kiln-dried timber doors


S

sm_jamieson

I've now got some pine bifold doors from B&Q.
Says kiln-dried, must be sealed as soon as removed from protective
packaging (which had holes in !).
That puts the frights on you.
What can I do to seal it sufficiently until I fit it and properly
paint it ?
How should I store it for now ?

Simon.
 
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T

Tim W

sm_jamieson said:
I've now got some pine bifold doors from B&Q.
Says kiln-dried, must be sealed as soon as removed from protective
packaging (which had holes in !).
That puts the frights on you.
What can I do to seal it sufficiently until I fit it and properly
paint it ?
How should I store it for now ?

Simon.
They can be stored unwrapped or wrapped in the same environment they are
going to be installed in that is if they are going in a dry heated house
keep them somewhere dry, not out in a shed or under a tarp in the garden or
in the conservatory in full sun. Putting some finish on them or keeping them
wrapped is wise because it will slow the rate at which the wood takes in
moisture or dries out.

Tim W
 
S

sm_jamieson

They can be stored unwrapped or wrapped in the same environment they are
going to be installed in that is if they are going in a dry heated house
keep them somewhere dry, not out in a shed or under a tarp in the garden or
in the conservatory in full sun. Putting some finish on them or keeping them
wrapped is wise because it will slow the rate at which the wood takes in
moisture or dries out.

Tim W
Yep, I've wrapped them back up for the time being.
I had to unwrap to fold in half (bifold doors) to fit in the car along
with me !
Simon.
 
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S

stuart noble

They can be stored unwrapped or wrapped in the same environment they are
going to be installed in that is if they are going in a dry heated house
keep them somewhere dry, not out in a shed or under a tarp in the garden or
in the conservatory in full sun. Putting some finish on them or keeping them
wrapped is wise because it will slow the rate at which the wood takes in
moisture or dries out.

Tim W
With the emphasis on "slow". IME nothing stops wood eventually adjusting
its dimensions to suit the ambient conditions. In the case of doors,
because you have no access to mortice and tenon joints, there's a limit
to how effective a seal can be.
 

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