 90W incandescent; if I knew of it I'd be
looking as well as am just now in the process of placing a sizable order
for the precise reason they're going away.

GE at the time of the talk of and institution of the ban was working on
and thought they would have a high-efficiency incandescent that could
meet the standard but they pulled the plug (so to speak) on the R&D
effort in 2008 or thereabouts realizing it couldn't be done (or at least
it couldn't be done w/o such an extensive investment it didn't/wouldn't
pay).

AFAIK the 90W halogen won't meet the standard, either, not sure whether
it escapes the actual ban by being under 100W or not but I can't see it
surviving long in the market place at the price point.

--
 
H

Higgs Boson

I prefer my idea.  I've already stockpiled 400 american made 100 w GE
bulbs.  I'm good to go.
Hey, you;re ahead of me, man! I'd better hit HD or Anawalt this
weekend.

HB
 
H

Higgs Boson

Walmart has them...at least my local one does...but after using led bulbs
for a couple months now, the incandescents are pointless/wasteful
But aren't LED still too expensive? Straight question

HB
 
S

Stormin Mormon

I thought he married Mac Culkin?

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..



Consider Michael Jackson: Where else could a poor black kid
grow up to be a
rich white man and marry Elvis Presley's daughter?

Yes, indeed, America is a great place.
 
S

Stormin Mormon

Hmm. Now, you need some freon, saturday
night specials, heroin, and crack cocaine. Go
into business. You'll make a fortune.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..



I prefer my idea. I've already stockpiled 400
american made 100 w GE bulbs. I'm good to
go.
 
H

HeyBob

Walmart has them...at least my local one does...but after
using led bulbs
for a couple months now, the incandescents are
pointless/wasteful
But aren't LED still too expensive? Straight question

HB

The following explanation was borrowed from Reverend
Hardwick's previous post:


With an electricity cost of 10 cents per kilowatt hour, a
100 watt
incandescent light bulb costs about 1 cent per hour to run.
The average
life span of an incandescent bulb is 1000 hours. If you do
the math
you'll see that over the life of the bulb it will consume
about $10
worth of electricity.

If you do even more math, you'll see that the OP that
stockpiled 100
incandescent light bulbs just bought himself a $4000
electric bill over
the life of the bulbs.

Doing even more math, the wise consumer will see what a
bargain LED
lighting is.
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-202530170/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053
 
T

Tomsic

Obviously you must be a wealthy doctor or lawyer to be able to afford
LED bulbs. Either that, or you used your life savings to buy them,
and will have no savings left for retirement.
Most of us cant afford them.

I get the biggest laugh out of the advertising for all these
alternative bulbs. Or should I not laugh and state their outright
lies. They say you will save all kinds of money on your electric
bills. Sure, you will save a few bucks, but you'll be spending 100%
to 50,000% more on lightbulbs. Those CFL bulbs are a minimum of $3
each, often more, compared to 25 cents for an incandescent. And dont
let them fool you, they dont last any longer, in fact most of the ones
I've used lasted less hours than the old standard bulbs.

You're not saving anything in the end.....
More likely spending MORE, often MUCH MORE.....
You tell a sad story, but it doesn't need to be that way. 7 years after
installing CFL bulbs and using them every evening, I've yet to replace even
one. At 15 cents/kWh, I paid for those things more than 2 years ago and
have been reaping the savings every month since. There are junk CFLs out
there and that's where most people lose because buying cheap is risking
higher costs since you don't know if they will last or not. Buy Energy Star
rated bulbs and you get a replacement warranty plus a lower risk of early
bulb failures.

There are savings to be had just like buying a car that gets more mpg. I
just love driving into a gas station, looking at the pump and see $45-55
which someone just paid and then filling up for $25.

Tomsic
 
T

Tomsic

Vic Smith said:
We haven't changed a bulb in the house for more than a year.
Almost all CFL. For years now.
There are a couple 100W filament bulbs in the basement, and two in the
house on dimmers.
I understand there are dimmable CFL's now, but we don't need them yet.
Nothing to lose sleep over.
The basement filament bulbs are very old, but don't get much use.
One of them the glass is loose, hanging from the screw base.
Still works, and I won't change it until it fails.

Everybody can decide what they want to use. Just stock up.
I mentioned before about picking up 60W equivalent FEIT CFL's for 28
cents a bulb. On sale at Menards. Got 36, in 2 cartons.
That's what we use most.
So those aren't expensive at all.

I don't buy on/off cycling affecting CFL failure more than filament
either.
We have CFL's in the bath and kitchen and they are always being
flipped on/off. Far fewer failures than when we used filaments there.

What I notice since we went to CFL's is the light isn't as good where
there are only single bulbs, like bedroom globed overhead lighting.
But that's because we put the 60W in there instead of 100W filaments.
On the other hand they don't burn out like the filaments did.
Could put 100W CFL's in there, but my wife won't pay too much for
bulbs. 60W seems to the pricing sweet spot. Good enough.
She did pay about 3 bucks for a 100W CFL for the laundry room.
Been there for about 3 years now.

Where I want real good light I have 4' fluorescents.
Same issue as CFL's with warm up time in the garage, but it never
really bothered me.
If it did I'd use 150W filament bulbs there.
Despite all the whining here, they aren't going away.

Haven't tried LEDs yet except for flashlights.
Looking forward to prices coming down.
Technology marches on.
I really like the idea of less watts producing more light.

--Vic
You make a good point about using 4-foot fluorescents. They're the most
widely-used fluorescent lamp in the U.S. and have been made since the 1940s,
so the price is low and the quality high (don't buy cheap off-brand junk
though). Lamp life is 20,000 hours or more. Use them if you can.

Tomsic
 
T

Tomsic

langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

All those words on that page and nowhere do the list the price.....
Or else my browser is failing.....

I'd guess it's more likely that they're real ashamed of the high
price!
Don't see why they should be. I paid $40 at HD for an LED bulb (60 watt
equivalent) two months ago. Now, the price is a few dollars less.
Something that pays back it's initial cost in energy savings and lasts for
years while it does the job is a deal even if the price is higher initially.
What other appliance does that -- clothes dryer, TV, sweeper? Nope.

Tomsic
 
K

krw

We haven't changed a bulb in the house for more than a year.
Almost all CFL.
I've changed three light bulbs in three years. Two of them in a fan on the
back porch and an *expensive* CLF (the straightish type) in a closet (never
left on). We have somewhere around 60 incandescent bulbs and two CFLs in
walk-in closets. I have a few hundred incandescent bulbs in the attic (and
another order going out next week for another hundred 100W bulbs).
 
G

generic.homeowner

Hmm. Now, you need some freon, saturday
night specials, heroin, and crack cocaine. Go
into business. You'll make a fortune.
So this is what the sell at those Moron churches....
Oops, I meant MorMon.
 

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