Lightbulbs stuck in ceiling fan


J

Jethro

All my fans have same problem. When I go to change out a burned-out
bulb, it is stuck because the threads are stuck. I guess the heat
corrodes the metallic threads either in the bulb, socket or both?

I have tried WD40 some, and it helps some, but anyone have another
idea?

Thanks
Jethro
 
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H

hallerb

avoid flame bulbs they fail stuck a lot.

turn off power and use needle nose pliars to remove.....
 
E

Evo

Jethro said:
All my fans have same problem. When I go to change out a burned-out
bulb, it is stuck because the threads are stuck. I guess the heat
corrodes the metallic threads either in the bulb, socket or both?

I have tried WD40 some, and it helps some, but anyone have another
idea?

Thanks
Jethro
make sure the bulbs have cooled and use a towel and try to twist them out if
they break which will happen make sure the power is off and use a potato or
needle nose pliers. Works for me.
The problem with most fans these days, they're built in CHINA with cheap
materials

RV
 
P

professorpaul

LIGHTLY wipe the threads with some silicon grease before you put them
back it. You should be able to find this in any hardware store. Just
put a dab on a rag, wipe it on, and then wipe it off, leaveing a THIN
coat. This will prevent them from seizing up. The issue is not the
materials ... cheap or expensive ... but the fact that they run hot,
have a small surface area on the base, and any moisture will enhance
corrosion. I have also heard the suggestion of jaming a raw potato
(power off!!) against the broken base and using this as a lever to get
the broken bulb base out of the socket.
 
R

RBM

I've never met a potato that was successful at this, and most people destroy
everything picking at it with a needle nose. You certainly should use a dab
of antiox to prevent it from oxidizing to begin with, but bulbs are just
being made more cheaply now, and they're bases do break off the lamp. I've
had excellent success using a diagonal pliers. Their wedge shaped tip fits
right onto the edge of the bulb base and can turn it out without any damage
to the socket below. Just be SURE to turn power off first
 
D

DerbyDad03

I must not be like most people <g>

Once the glass have broken out of the base, I have successfully used
needle nose pliers on numerous occasions to grab the metal base of the
bulb and bend the edge away from the socket enough to grip it with
pliers and spin it out.

However, I do agree with using some type of agent to eliminate the root
cause.
 
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K

kv888831393ster

Yes I've used needle nosed pliers to do this succesfully. I've been
using this bulb lube for the last few years. Available at Lowes and
Menards. This is essentially the silicone grease idea as above. You can
also get a similar product at automotive stores.
Richard
 
P

professorpaul

Just to add another comment -- metals like coppy alloys, and aluminum
actually weld together if pressed hard enough. That is essentially what
is at the heart of the problem. The dielectric grease would be good,
but I though the regular silcon stuff might be easier to find, it being
a common hardware store item.
 
R

Rick Brandt

Joseph Meehan said:
Quality lamps use real brass for the base material. Cheap ones use
aluminum or other cheaper materials. They sometimes color the aluminum to
look like brass. In the future makes sure you are getting quality lamps. The
problems are doubled if the fixture is using aluminum sockets.

You might also consider using a dielectric grease on the threads. You can
get it in small qualities at most automotive stores. Use very little. I
suggest not using other types of grease.
Is there some big drawback to the "push and quarter turn" style that Europe
uses? I have often wondered why we stay with these damned threaded bulbs.
Certainly plenty other bulb "types" have been introduced and accepted that don't
need to be "screwed" in, but for the standard ceiling and lamp fixture we appear
to be trapped with a crappy format.
 
E

Eigenvector

Rick Brandt said:
Is there some big drawback to the "push and quarter turn" style that
Europe uses? I have often wondered why we stay with these damned threaded
bulbs. Certainly plenty other bulb "types" have been introduced and
accepted that don't need to be "screwed" in, but for the standard ceiling
and lamp fixture we appear to be trapped with a crappy format.
What's the issue? I've been using them for as long as I could turn a bulb
and I've never had a problem.

Perhaps bulbs seizing up is more a factor of the gorilla like force used to
tighten them in their socket. You don't have to torque them to 120 ft-lbs
to get a good connection.
 
R

Rick Brandt

Eigenvector said:
What's the issue? I've been using them for as long as I could turn a bulb and
I've never had a problem.

Perhaps bulbs seizing up is more a factor of the gorilla like force used to
tighten them in their socket. You don't have to torque them to 120 ft-lbs to
get a good connection.
In my experience I would estimate that at least a fourth of the burned out bulbs
I replace break off leaving the base in the socket. I turn the bulb until it
bottoms and then I stop. Should I be stopping before it bottoms?

Disregarding any of that, how many other screw-in electrical devices are there?
Not many I would guess. It's just a stupid way to connect a lamp to its socket.
 
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C

Charles Schuler

Jethro said:
All my fans have same problem. When I go to change out a burned-out
bulb, it is stuck because the threads are stuck. I guess the heat
corrodes the metallic threads either in the bulb, socket or both?

I have tried WD40 some, and it helps some, but anyone have another
idea?
Lots of good posts here. Fixtures and bulbs made in China are a big part of
the problem. Silicon spray/grease or WD40 can help. Do not overtighten
when installing. When removing, if the glass separates from the metal base,
turn off the power and have at it with pliers.
 
N

Nick Hull

Rick Brandt said:
In my experience I would estimate that at least a fourth of the burned out
bulbs
I replace break off leaving the base in the socket. I turn the bulb until it
bottoms and then I stop. Should I be stopping before it bottoms?
Screw bulb in, turn on, unscrew intil light goes out, screw in halfway ;)
 
R

Rick Brandt

Nick Hull said:
Screw bulb in, turn on, unscrew intil light goes out, screw in halfway ;)
Yeah, perhaps if the amount of travel on the center contact was quite a bit
larger then the light would illuminate while still being "loose".
 
K

kv888831393ster

This would be a good idea if you like the quality of the light. I've
always felt that this problem is caused by heat buildup at the base of
the bulb. Especially if they burn base up or enclosed like in globes or
recessed fixtures. Even more so if they're mushrooms like RSPs or RFLs
with the slim necks.
Richard
 
M

maradcliff

All my fans have same problem. When I go to change out a burned-out
bulb, it is stuck because the threads are stuck. I guess the heat
corrodes the metallic threads either in the bulb, socket or both?

I have tried WD40 some, and it helps some, but anyone have another
idea?

Thanks
Jethro
Coat all new bulb threads with silicone grease. Available at all auto
parts stores - made for spark plug boots.
 
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M

maradcliff

Is there some big drawback to the "push and quarter turn" style that Europe
uses? I have often wondered why we stay with these damned threaded bulbs.
Certainly plenty other bulb "types" have been introduced and accepted that don't
need to be "screwed" in, but for the standard ceiling and lamp fixture we appear
to be trapped with a crappy format.
Americans like to screw !!!!! <lol>
 
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J

Jethro

avoid flame bulbs they fail stuck a lot.

turn off power and use needle nose pliars to remove.....

Thanks everyone!

Silicon Grease it is.

I'll get some today.

Jethro
 
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