looking to use an old manual drill fwith sockets


R

rlz

I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-via-flickr1.jpg

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs. I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits. I was wondering if
someone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has a
3/8" square end for deep sockets

I know this is odd, but I sometimes work out on a farm putting in lag
bolts on fences. My cordless drills seem to die at the worst time.
Utilizing this type of setup would help in a pinch.

Robin
 
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K

krw

I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-via-flickr1.jpg

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs. I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It's called a "brace", as in "brace and bit".
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits. I was wondering if
someone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has a
3/8" square end for deep sockets

I know this is odd, but I sometimes work out on a farm putting in lag
bolts on fences. My cordless drills seem to die at the worst time.
Utilizing this type of setup would help in a pinch.
Why not just use a 3/8" ratchet wrench? Use the drill to make a pilot hole.
You do drill pilot holes?
 
H

hr(bob) hofmann

It's called a "brace", as in "brace and bit".



Why not just use a 3/8" ratchet wrench?  Use the drill to make a pilot hole.
You do drill pilot holes?
The bits for a brace and bit set were mostly made for drilling holes
in wood. The bits had rectangular tapered ends to fit into the
brace. My father had one that dated back to the 1930's, don't know
what happened to it.
 
M

mm

I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-via-flickr1.jpg

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs. I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits. I was wondering if
The two teeth are notched, right? That's to hold the corners of a
square bit.
omeone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has a
3/8" square end for deep sockets
I"m not positive what the drive shaft for a 3/8" socket is (3/8"?) but
you could use a solid piece of hardened stock like that. Might be
hard to get at a mere hardware or tool store precisely because it's
not an quite an adapter.

I don't really like the idea of devoting your brace to this one use**,
and only partly because I think you could do this job better with a
set of 3/8 or 1/2" socket wrenches, or at least the ratchet or
crossover bar, the socket that fits, and possibly a 4" extension..

**It's rusty but you could clean it up like new with a wire wheel on a
bench grinder and some kind of lubricant if necesarr in the three
places that might need it.

I'll bet it's 10 inches or more from the handle at one end of the
brace to the other end, plus the length of the "adapter". For some
reason I don't understand, but it's related to leverage somehow, I
find better results with a socket wrench when I use either a short 4"
extension or no extension. I keep the palm of one hand on the the
ratchet where it meets the socket or extension, and crank with the
other hand. After having my good tools stolen out of my car a couple
times, I switched to almost all cheap tools, like 6 or 8 dollars for a
22 piece set (about 10 or 15 years ago) so sometimes I think I"m going
to break the 3/8" ratchet, and then I switch to a cross-over bar,
which comes in some ratchet sets, and can be bought separately. But
if you're on a ranch where the only thieves are the birds, I'd
consider a little more expensive set.

(I did break one ratchet, but only one, over the years, and I broke a
6" extension once. I turned the ratchet very hard, and the top of the
extension rotated while the bottom stayed where it was. There was a
thin line but not apparent break in the chrome where one part rotated
and the other part didn't!)
 
M

mm

I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-via-flickr1.jpg

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs. I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits. I was wondering if
The two teeth are notched, right? That's to hold the corners of a
square bit.
omeone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has a
3/8" square end for deep sockets
I"m not positive what the drive shaft for a 3/8" socket is (3/8"?) but
you could use a solid piece of hardened stock like that. Might be
hard to get at a mere hardware or tool store precisely because it's
not an quite an adapter.

I don't really like the idea of devoting your brace to this one use**,
and only partly because I think you could do this job better with a
set of 3/8 or 1/2" socket wrenches, or at least the ratchet or
crossover bar, the socket that fits, and possibly a 4" extension..

**It's rusty but you could clean it up like new with a wire wheel on a
bench grinder and some kind of lubricant if necesarr in the three
places that might need it.

I'll bet it's 10 inches or more from the handle at one end of the
brace to the other end, plus the length of the "adapter". For some
reason I don't understand, but it's related to leverage somehow, I
find better results with a socket wrench when I use either a short 4"
extension or no extension. I keep the palm of one hand on the the
ratchet where it meets the socket or extension, and crank with the
other hand. After having my good tools stolen out of my car a couple
times, I switched to almost all cheap tools, like 6 or 8 dollars for a
22 piece set (about 10 or 15 years ago) so sometimes I think I"m going
to break the 3/8" ratchet, and then I switch to a cross-over bar,
which comes in some ratchet sets, and can be bought separately. But
if you're on a ranch where the only thieves are the birds, I'd
consider a little more expensive set.

(I did break one ratchet, but only one, over the years, and I broke a
6" extension once. I turned the ratchet very hard, and the top of the
extension rotated while the bottom stayed where it was. There was a
thin line but not apparent break in the chrome where one part rotated
and the other part didn't!)
 
R

RicodJour

I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-...

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs.  I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits.  I was wondering if
someone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has a
3/8" square end for deep sockets

I know this is odd, but I sometimes work out on a farm putting in lag
bolts on fences.  My cordless drills seem to die at the worst time.
Utilizing this type of setup would help in a pinch.

Robin
It's not odd at all. It's a perfect application. Here's a brace
(that's the name of the tool) with interchangeable chucks, and it'll
take sockets.
http://www.garrettwade.com/product.asp?pn=47B01.01&bhcd2=1279428677

They do make 3/8" socket drive adapters, but I'll leave that search to
you. They're cheap enough - figure ten or fifteen bucks max.

R
 
R

ransley

I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-...

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs.  I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits.  I was wondering if
someone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has a
3/8" square end for deep sockets

I know this is odd, but I sometimes work out on a farm putting in lag
bolts on fences.  My cordless drills seem to die at the worst time.
Utilizing this type of setup would help in a pinch.

Robin
A rachet has more extension and torque than a hand drill I have one
and by how far the handle is spaced I dont think you will get much
torque from a hand drill, is a vehicle nearby, a 12v charge adaptor
would be easier to charge up, or an inverter and 120v drill impact
driver is best, or a rachet would be quicker, and longer lasting since
it is designed for the job. Quickest would be a 18-24v Liion impact
driver, Popular Mechanics magazine just did a review of 9 of them for
bolts its the tool of choise, or if you have a vehicle a gas
compressor and air impact driver, the bolts will fly in place with any
impact driver.
 
C

Charlie

It's called a "brace", as in "brace and bit".



Why not just use a 3/8" ratchet wrench? Use the drill to make a pilot
hole.
You do drill pilot holes?
The bits for a brace and bit set were mostly made for drilling holes
in wood. The bits had rectangular tapered ends to fit into the
brace. My father had one that dated back to the 1930's, don't know
what happened to it.


I've still got one. The handiest bit that I have for it is adjustable. I can
make holes that are of non-standard sizes. An advantage of this is the
ability to make hole for a dowel etc. that is a snug fit for the piece.

Charlie
 
S

Stormin Mormon

I've seen drive handles for sockets. Drive handle which is set up in
the same design as a bit brace.

Otherwise, you could take a socket extension stick. Saw off the square
hole. And use your bench grinder to make the end square.

Or, you could use a piece of 3/8 square stock.

I've not seen an extension made, commercially.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-via-flickr1.jpg

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs. I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an
auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It's called a "brace", as in "brace and bit".
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits. I was wondering if
someone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has
a
3/8" square end for deep sockets

I know this is odd, but I sometimes work out on a farm putting in lag
bolts on fences. My cordless drills seem to die at the worst time.
Utilizing this type of setup would help in a pinch.
Why not just use a 3/8" ratchet wrench? Use the drill to make a pilot
hole.
You do drill pilot holes?
 
S

Stormin Mormon

I've got a couple 12 volt drills from Harbor Freight. Figure that when
they die, I'll take em apart. Wire to a lamp cord and lighter socket
plug. That way I can power them off a battery jumper pack. Not as
convenient, but it's portable (somewhat) and turns drills or screws.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-via-flickr1.jpg

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs. I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits. I was wondering if
someone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has a
3/8" square end for deep sockets

I know this is odd, but I sometimes work out on a farm putting in lag
bolts on fences. My cordless drills seem to die at the worst time.
Utilizing this type of setup would help in a pinch.

Robin
 
T

Tony

Stormin said:
I've got a couple 12 volt drills from Harbor Freight. Figure that when
they die, I'll take em apart. Wire to a lamp cord and lighter socket
plug. That way I can power them off a battery jumper pack. Not as
convenient, but it's portable (somewhat) and turns drills or screws.
That's what I was thinking.
 
F

FatterDumber& Happier Moe

rlz said:
I have an old handcrank drill (see link for similiar style)

http://ecoble.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/02/hand-crank-dril-by-dana-via-flickr1.jpg

I was thinking of trying to use it with some socket wrenchs. I'm not
sure what this type of drill is called. I've always called it an auger
drill, but I don't know the exact name.
It has two teeth which grabs the drill bits. I was wondering if
someone makes an adapter that would securely fit this drill that has a
3/8" square end for deep sockets

I know this is odd, but I sometimes work out on a farm putting in lag
bolts on fences. My cordless drills seem to die at the worst time.
Utilizing this type of setup would help in a pinch.

Robin
You are inventing what's called a speed handle. Here's photo a nice
one, http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/36234.jpg
and Sears has them,
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/search_10153_12605?keyword=speeder+wrench&vName=&viewType=24&viewItems=24
E-bay has them,
http://shop.ebay.com/i.html?_nkw=speed+wrench&_sacat=0&_sop=12&_dmd=1&_odkw=tire+iron&_osacat=0&bkBtn=&_trksid=p3286.m270.l1313

Besides, I thought wives were supposed to fix the fence.
 
D

dpb

rlz wrote:
....
Thanks everyone for the posts. I now know its called a Brace. After
googling it, I found that Le Valley has what I'm looking for ...
I have been reworking the feedlot corrals other the last couple of years
which also have a tremendous number of lag bolts for both hinge mounting
and rails (they were built w/ roughsawn full-dimension 2x10-16 or -20
SYP on ties in the late 50s/early 60s).

I keep two Milwaukee red drills, one for pilot (ties) and one for shank
(rails) but as others noted, the tool for driving the lags themselves is
ratchet. One can use it (except for very few locations) in 360-rotation
until nearly driven before needing the ratchet-action. The stroke of a
brace and bit simply isn't enough torque (unless you're talking
toy-sized stuff imo). The batteries last a morning or afternoon of
continuous work at the rate can work by myself so one set of spares is
all that's needed for a day.

OBTW, after drilling and before driving, keep an oil can w/ a long,
straight spout of used motor oil and squirt a couple shots down the
pilot hole and on the lag before driving--makes all the difference in
the world in driving them.

--
 
K

krw

rlz wrote:
...

I have been reworking the feedlot corrals other the last couple of years
which also have a tremendous number of lag bolts for both hinge mounting
and rails (they were built w/ roughsawn full-dimension 2x10-16 or -20
SYP on ties in the late 50s/early 60s).

I keep two Milwaukee red drills, one for pilot (ties) and one for shank
(rails) but as others noted, the tool for driving the lags themselves is
ratchet. One can use it (except for very few locations) in 360-rotation
until nearly driven before needing the ratchet-action. The stroke of a
brace and bit simply isn't enough torque (unless you're talking
toy-sized stuff imo). The batteries last a morning or afternoon of
continuous work at the rate can work by myself so one set of spares is
all that's needed for a day.

OBTW, after drilling and before driving, keep an oil can w/ a long,
straight spout of used motor oil and squirt a couple shots down the
pilot hole and on the lag before driving--makes all the difference in
the world in driving them.
Liquid "soap" works too.
 
K

krw

Far too much trouble/expense compared to "free" used oil...
I didn't mean for that application. Used motor oil gets a bit messy around
the house. ;-)
 
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S

Stormin Mormon

You're the second person to suggest that.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..




A cheap/spare 3/8th socket extension, gound square (or with some flats
on it) for the brace chuck to grip onto?
 

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