Levelling a floor


S

stuartcotterell

I've just moved into an old flat that has been subject to some movement
in the past. As a result, there is a fairly significant slope in one of
the rooms. I've not properly measured the slope, but it equates to a
height drop of a couple of inches over a metre or so.

I'm evaluating a couple of ways of fixing this. The most "pure" one
strikes me as being lifting the boards, packing the joists until level,
and then relaying boards.

Alternatively, someone has mentioned building a "false" floor on top of
the existing boards. Basically, adding new joists to above the boards,
then laying a new set of boards, basically giving a whole new floor.

Finally, someone suggested to me that some self-levelling floor
compound could do the job. This does strike me as an easy option, which
consequently make me very uneasy about it! Does anyone have any
experience of using this stuff to level a floor? I'll be laying carpet
on top of it eventuallly, if that makes any difference.

If anyone has been through the joys of doing this in the past, I'd be
most grateful to get some thoughts and wisdom!
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

adder1969

I've just moved into an old flat that has been subject to some movement
in the past. As a result, there is a fairly significant slope in one of
the rooms. I've not properly measured the slope, but it equates to a
height drop of a couple of inches over a metre or so.
2 inches per metre is a lot to level using a compound!
If the boards come up easy it's easiest to screw battens to the side of
the old joists and relay the boards.
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

I've just moved into an old flat that has been subject to some movement
in the past. As a result, there is a fairly significant slope in one of
the rooms. I've not properly measured the slope, but it equates to a
height drop of a couple of inches over a metre or so.

I'm evaluating a couple of ways of fixing this. The most "pure" one
strikes me as being lifting the boards, packing the joists until level,
and then relaying boards.

Alternatively, someone has mentioned building a "false" floor on top of
the existing boards. Basically, adding new joists to above the boards,
then laying a new set of boards, basically giving a whole new floor.

Finally, someone suggested to me that some self-levelling floor
compound could do the job. This does strike me as an easy option, which
consequently make me very uneasy about it! Does anyone have any
experience of using this stuff to level a floor? I'll be laying carpet
on top of it eventuallly, if that makes any difference.

If anyone has been through the joys of doing this in the past, I'd be
most grateful to get some thoughts and wisdom!
Try two inches over a meter..

It's not worth messing with leveling compound on wood unless you want to
tile..and in any case it gets expensive.

If you don't care about the original floor that much, the easiest thing
is to replace it with flooring chipboard. Whether you lift whats there
or put it over the top is more a question of final height, and condition
of what's there.

Of course lifting a floor is a great opportunity to run wires and pipes
underneath...
 
T

TMC

I've just moved into an old flat that has been subject to some movement
in the past. As a result, there is a fairly significant slope in one of
the rooms. I've not properly measured the slope, but it equates to a
height drop of a couple of inches over a metre or so.

I'm evaluating a couple of ways of fixing this. The most "pure" one
strikes me as being lifting the boards, packing the joists until level,
and then relaying boards.

Alternatively, someone has mentioned building a "false" floor on top of
the existing boards. Basically, adding new joists to above the boards,
then laying a new set of boards, basically giving a whole new floor.

Finally, someone suggested to me that some self-levelling floor
compound could do the job. This does strike me as an easy option, which
consequently make me very uneasy about it! Does anyone have any
experience of using this stuff to level a floor? I'll be laying carpet
on top of it eventuallly, if that makes any difference.

If anyone has been through the joys of doing this in the past, I'd be
most grateful to get some thoughts and wisdom!
Do you really mean 2 inches drop per metre of floor as this would equate to
8 inches of height difference across a 4 metre wide room. I assume that you
have no door opening on the side that you have to lift by this much.

What is the actual height difference across the whole room?

Are the walls out of vertical as well?

Tony
 
S

stuartcotterell

TMC said:
Do you really mean 2 inches drop per metre of floor as this would equate to
8 inches of height difference across a 4 metre wide room. I assume that you
have no door opening on the side that you have to lift by this much.

What is the actual height difference across the whole room?

Are the walls out of vertical as well?

Tony
It is a fair old drop, but it isn't consistent across the whole room.
Basically. there's a dip in the first metre from the doorframe that is
probably just over an inch. There's then a much more gradual slope
across the whole room. I really should measure it up properly to
establish the severity of the slope.

The walls are surprisingly ok.
 
S

stuartcotterell

Stuart said:
What caused it, and has it now stopped....?
From memory, the surveyor didn't state the original cause, but did
state unambiguously that there were no recent signs of movement, and no
cause for concern.
 
T

TMC

state unambiguously that there were no recent signs of movement, and no
cause for concern.
I would do some serious measuring over the whole floor to establish exactly
what you are dealing with

Laying a new floor on top, tongue and groove chipboard would be easiest,
supported at 400mm centres with appropriate thickness packing where needed.

You also need to consider how to manage door way as a step the thickness of
the chipboard is easy to trip over

Ripping up the old floor and replacing with new after packing joists to
level could be a better option as the doorway would not then have a step.
However the old boards may not be in a good enough condition to use again.
You also need to determine whether any of the walls are built on top of the
existing floor as often happens with internal walls

Either way all the skirting will also need to come off and be refitted or
replaced along with any electrical sockets that may end up being too close
to the new floor or the new skirting There may also need to be adjustments
to any central heating radiator

Final thought is there a room below and if so what condition is the ceiling
of that room as it may be affected by the work suggested above

Tony
 
D

djc

I've just moved into an old flat that has been subject to some movement
in the past. As a result, there is a fairly significant slope in one of
the rooms. I've not properly measured the slope, but it equates to a
height drop of a couple of inches over a metre or so.
Does it matter? My 200 year old flat has a notable slope to the floor,
part due to age, the heavily used area by the door, and probably because
the whole terrace has probably drifted down toward the metropolitan line
cutting. I simply put 1.5 inch blocks under the front of a wardrobe to
maintain it upright and aligned with the wall.
 
Ad

Advertisements

B

baxter basics

Does the floor "bounce" at all? I had a bad ground floor lean and a lot
of bounce...pulled up some boards and found several rotted joist ends.
Trimmed these, then jacked them up to level and spliced in new ends.

If you have a big variation I reckon its worth investigating in case
there is something seriously wrong...the extra weight of screed/false
floor could just make it worse.

cheers
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

leveling a floor 8
Floor leveling 8
leveling floor 4
Floor leveler 0
Floor levelling 9
Floor leveling 4
Floor leveler 1
Level floors 5

Top