Ivy

  • Thread starter Dave Plowman (News)
  • Start date

D

Dave Plowman (News)

Three lots of next door neighbours ago planted an ivy close to our
boundary which of course grew up my side of the semi as well. Didn't much
mind as it looked quite nice.

Current neighbour recently asked me if I'd mind them pruning it. I replied
it was actually theirs, so they didn't have to ask.

With that information, they got a man in who cut it off at the roots and
removed it from their side of the wall leaving the bit on mine to die off.
(rather like the way some paint a wall with a nice straight line where the
boundary is) Which will take some removing and disposing of.

What's the legal position? Only out of interest as I see little of my
neighbours but they are pleasant enough.
 
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O

Owain

With that information, they got a man in who cut it off at the roots and
removed it from their side of the wall leaving the bit on mine to die off..
(rather like the way some paint a wall with a nice straight line where the
boundary is)   Which will take some removing and disposing of.
What's the legal position?  Only out of interest as I see little of my
neighbours but they are pleasant enough.
You didn't give permission for the man to come on your property and
cut the ivy your side of the boundary.

Legally you can cut it and return the bits to the neighbour.

Can you fix a yogurt-pot of weedkiller to the bottom of the remaining
stems and see if that's drawn up into the ivy and kills it? Once it's
dead it will probably pull off the wall in one mesh and burn quite
easily. Personally I've burned it whilst it still on the wall, but
that was for garden walls not house walls :)

Owain
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

Dave said:
Three lots of next door neighbours ago planted an ivy close to our
boundary which of course grew up my side of the semi as well. Didn't much
mind as it looked quite nice.

Current neighbour recently asked me if I'd mind them pruning it. I replied
it was actually theirs, so they didn't have to ask.

With that information, they got a man in who cut it off at the roots and
removed it from their side of the wall leaving the bit on mine to die off.
(rather like the way some paint a wall with a nice straight line where the
boundary is) Which will take some removing and disposing of.

What's the legal position? Only out of interest as I see little of my
neighbours but they are pleasant enough.
Not worth worrying about,

It will be dead and gone in 6 months and then a pressure wash will
remove any residual skank
 
C

Chris Hogg

Three lots of next door neighbours ago planted an ivy close to our
boundary which of course grew up my side of the semi as well. Didn't much
mind as it looked quite nice.

Current neighbour recently asked me if I'd mind them pruning it. I replied
it was actually theirs, so they didn't have to ask.

With that information, they got a man in who cut it off at the roots and
removed it from their side of the wall leaving the bit on mine to die off.
(rather like the way some paint a wall with a nice straight line where the
boundary is) Which will take some removing and disposing of.

What's the legal position? Only out of interest as I see little of my
neighbours but they are pleasant enough.
Don't know the legal position in detail, but it's their ivy, and in
this hot weather it will shrive in a week or so provided it's had its
trunk severed, and you can then pull it off your wall fairly easily
and give it back to them.
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

You didn't give permission for the man to come on your property and cut
the ivy your side of the boundary.
I wasn't asked. Had I known they intended killing it of course I'd have
given permission.
Legally you can cut it and return the bits to the neighbour.
Can you fix a yogurt-pot of weedkiller to the bottom of the remaining
stems and see if that's drawn up into the ivy and kills it? Once it's
dead it will probably pull off the wall in one mesh and burn quite
easily. Personally I've burned it whilst it still on the wall, but
that was for garden walls not house walls :)
It's already well and truly dead.
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

Chris said:
Don't know the legal position in detail, but it's their ivy, and in
this hot weather it will shrive in a week or so provided it's had its
trunk severed, and you can then pull it off your wall fairly easily
and give it back to them.
Yes. Actually it takes a fair bit longer than that BUT it will die. It
wont fall off but once dead the adhesion to the wall is much much less.
 
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S

ss

Yes. Actually it takes a fair bit longer than that BUT it will die. It
wont fall off but once dead the adhesion to the wall is much much less.
I planted some ivy a few years back then decided I didnt want it so cut
the `trunk` most of it was still hanging on the gable end 10 years later
although to be fair it pulled off easily enough, I just didnt want to go
up a ladder for the higher stuff.
 
B

Brian Gaff

Sounds like the removal person was an idiot. I do know that Ivy eventually
can destroy a wall, at least according to a make over program i was
unfortunate enough to hear about two months back. its those little things it
puts into the wall to hold itself up.
Brian
 
T

Tim Watts

The said:
Yes. Actually it takes a fair bit longer than that BUT it will die. It
wont fall off but once dead the adhesion to the wall is much much less.
Yes - once the tendrils have shrilled and dried, it will pull off pretty
easily.
 
M

Martin Brown

Three lots of next door neighbours ago planted an ivy close to our
boundary which of course grew up my side of the semi as well. Didn't much
mind as it looked quite nice.

Current neighbour recently asked me if I'd mind them pruning it. I replied
it was actually theirs, so they didn't have to ask.

With that information, they got a man in who cut it off at the roots and
removed it from their side of the wall leaving the bit on mine to die off.
(rather like the way some paint a wall with a nice straight line where the
boundary is) Which will take some removing and disposing of.

What's the legal position? Only out of interest as I see little of my
neighbours but they are pleasant enough.
ISTR in theory you are supposed to offer the prunings to them as
firewood/kindling. In practice almost no one ever bothers or wants it.

If you want a nice replacement climber try hydrangea petiolaris which is
self attaching but much less vigorous and damaging to brickwork - nice
flowers too and will tolerate a north facing wall.
 
S

stuart noble

ISTR in theory you are supposed to offer the prunings to them as
firewood/kindling. In practice almost no one ever bothers or wants it.

If you want a nice replacement climber try hydrangea petiolaris which is
self attaching but much less vigorous and damaging to brickwork - nice
flowers too and will tolerate a north facing wall.
I took a huge ivy, some 30 years old at least, off a Victorian yellow
brick wall with lime mortar pointing. No damage to the bricks, but it
did get under the slate tiles, which was a bigger problem.
 
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G

Grimly Curmudgeon

If you want a nice replacement climber try hydrangea petiolaris which is
self attaching but much less vigorous and damaging to brickwork - nice
flowers too and will tolerate a north facing wall.
I prefer no easy ladders for bugs and crawlies at all.
 
S

ss

I prefer no easy ladders for bugs and crawlies at all.
Another reason I `killed` mine was the airbrick vents about a foot above
ground level had shoots growing into them, when I pulled these out they
must have been about 20 feet long, I would imagine searching for water,
hell knows where they went to under the house but I sold the house last
year and never did find out.
 
T

Tim W

Three lots of next door neighbours ago planted an ivy close to our
boundary which of course grew up my side of the semi as well. Didn't much
mind as it looked quite nice.

Current neighbour recently asked me if I'd mind them pruning it. I replied
it was actually theirs, so they didn't have to ask.

With that information, they got a man in who cut it off at the roots and
removed it from their side of the wall leaving the bit on mine to die off.
(rather like the way some paint a wall with a nice straight line where the
boundary is) Which will take some removing and disposing of.

What's the legal position? Only out of interest as I see little of my
neighbours but they are pleasant enough.

The legal position is that no court will waste it's time with it.

Tim W
 
R

Roberts

Tim W said:
The legal position is that no court will waste it's time with it.

Tim W
I am surprised nobody has suggested an angle grinder!
My climbing hydrangea is almost as much trouble as ivy. I cut it back to
keep it out of the tiles and now it has spread sideways covering a large
part of the side of the house. I live in a semi detached house!

Robbie >
 
D

djc

Another reason I `killed` mine was the airbrick vents about a foot above
ground level had shoots growing into them, when I pulled these out they
must have been about 20 feet long, I would imagine searching for water,
hell knows where they went to under the house but I sold the house last
year and never did find out.

Perhaps not a great risk in the English climate but: even a plant ivy
will contain a lot of dry dead leaves and in a dry spell could be a fire
risk. My neighbour was burning some garden rubbish when he set fire to
the next doors wall. By the time he had turned on the garden hose it was
already obvious the fire brigade needed calling.
 
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T

The Natural Philosopher

djc said:
Perhaps not a great risk in the English climate but: even a plant ivy
will contain a lot of dry dead leaves and in a dry spell could be a fire
risk. My neighbour was burning some garden rubbish when he set fire to
the next doors wall. By the time he had turned on the garden hose it was
already obvious the fire brigade needed calling.
Good point.
 
A

Andy Dingley

It will be dead and gone in 6 months and then a pressure wash will
remove any residual skank
I've got a similar problem (although it's my ivy). Clearing the remains of the severed, dead ivy from the top of the wall would (if done to commercialstandards) require scaffolding to reach it, above the ladder-unfriendly protruding fragile roof of the lean-to below. I can't even get to it with a cherry picker, as the ground is too soft and uneven.

If this was someone else's ivy causing me this trouble, I'd be well unhappy..
 
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O

Owain

Perhaps not a great risk in the English climate but: even a plant ivy
will contain a lot of dry dead leaves and in a dry spell could be a fire
risk. My neighbour was burning some garden rubbish when he set fire to
the next doors wall. By the time he had turned on the garden hose it was
already obvious the fire brigade needed calling.
Mine went up with a very satisfying crackly noise (and set off all the
smoke alarms in the building) :)

Owain
 
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