Lightbulbs stuck


G

gary watson

Evening all,

I have some flush mounted ceiling lamp fittings in my kitchen ceiling.
I hope you know what I mean - I think "recessed" may also be another
term used to describe this sort of lighting.

Anyway, they use ordinary incandescent bulbs (60W - reflector type -
screw fitting) and every time a bulb dies I have an enourmous struggle
to remove the dead one. I don't know why they are so difficult to
remove.

I asked an electrician, who was round to do some other stuff, for his
opinion and he reckoned that this type of fittings are not so good as
far as the life expectancy of the lightbulbs are concerned (which also
seems to be true) possibly due to the reduced heat dissipation but was
at a loss to account for the difficulty of their removal.

It's not like they weld themselves into place - there's usually a
little bit of play - but it's difficult to get them beyond this slight
movement when trying to unscrew them completely. The only means of
applying pressure is via the exposed flattish front surface of the
bulb - I don't want to apply too much pressure since I am mindful that
I may shatter the bulb and cut my fingers - but in any case more
pressure doesn't seem to make much difference since my fingers just
start slipping - I don't think I have particularly greasy fingers
(?!?!). I've also tried removing the fitting from the hole in the
ceiling (also a pain in the backside) to see if I could get a grip on
the bulb from its stem but this is covered by the lampholder casing.

Short of smashing the bulb and using a pair of pliers to remove the
screw cap from the fitting I can't think how to get the spent bulb
out. The fittings themselves look like some sort of DIY shed bottom of
the range variety (maybe that is why they are so cr*p) and I am
considering replacing them with something or other - to be decided
when we have planned what we are going to do with the kitchen - in the
meantime I am reluctant to replace them temporarily.

I would be interested to know if any newsgroup members have
experienced similar problems and in particular know of a solution for
the removal of these stubborn bulbs.

My kitchen is getting darker and darker.

I hope someone can offer some suitable advice.

Yours, annoyed and frustrated,

Gary.
 
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J

John

gary watson said:
Evening all,

I have some flush mounted ceiling lamp fittings in my kitchen ceiling.
I hope you know what I mean - I think "recessed" may also be another
term used to describe this sort of lighting.

Anyway, they use ordinary incandescent bulbs (60W - reflector type -
screw fitting) and every time a bulb dies I have an enourmous struggle
to remove the dead one. I don't know why they are so difficult to
remove.

I asked an electrician, who was round to do some other stuff, for his
opinion and he reckoned that this type of fittings are not so good as
far as the life expectancy of the lightbulbs are concerned (which also
seems to be true) possibly due to the reduced heat dissipation but was
at a loss to account for the difficulty of their removal.

It's not like they weld themselves into place - there's usually a
little bit of play - but it's difficult to get them beyond this slight
movement when trying to unscrew them completely. The only means of
applying pressure is via the exposed flattish front surface of the
bulb - I don't want to apply too much pressure since I am mindful that
I may shatter the bulb and cut my fingers - but in any case more
pressure doesn't seem to make much difference since my fingers just
start slipping - I don't think I have particularly greasy fingers
(?!?!). I've also tried removing the fitting from the hole in the
ceiling (also a pain in the backside) to see if I could get a grip on
the bulb from its stem but this is covered by the lampholder casing.

Short of smashing the bulb and using a pair of pliers to remove the
screw cap from the fitting I can't think how to get the spent bulb
out. The fittings themselves look like some sort of DIY shed bottom of
the range variety (maybe that is why they are so cr*p) and I am
considering replacing them with something or other - to be decided
when we have planned what we are going to do with the kitchen - in the
meantime I am reluctant to replace them temporarily.

I would be interested to know if any newsgroup members have
experienced similar problems and in particular know of a solution for
the removal of these stubborn bulbs.

My kitchen is getting darker and darker.

I hope someone can offer some suitable advice.

Yours, annoyed and frustrated,

Gary.
Have you tried wearing a pair of Marigolds to give better grip. I use this
technique and if that fails I do as you said, smash the bulb and withdraw
the threaded part with long nosed pliers. If you do this hold a bucket over
the bulb and smash it with a screwdriver handle. Turn of the power first
and wear goggles!! By the way, they do actually weld themselves to the
fitting due to the on/off and heat over a period of time, try 'tightening'
them first aswell in order to break the seal.

HTH

John
 
J

Jeff

gary watson wrote :-

I would be interested to know if any newsgroup members have
experienced similar problems and in particular know of a solution for
the removal of these stubborn bulbs.

My kitchen is getting darker and darker.

I hope someone can offer some suitable advice.

Yours, annoyed and frustrated,

Gary.
Put 4 of them in my kitchen 3 years ago and am not impressed, they eat
bulbs, quality bulbs are expensive and don't last any longer than cheapo
ones, and yes they are a pain to change, edison screw says it all.....
stupid way of fixing a bulb. I will cure the problem soon by throwing them
in the bin, methinks halogens are favorite for a replacement.

Regards Jeff
 
M

Mike

Jeff said:
Put 4 of them in my kitchen 3 years ago and am not impressed, they eat
bulbs, quality bulbs are expensive and don't last any longer than cheapo
ones, and yes they are a pain to change, edison screw says it all.....
stupid way of fixing a bulb. I will cure the problem soon by throwing them
in the bin, methinks halogens are favorite for a replacement.

If you think ESs don't last long, wait til you've tried GU10s !!!!!
 
B

Bob Eager

It's not like they weld themselves into place - there's usually a
little bit of play - but it's difficult to get them beyond this slight
movement when trying to unscrew them completely. The only means of
applying pressure is via the exposed flattish front surface of the
bulb - I don't want to apply too much pressure since I am mindful that
I may shatter the bulb and cut my fingers - but in any case more
pressure doesn't seem to make much difference since my fingers just
start slipping - I don't think I have particularly greasy fingers
(?!?!).
How about trying wearing rubber gloves - get some grip, and protect
fingers too...?
 
J

Jeff

Mike wrote :-
If you think ESs don't last long, wait til you've tried GU10s !!!!!
Is a GU10 the 2 pin halogen plug fitting ?
I put a halogen in my shower, the bulb lasted 14 months and was about £2 to
replace = result :)

Regards Jeff
 
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B

bigcat

gary said:
Anyway, they use ordinary incandescent bulbs (60W - reflector type -
screw fitting) and every time a bulb dies I have an enourmous struggle
to remove the dead one. I don't know why they are so difficult to
remove.
Thats ES for you. My solution is only screw the bulbs in far enough
that they start to grip, dont screw them home.

Some of those fittings are quite happy with GLS bulbs in fwiw.


NT
 
L

Lurch

If you think ESs don't last long, wait til you've tried GU10s !!!!!
I don't know where people get this idea from, I've got 17 GU10s in
here and I've replaced only 2 or 3 lamps in the last couple of years.
All of the lights have been in for anywhere between 12 months and 4
years.

Perhaps it's because I always buy decent branded lamps rather than
some shite off the market?
 
D

Dave Liquorice

Thats ES for you. My solution is only screw the bulbs in far enough
that they start to grip, dont screw them home.
But any vibration might unscrew them if they are at all loose or as
the heat makes the center contact loose it's temper you get an iffy
connection which makes more heat so the softens even more etc...

I do the same thing as valves or taps. Do 'em finger tight then back
off 1/4 turn.
 
R

Rob

"gary watson" wrote in message >
I would be interested to know if any newsgroup members have
experienced similar problems and in particular know of a solution
for
the removal of these stubborn bulbs.
I find the glass envelope usually twists off intact, no broken glass
to worry about, then I use pliers to unscrew the ES base from the
fitting. Mine don't last long (GE Lighting R63, 99p from the local
hardware shop).
I wonder if a smear of silicone grease on the screw thread before
fitting would help?

Rob
 
M

Mike

Jeff said:
Mike wrote :-

Is a GU10 the 2 pin halogen plug fitting ?
I put a halogen in my shower, the bulb lasted 14 months and was about £2 to
replace = result :)
2 'pins' sounds more like the 12volt ones which last a long time. GU10s are
mains and use two 'lug's' (anybody got a better term) and last about a month
or two.
 
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B

bigcat

Rob said:
I wonder if a smear of silicone grease on the screw thread before
fitting would help?
That sounds a better idea than graphite, which is what I thought of :)

If anyone stupid's reading, dont apply graphite.

NT
 
A

Andrew Chesters

Rob wrote:




That sounds a better idea than graphite, which is what I thought of :)

If anyone stupid's reading, dont apply graphite.

NT
I'd put silicon in the dIMM pile too. Surely it'll burn off/go sticky
in the time your bulb lasts?
 
F

Frank Erskine

2 'pins' sounds more like the 12volt ones which last a long time. GU10s are
mains and use two 'lug's' (anybody got a better term) and last about a month
or two.
I've had six 50W GU10s in my bathroom for about two years, and have
only needed to replace one.
 
G

gary watson

.......... snip, snip ...8<
Have you tried wearing a pair of Marigolds to give better grip. I use this
technique and if that fails I do as you said, smash the bulb and withdraw
the threaded part with long nosed pliers. If you do this hold a bucket over
the bulb and smash it with a screwdriver handle. Turn of the power first
and wear goggles!! By the way, they do actually weld themselves to the
fitting due to the on/off and heat over a period of time, try 'tightening'
them first aswell in order to break the seal.

HTH

John
I tried the marigolds - a good suggestion - I got a much better grip -
but I still can't get the thing to loosen - as I said it has a bit of
play - I've twisted the bulb in both directions dozens of times but it
just doesn't seem to loosen - in the past they've always (eventually)
submitted to bare finger pressure and a combination of wiggling and a
few twists in either direction.

I think I'll wait until I'm at home during the daylight this coming
weekend and resort to the pliers method.

Thanks for your (and everyone else's) suggestions,

Gary
 
N

Newshound

Actually graphite would be fine as long as you didn't plaster it over the
insulator. Silicone oil/grease will stand 300 C or so and the cap should be
cooler than that.
 
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B

bigcat

Newshound said:
Actually graphite would be fine as long as you didn't plaster it over the
insulator.
I doubt it. Even if applied with due care it will spread, turning every
insulator into an insulation test failure.

Silicone oil/grease will stand 300 C or so and the cap should be
cooler than that.
Thats what I'd pick if I were unwiling to just not do them up too
tight.


NT
 

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