Kenmore Electric Range - Oven & Burners Not Working - Repair Guide


P

Paul Michaels

This past weekend the oven heating element and stove top burners on
our Kenmore electric range stopped working.

I did some quick online research and learned that the problem was most
likely due to a faulty 220V power connection. The appliance was still
getting 110v power because the clock/timer display and LED lights were
still working on the oven control unit.

I spent about 30 minutes checking and tightening all of the
connections and afterwards the 220v power supply was restored and the
range started working properly again.

I took pictures of the whole procedure and created a quick guide to
help out anyone else who may be experiencing the same problem with
their range.

Here's the photo album -
http://www.paulstravelpictures.com/Kenmore-Electric-Range-Burners-Oven-220V-Repair-Guide

Don't forget to unplug everything and turn off the power before you
begin! Good luck.

Cheers,
Paul Michaels
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
 
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S

Stormin Mormon

Thanks for the web page and photos. Many repairs are something simple, as
you have found. Very well done, sir.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


This past weekend the oven heating element and stove top burners on
our Kenmore electric range stopped working.

I did some quick online research and learned that the problem was most
likely due to a faulty 220V power connection. The appliance was still
getting 110v power because the clock/timer display and LED lights were
still working on the oven control unit.

I spent about 30 minutes checking and tightening all of the
connections and afterwards the 220v power supply was restored and the
range started working properly again.

I took pictures of the whole procedure and created a quick guide to
help out anyone else who may be experiencing the same problem with
their range.

Here's the photo album -
http://www.paulstravelpictures.com/Kenmore-Electric-Range-Burners-Oven-220V-Repair-Guide

Don't forget to unplug everything and turn off the power before you
begin! Good luck.

Cheers,
Paul Michaels
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
 
S

Stormin Mormon

* Probably the big plug was dirty. You cleaned it, and now it can flow
electric.
* I don't like Sears. I used to work for them, and didn't like what I saw.
I also don't like the way they make off-spec parts. Sears products often
can't use the usual repair parts by the brands that made the whatever.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


This past weekend the oven heating element and stove top burners on
our Kenmore electric range stopped working.

I did some quick online research and learned that the problem was most
likely due to a faulty 220V power connection. The appliance was still
getting 110v power because the clock/timer display and LED lights were
still working on the oven control unit.

I spent about 30 minutes checking and tightening all of the
connections and afterwards the 220v power supply was restored and the
range started working properly again.

I took pictures of the whole procedure and created a quick guide to
help out anyone else who may be experiencing the same problem with
their range.

Here's the photo album -
http://www.paulstravelpictures.com/Kenmore-Electric-Range-Burners-Oven-220V-Repair-Guide

Don't forget to unplug everything and turn off the power before you
begin! Good luck.

Cheers,
Paul Michaels
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
 
R

RBM

Paul Michaels said:
This past weekend the oven heating element and stove top burners on
our Kenmore electric range stopped working.

I did some quick online research and learned that the problem was most
likely due to a faulty 220V power connection. The appliance was still
getting 110v power because the clock/timer display and LED lights were
still working on the oven control unit.

I spent about 30 minutes checking and tightening all of the
connections and afterwards the 220v power supply was restored and the
range started working properly again.

I took pictures of the whole procedure and created a quick guide to
help out anyone else who may be experiencing the same problem with
their range.

Here's the photo album -
http://www.paulstravelpictures.com/Kenmore-Electric-Range-Burners-Oven-220V-Repair-Guide

Don't forget to unplug everything and turn off the power before you
begin! Good luck.

Cheers,
Paul Michaels
Ft. Lauderdale, FL
You did a very fine job on the site. It is an excellent guide for
determining the locations to look for loose or open connections. I only have
one problem, you never found the smoking gun. If you don't find the
definitive cause and repair it, you can bet it will return. Your pictures
are very clear, and make it apparent where the problem is. The problem is
inside the 50 amp range receptacle, which is what caused the burn on the
prong of the male cord set. At this point, the internal, non serviceable
connection of that part of the outlet is still bad, and unless you replace
the outlet, you can bet the problem will reoccur
 
J

John Grabowski

RBM said:
You did a very fine job on the site. It is an excellent guide for
determining the locations to look for loose or open connections. I only
have one problem, you never found the smoking gun. If you don't find the
definitive cause and repair it, you can bet it will return. Your pictures
are very clear, and make it apparent where the problem is. The problem is
inside the 50 amp range receptacle, which is what caused the burn on the
prong of the male cord set. At this point, the internal, non serviceable
connection of that part of the outlet is still bad, and unless you replace
the outlet, you can bet the problem will reoccur

I agree. It appears that there was no other apparent evidence to suggest
that the problem was anywhere else but in the receptacle. I think that
replacing the receptacle will be good for the long term. Incidentally I
noticed that there was no connector or bushing on the opening where the cord
enters the stove. You should have a connector there to provide strain
relief and more importantly to shield the cord from sharp metal edges.

I applaud you on your thoroughness and safety concerns during the process
and I thank you for taking the time to take pictures so that others may
learn from your experience.
 
S

Stormin Mormon

Remove big black cover. Sand socket contacts with disposable nail file. Gook
with No-Al-Ox and reassemble with a squirt of grey noalox in the socket.
Problem solved for next many years.

Non-servicable, my aunt fannie!

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..



The problem is
inside the 50 amp range receptacle, which is what caused the burn on the
prong of the male cord set. At this point, the internal, non serviceable
connection of that part of the outlet is still bad, and unless you replace
the outlet, you can bet the problem will reoccur
 
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R

RBM

Stormin Mormon said:
Remove big black cover. Sand socket contacts with disposable nail file.
Gook
with No-Al-Ox and reassemble with a squirt of grey noalox in the socket.
Problem solved for next many years.

Non-servicable, my aunt fannie!
This is not a surface mounted receptacle that comes apart. It is a flush
mounted type, riveted together. When a bad electrical contact reaches the
point where you have an open circuit, the metal becomes annealed from
overheating and no longer conducts electricity well, regardless of how much
anti ox paste you lather it in. For the $10 a new outlet costs, it's not
worth wasting time with the old one
 
S

Stormin Mormon

Well, you are there to see it. I'm pleased you got it working again.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..



Stormin Mormon said:
Remove big black cover. Sand socket contacts with disposable nail file.
Gook
with No-Al-Ox and reassemble with a squirt of grey noalox in the socket.
Problem solved for next many years.

Non-servicable, my aunt fannie!
This is not a surface mounted receptacle that comes apart. It is a flush
mounted type, riveted together. When a bad electrical contact reaches the
point where you have an open circuit, the metal becomes annealed from
overheating and no longer conducts electricity well, regardless of how much
anti ox paste you lather it in. For the $10 a new outlet costs, it's not
worth wasting time with the old one
 
J

Jmmv08

Thanks for the link and good info. I will put this in my list. Grea
job
 
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Thank you so much for your step by step (plus photos) solution. Our Kenmore Convection Oven (purchased 2010) stopped heating for the first time after an all-day Thanksgiving cooking the day before. The clock and the little indicator light saying you turned on the burner/oven still worked, except there were no heat. Our fix was tripping the circuit breaker off/on. (First thing we did was unplug the stove cord from the wall and checked all wires after removing the back cover of the stove. My husband remembered he didn't trip the circuit breaker. After he flipped it off, he waited 2 minutes before turning it back on. Voila! It worked.) We were later told by someone that without tripping the circuit breaker it can sometimes lose 50% of its power. That was our problem. Our stove wasn't receiving enough power for the heating element. Thank goodness we saved an $89 service call from Sears.
 
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