Location of CO detector (inside HVAC ducts?)


H

Home Guy

The instructions that come with residential CO detectors tell you to
place them on the ceiling, outside each bedroom, and have at least one
on each level of the house.

They say to not put them in the furnace room.

These locations are typically accessible to the average home owner. For
ease of locating, changing batteries, etc.

I'm wondering why the best place to put one (from a CO detection POV)
wouldn't be somewhere in the distribution ductwork of a forced air
natural gas HVAC system (on the output side - not the return-air side).

In a home where your only source of CO is going to be your furnace (or
your furnace room - if you consider your gas water heater is close to
the furnace), and where the CO is going to reach the bedrooms via the
HVAC ducting, then why not put the CO detector *in* the ductwork?

And if you have a natural-draft furnace, where a bird's nest or some
other obstruction can cause a back-draft of combustion gas into the
furnace area, then why wouldn't the furnace room be the best place to
have the CO detector?

Isin't CO heavier than ambient air - so buildup would naturally be in
the lower areas of the house (where the furnace is likely to be) vs the
upper floors (where you are sleeping) ?
 
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H

Harry K

The instructions that come with residential CO detectors tell you to
place them on the ceiling, outside each bedroom, and have at least one
on each level of the house.

They say to not put them in the furnace room.

These locations are typically accessible to the average home owner.  For
ease of locating, changing batteries, etc.

I'm wondering why the best place to put one (from a CO detection POV)
wouldn't be somewhere in the distribution ductwork of a forced air
natural gas HVAC system (on the output side - not the return-air side).

In a home where your only source of CO is going to be your furnace (or
your furnace room - if you consider your gas water heater is close to
the furnace), and where the CO is going to reach the bedrooms via the
HVAC ducting, then why not put the CO detector *in* the ductwork?

And if you have a natural-draft furnace, where a bird's nest or some
other obstruction can cause a back-draft of combustion gas into the
furnace area, then why wouldn't the furnace room be the best place to
have the CO detector?

Isin't CO heavier than ambient air - so buildup would naturally be in
the lower areas of the house (where the furnace is likely to be) vs the
upper floors (where you are sleeping) ?
Air does not get into the duct work in the 'furnace room" unless there
is a leak there. or it is some ham handed installation.

Harry K
 
T

Tony Hwang

Home said:
The instructions that come with residential CO detectors tell you to
place them on the ceiling, outside each bedroom, and have at least one
on each level of the house.

They say to not put them in the furnace room.

These locations are typically accessible to the average home owner. For
ease of locating, changing batteries, etc.

I'm wondering why the best place to put one (from a CO detection POV)
wouldn't be somewhere in the distribution ductwork of a forced air
natural gas HVAC system (on the output side - not the return-air side).

In a home where your only source of CO is going to be your furnace (or
your furnace room - if you consider your gas water heater is close to
the furnace), and where the CO is going to reach the bedrooms via the
HVAC ducting, then why not put the CO detector *in* the ductwork?

And if you have a natural-draft furnace, where a bird's nest or some
other obstruction can cause a back-draft of combustion gas into the
furnace area, then why wouldn't the furnace room be the best place to
have the CO detector?

Isin't CO heavier than ambient air - so buildup would naturally be in
the lower areas of the house (where the furnace is likely to be) vs the
upper floors (where you are sleeping) ?
Hmmm,
I have one just outside furnace room door on the ceiling and another at
the top of the stairs overhead and another above bedroom door entrance.
All smoke, flame, CO gas detectors are daisy chained hard wired with
some battery back up, not all.
 
T

trader4

Home Guy,

   The important function of these alarms is to inform consumers thatthe
living space has dangerous levels of CO.

Dave M.
And that CO could come not only from a faulty furnace,
but also from a gas oven, fireplace, some dummy heating
the place with a charcoal stove, running a generator, etc.
And even if it's source is the furnace, it could be a leak in
the chimney system upstairs in the house. Really simple
concepts.
 
G

George

Home Guy,


The important function of these alarms is to inform consumers that the
living space has dangerous levels of CO.


Dave M.
"home guy" is the smartest person in North America and says he speaks
for Canada so you think he would know the very simple reason why in
practice you never put smoke or CO detectors near a fuel burning device..
 
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H

Home Guy

HeyBub said:
Go ahead. Put it in the furnace room. Protect the furnace at all
costs! Screw the innocent babes asleep upstairs!
If CO is being generated or released inside a home, wouldn't you want
the detector to be located close to the release point - where
concentrations would be the highest, so as to give you the earliest
warning?

Wouldn't that be near the furnace and/or water heater (if you have a
natural draft forced-air gas furnace AND natural draft gas water heater)
???

And / or inside the plenum leaving the furnace (in case of a cracked
heat exchanger) ?

My chimney is brick and mortar, running exterior to the side of the
house, with no possible connection to interior living space, and I don't
have a gas stove or gas fireplace, and the only other gas appliance is a
clothes dryer, for which I suppose it would be wise to place a CO
detector on the ceiling above the dryer - no?
On this issue, arguing about or questioning the manufacturer's advice
Generic advice.

Why isin't the best place for a detector near to the point where CO is
likely to enter the living space of the house?
 
T

trader4

If CO is being generated or released inside a home, wouldn't you want
the detector to be located close to the release point - where
concentrations would be the highest, so as to give you the earliest
warning?
That would be a wonderful idea, IF the gas furnace was
the only possible source of CO and the only place the CO
from that furnace could get into the house is right by the
furnace. Both those premises are false. A malfunctioning
oven, tankless water heater, dryer, fireplace, wood stove, generator
or even
someone burning a charcoal grill inside can generate CO.
And even if the furnace is the source, it could make it's
way into the house from the chimney via a hole at the
second floor level, while the detector and furnace are in
the basement.

Just how dumb are you?





Wouldn't that be near the furnace and/or water heater (if you have a
natural draft forced-air gas furnace AND natural draft gas water heater)
???
Not if there is a hole in the chimney on the second floor.
You really need to get up on technology. Natural draft
gas furnaces are dinosaurs around here, nyc area.
And you're in Canada, which is supposed to be so
ahead of the USA?




And / or inside the plenum leaving the furnace (in case of a cracked
heat exchanger) ?

My chimney is brick and mortar, running exterior to the side of the
house, with no possible connection to interior living space,
Any type of chimney can potentially deteriorate and have
leaks. And all houses are just like yours, right?




and I don't
have a gas stove or gas fireplace, and the only other gas appliance is a
clothes dryer, for which I suppose it would be wise to place a CO
detector on the ceiling above the dryer - no?
Oh, I see, so now we need at least two, not just one stuck
in the HVAC duct.



Generic advice.

Why isin't the best place for a detector near to the point where CO is
likely to enter the living space of the house?
Because there are multiple potential entry points. And
it would take a whole book of instructions, which the
typical consumer isn't going to go through to figure out all the
possibilities. Not when the existing procedure works OK.

Dumb ass
 
H

Home Guy

trader4@optonline.net said:
That would be a wonderful idea, IF the gas furnace was
the only possible source of CO and the only place the CO
from that furnace could get into the house is right by the
furnace. Both those premises are false.
You're the dumb ass.

I'm considering MY GOD DAMN HOUSE you fool. A house that has 3 gas
appliances - two of which are in the same room - a location that the
maker of the CO detector says is NOT a good place to mount the detector.
Not if there is a hole in the chimney on the second floor.
You really need to get up on technology.
You really need to take your head out of your ass.

There is no second floor where the chimney is.
Natural draft gas furnaces are dinosaurs around here, nyc
area. And you're in Canada, which is supposed to be so
ahead of the USA?
They may be dinosaurs - but I'll take my functional 35-year-old furnace
THAT DOESN'T HAVE ANY GOD DAM ELECTRONICS any day. Reliable as hell. I
dial down the flame output to match heat-output with home heat-loss so
the heat exchanger is operating more efficiently than if the flame
output was set to max.
Oh, I see, so now we need at least two, not just one stuck
in the HVAC duct.
Shows how dumb you are.

The maker of the detector says to have one outside each bedroom. Mine
came as a two-pack (two in the same package). For $10 (or $5 each).
Including 2 AA batteries for each one.
Because there are multiple potential entry points.
So you do agree that it is beneficial to place the detector near the
potential source of a CO leak, and that the ergonomics and number of
sources is something that each individual home owner must deal with
themselves, but with detectors costing $5 to $10 each these days, the
possibility of placing one detector at each source-point is good advice.

Right?
 
T

trader4

You're the dumb ass.
No, we've voted. Just take a look at your approval rating.
About 90% of the folks here think you're the village idiot,
under whatever new posting name you're trying to
hide behind.



I'm considering MY GOD DAMN HOUSE you fool.

"They say to not put them in the furnace room.
These locations are typically accessible to the average home owner.
For
ease of locating, changing batteries, etc.
I'm wondering why the best place to put one (from a CO detection POV)
wouldn't be somewhere in the distribution ductwork of a forced air
natural gas HVAC system (on the output side - not the return-air
side). "


That sure doesn't sound like it's specific to YOUR house.




 A house that has 3 gas
appliances - two of which are in the same room - a location that the
maker of the CO detector says is NOT a good place to mount the detector.



You really need to take your head out of your ass.

There is no second floor where the chimney is.
Again, your post was clearly advocating this as a general
procedure. Now you want to try to weasel away.



They may be dinosaurs - but I'll take my functional 35-year-old furnace
THAT DOESN'T HAVE ANY GOD DAM ELECTRONICS any day.  Reliable as hell.  I
dial down the flame output to match heat-output with home heat-loss so
the heat exchanger is operating more efficiently than if the flame
output was set to max.

I see, but the USA is supposed to be where all the dumb asses
are. We're saving hundreds a year in fuel costs, while you send
it up the flue. Of course if an American had such a dinosaur furnace,
why it would be the perfect example of incompetence.



Shows how dumb you are.
So, you still think it's a good idea to put it in the HVAC duct?



The maker of the detector says to have one outside each bedroom.  Mine
came as a two-pack (two in the same package).  For $10 (or $5 each).
Including 2 AA batteries for each one.
Did that break your budget?


So you do agree that it is beneficial to place the detector near the
potential source of a CO leak, and that the ergonomics and number of
sources is something that each individual home owner must deal with
themselves, but with detectors costing $5 to $10 each these days, the
possibility of placing one detector at each source-point is good advice.

Right?
No I don't fool. For all the reasons I and others have already
given you.
 
H

Harry K

And that CO could come not only from a faulty furnace,
but also from a gas oven, fireplace, some dummy heating
the place with a charcoal stove, running a generator, etc.
And even if it's source is the furnace, it could be a leak in
the chimney system upstairs in the house.  Really simple
concepts.
Or my wood stove. I was woke at 0 dark thirty one frosty night by my
CO detector screaming at me. Found that powdery creasote had plugged
the bird screen on top of the chimney.

Harry K
 
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H

Harry K

On 3/13/2013 8:20 PM, David L. Martel wrote:> Home Guy,



"home guy" is the smartest person in North America and says he speaks
for Canada so you think he would know the very simple reason why in
practice you never put smoke or CO detectors near a fuel burning device..
Or run a chainsaw while standing under one in a basement. Yes, I did,
cutting a beam during a remodel.

Harry K
 
H

Harry K

You're the dumb ass.

I'm considering MY GOD DAMN HOUSE you fool.  A house that has 3 gas
appliances - two of which are in the same room - a location that the
maker of the CO detector says is NOT a good place to mount the detector.
So why the hell don't you go argue with the manufacturere and show him
how a dumbass like you knows more about where to stick them than they
do? I'd pay to see it.

<snip more stupidity>

Harry K
 
D

David L. Martel

Looks like I screwed up when I reset for Daylight Savings Time.

Thanks,
Dave M.
 
A

Attila Iskander

David L. Martel said:
Looks like I screwed up when I reset for Daylight Savings Time.
If you're running Windows, the OS should do that automatically.
 
D

David L. Martel

Home Guy,


The important function of these alarms is to inform consumers that the
living space has dangerous levels of CO.


Dave M.
 
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H

hrhofmann

And just WHERE was your CO detector? In the furnace room? In the garage (if
you left your car running, well, there you are)? Perhaps in the mail-box out
near the street?

Or was it in your bedroom?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Iseally, you would have one close to the bedrooms so you would hear it
when it goes off, and maybe a second one somewhere closer to the
possible source(s) of fire or CO2. I have three, one in the basement
close to the furnace room and my workshop, one in the family room
where we have a woodburning fireplace drop-in unit with glass doors,
and one outside the 3 upstairs bedrooms. Only the family room goes
off when I have a fire and forget to open the damper fully when adding
firewood. I normally keep the fireplace damper about 1/2 open as the
wood burns a little slower, and using smoke I determined that even 1/2
open, there was suction from the family room into the fireplace
itself.

I think the manufacturers want the units installed near the bedrooms
as that is the most likely place where there could be problems and no
one would realize it. CO2 makes people sleepy/drowsy, so if they are
awake, they would notice a problem and hopefully have enuf sense to
get out, If it were a fire, again if they were awake, they probably
would figure out there was a problem. But asleep, either one would be
potentially fatal.
 
H

Harry K

And just WHERE was your CO detector? In the furnace room? In the garage (if
you left your car running, well, there you are)? Perhaps in the mail-box out
near the street?

Or was it in your bedroom?
WTH??? In the hallway outside the bedroom. Where the hell did you
think it would be?

Harry K
 
P

PaxPerPoten

On 3/13/2013 10:01 AM, Home Guy wrote:> "(e-mail address removed)" wrote

I have a helluva an idea for you....

Why don't you go to a CO detector web site and get the

information you seek ...direct from the horses mouth?

And delete Home Repair from our NG.
 
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P

PaxPerPoten

If you're running Windows, the OS should do that automatically.
It was apparently too busy sending your personal information to Microshaft.
 
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