Leaking around toilet tank bolts - afraid to tighten too much...


B

blueman

I replaced the gasket and tank bolts of a 10+ year old toilet.
The tank bolt kit included rubber-fiber and stainless washers.
The kit warned about tightening the bolts too much and potentially
cracking the porcelain but I still tightened them a fair bit - enough
to deform the rubber washers.

When I filled the tank, water dripped out in a steady stream from both
sides. Tightening the nuts a bit more didn't seem to make much of a
difference.

I don't see any crack in the porcelain and the contact surface around
the washers seems pretty flat without any noticeable pits, bumps, or
cracks.

- Is there any "trick" to making the joints leak tight or do I just need
to keep tightening?

- How likely am I to crack it if I tighten more?

- Am I better off adding some pure silicon caulk to make it watertight
or do I just keep tightening until the leaking stops and hope the
porcelain won't crack?

- Any other suggestions?

Thanks
 
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M

Mike rock

I replaced the gasket and tank bolts of a 10+ year old toilet.
The tank bolt kit included rubber-fiber and stainless washers.
The kit warned about tightening the bolts too much and potentially
cracking the porcelain but I still tightened them a fair bit - enough
to deform the rubber washers.

When I filled the tank, water dripped out in a steady stream from both
sides. Tightening the nuts a bit more didn't seem to make much of a
difference.

I don't see any crack in the porcelain and the contact surface around
the washers seems pretty flat without any noticeable pits, bumps, or
cracks.

- Is there any "trick" to making the joints leak tight or do I just need
  to keep tightening?

- How likely am I to crack it if I tighten more?

- Am I better off adding some pure silicon caulk to make it watertight
  or do I just keep tightening until the leaking stops and hope the
  porcelain won't crack?

- Any other suggestions?

Thanks
Smething else is wrong. The wax seal might be no good, or maybe the
drain is clogged or perhaps you have a crack in your toilet you can't
see. The only way you are going to tell is if you remove the toilet.
 
W

William Munny

blueman said:
I replaced the gasket and tank bolts of a 10+ year old toilet.
The tank bolt kit included rubber-fiber and stainless washers.
The kit warned about tightening the bolts too much and potentially
cracking the porcelain but I still tightened them a fair bit - enough
to deform the rubber washers.

When I filled the tank, water dripped out in a steady stream from both
sides. Tightening the nuts a bit more didn't seem to make much of a
difference.

I don't see any crack in the porcelain and the contact surface around
the washers seems pretty flat without any noticeable pits, bumps, or
cracks.

- Is there any "trick" to making the joints leak tight or do I just need
to keep tightening?

- How likely am I to crack it if I tighten more?

- Am I better off adding some pure silicon caulk to make it watertight
or do I just keep tightening until the leaking stops and hope the
porcelain won't crack?

- Any other suggestions?

Thanks
If the washers are deformed, you may have tightened the bolts too much.
Consider replacing the washers with some new high quality ones-- maybe even
new bolts too.
 
C

Chuck

Mike said:
Smething else is wrong. The wax seal might be no good, or maybe the
drain is clogged or perhaps you have a crack in your toilet you can't
see. The only way you are going to tell is if you remove the toilet.
You mention that you tightened the bolts "enough to deform the rubber
washers". This may be the problem. A deformed washer is not seated
properly and could cause the leak. Replace the washers and then don't
tighten them so much that they are deformed. CB
 
C

Charlie

blueman said:
I replaced the gasket and tank bolts of a 10+ year old toilet.
The tank bolt kit included rubber-fiber and stainless washers.
The kit warned about tightening the bolts too much and potentially
cracking the porcelain but I still tightened them a fair bit - enough
to deform the rubber washers.

When I filled the tank, water dripped out in a steady stream from both
sides. Tightening the nuts a bit more didn't seem to make much of a
difference.

I don't see any crack in the porcelain and the contact surface around
the washers seems pretty flat without any noticeable pits, bumps, or
cracks.

- Is there any "trick" to making the joints leak tight or do I just need
to keep tightening?

- How likely am I to crack it if I tighten more?

- Am I better off adding some pure silicon caulk to make it watertight
or do I just keep tightening until the leaking stops and hope the
porcelain won't crack?
- Any other suggestions?

Thanks
Be sure that the sequence of putting on the washers etc. is right.

Check out this video
http://www.ehow.com/video_2329611_install-toilet-tank-bolts.html

Charlie
 
B

Bob F

Mike said:
Smething else is wrong. The wax seal might be no good, or maybe the
drain is clogged or perhaps you have a crack in your toilet you can't
see. The only way you are going to tell is if you remove the toilet.
Amazing how many people reply without reading the origional post.

Wax seal? On a toilet tank?
 
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T

Thomas

see. The only way you are going to tell is if you remove the toilet.
Amazing how many people reply without reading the origional post.

Wax seal? On a toilet tank?-
I was thinking the same thing.
 
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B

bob haller

Turns out that I had replace the bolts/washers in the original order
� � �bolt
� � �metal washer
� � �rubber washer
� � �tank bottom
� � �bowl rim
� � �rubber washer
� � �metal washer
� � �nut

However, the replacement parts came with a difficult to follow diagram
which I in retrospect realized was:
� � �bolt
� � �metal washer
� � �rubber washer
� � �tank bottom
� � �nut

� � �bowl rim
� � �rubber washer
� � �metal washer
� � �nut

This makes sense in that it allows you to tighten the seal at the tank
independent of the connection to the bowl. It also allows the seal to
sit perfectly flat and reduces the risk of cracking the tank/bowl just
in order to get a tight seal

I decided to do this one better by purchasing a pack of spare rubber
washers and doing the following:
� � �bolt
� � �metal washer
� � �rubber washer
� � �tank bottom
� � �rubber washer
� � �metal washer
� � �nut

� � �bowl rim
� � �rubber washer
� � �metal washer
� � �nut

I also added some plumbers putty for good measure.
Works like a charm...

Thanks for motivating me to look more carefully at the package...- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
I ALWAYS add some silicone caulk to each bolt, and under sink drain
fittings to prevent leaks.

this after a persistent leak the plumber disassembled and used
silicone caulk.......

cost about 80 bucks lesson learned
 

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