Ivy


J

John

I have ivy growing up the side of my garage and every now and again I have
to cut / rip it back as it gets into the eaves and into the guttering. When
I get around to it I find it messy and hard work and the ivy looks a mess
for a while. I am wondering if anyone has any tips (with tools used) to keep
it maintained at about a foot below the eaves.
 
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A

Andrew Gabriel

I have ivy growing up the side of my garage and every now and again I have
to cut / rip it back as it gets into the eaves and into the guttering. When
I get around to it I find it messy and hard work and the ivy looks a mess
for a while. I am wondering if anyone has any tips (with tools used) to keep
it maintained at about a foot below the eaves.
I have ivy growing up some fences. It's self seeded, but I quite like it.
I trim it with the hedge cutter. I overheard something on Gardener's
Questiontime where they said to keep it looking trim and tidy, make sure
you trim it back at least every 2 years. After 2 year's growth, the
branches become more woody as bearers for new branches, rather than
for supporting leafy folliage directly. If you end up with just the
bearer branches left, it will recover, but it will look bare until it
does. I also observe that when trimmed, you get a dense covering of
small leaves, whereas when not trimmed you get a less dense covering
of larger leaves; I prefer the former.

However, I do keep it off the brickwork, as it leaves a horrible mess
if you decide to remove it later, and I'm not sure I want it forever.
 
G

Guest

John said:
I have ivy growing up the side of my garage and every now and again I have
to cut / rip it back as it gets into the eaves and into the guttering. When
I get around to it I find it messy and hard work and the ivy looks a mess
for a while. I am wondering if anyone has any tips (with tools used) to
keep it maintained at about a foot below the eaves.
So do I, but it is somehow, quite satisfying peeling it back now and again.

Thinking about it, and depending on how tough your concrete is, it might
just be possible to use a power washer on fine jet to cut a line more
reasonably through the new growth each year.
Or, perhaps even a plastic line strimmer might reach up there and cut you a
neat line to rip back to.

S
 
N

NT

John said:
I have ivy growing up the side of my garage and every now and again I have
to cut / rip it back as it gets into the eaves and into the guttering. When
I get around to it I find it messy and hard work and the ivy looks a mess
for a while. I am wondering if anyone has any tips (with tools used) to keep
it maintained at about a foot below the eaves.
Just cut through the stems there, job done. no need to battle with
pulling it off. The old wood does remove itself over time.


NT
 
G

Guest

NT said:
Just cut through the stems there, job done. no need to battle with
pulling it off. The old wood does remove itself over time.
And you have untidy brown ivy and a fire risk instead. No substitute far
taking a bit of care now and again.

S
 
A

Adrian C

I have ivy growing up the side of my garage and every now and again I have
to cut / rip it back as it gets into the eaves and into the guttering. When
I get around to it I find it messy and hard work and the ivy looks a mess
for a while. I am wondering if anyone has any tips (with tools used) to keep
it maintained at about a foot below the eaves.
Remove it and find another plant? I've seen a recommendation here for
Passion Flower Fruit? which sounds interesting ....

My nasty 75 yr old neighbour is unrelenting in growing Ivy, and has made
a wall of it inbetween our two gardens. So it becomes a chore for us to
cut our side back. Hate the stuff :-(

I'm kind of thinking of boarding it over with a six foot wooden panel
and hopefully killing half the light the plant gets.

<OT rant>

Previously this idiot grew Ivy on our extension wall which faces him, by
nailing (and latter cementing) trellis to our wall. Thankfully when he
called the Police to make a silly non-related complaint about us, we
sent the plods back over to set him right on his Ivy menace, and now a
fence has been errected.

Last month, we awoke to find rose bushes at the front of our house have
been vandalised. It's obviously him, but I'm a bit narked that the only
response the Police have is that we should install CCTV... :-(

</OT rant>
 
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S

stuart noble

Adrian said:
Remove it and find another plant? I've seen a recommendation here for
Passion Flower Fruit? which sounds interesting ....
A rampant climber but needs to face south and have something to cling to
because it doesn't have suckers like ivy. Looks a right mess in the
winter mind
 
G

Guest

Adrian C said:
Remove it and find another plant? I've seen a recommendation here for
Passion Flower Fruit? which sounds interesting ....

My nasty 75 yr old neighbour is unrelenting in growing Ivy, and has made a
wall of it inbetween our two gardens. So it becomes a chore for us to cut
our side back. Hate the stuff :-(

I'm kind of thinking of boarding it over with a six foot wooden panel and
hopefully killing half the light the plant gets.

<OT rant>

Previously this idiot grew Ivy on our extension wall which faces him, by
nailing (and latter cementing) trellis to our wall. Thankfully when he
called the Police to make a silly non-related complaint about us, we sent
the plods back over to set him right on his Ivy menace, and now a fence
has been errected.

Last month, we awoke to find rose bushes at the front of our house have
been vandalised. It's obviously him, but I'm a bit narked that the only
response the Police have is that we should install CCTV... :-(

Adrian C
Even with 'global warming' I would not rely on passion fruit - especially
with a cold winter like the one we just had. It would need a trellis too as
it is not clinging like ivy.

Shame you are not getting on with your neighbour. Ours, has a huge
extension which really spoils our garden with an unsightly bare and badly
pointed wall. This was at one time partly hidden with the dreadful Russian
ivy, which has huge leaves and takes over even the dreaded Leylandii when it
'gets out'. This foreign ivy knocked our garden shed over, but it may have
started out as a planning condition, because otherwise I can't understand
how it was ever granted. Anyhow, it took several years to finally (?)
defeat the invader, and the new neighbour has been invited over to see the
problem from this side. He agreed to let me put some vine eyes in the wall,
and now I am training an espalier apple and a loquat to hide the nasty
bricks, and I've straightened and strengthened the shed roof so I can stand
on it to prune. It was just beginning to look nice when the snow rather
flattened it; but it's better for both parties, than the monster foreign
ivy.

On the other hand, our English ivy is probably the most useful thing in the
garden. The flowers in the autumn are alive with bees and butterflies, when
there are few other nectar sources about. Then later the birds rely on it
for fruit and shelter. It gives us some cover when there are no leaves on
the trees, or our garden would be very exposed indeed. It is a small price
to pay to have to trim it now and then - though it does get more difficult
as one ages, sadly.

Perhaps your neighbour is not so much unrelenting, as unable to keep up any
longer. Could an offer of a little help solve both your problems perhaps?
For a reasonably fit person, ordinary ivy is fairly easy to trim, after all,
and is very good at covering eyesores like your 6ft panel might eventually
prove to be. For a 75y old, things may not be so easy, and it sounds like
he has good cause to consider your extension as much of an intrusion as you
see his ivy. Who knows, perhaps your passion fruit idea on his trellis,
might solve both your problems.

Must be worth a try,

S
 
A

Adrian C

Shame you are not getting on with your neighbour.
It is. It's also beyond any neighbour counselling effort offered by the
council/police. :-(

Ours, has a huge
extension which really spoils our garden with an unsightly bare and badly
pointed wall. This was at one time partly hidden with the dreadful Russian
ivy, which has huge leaves and takes over even the dreaded Leylandii when it
'gets out'. This foreign ivy knocked our garden shed over, but it may have
started out as a planning condition, because otherwise I can't understand
how it was ever granted. Anyhow, it took several years to finally (?)
defeat the invader, and the new neighbour has been invited over to see the
problem from this side.
Good for you, but unfortunately our idiot is just nasty. The 'Local
Nutter' Full stop. Gets kicks from making other peoples lives miserable
including his poor long suffering wife :-(
Perhaps your neighbour is not so much unrelenting, as unable to keep up any
longer.
Nope, very fit and able. :-(

Our plans for that extension were delayed because he put in a claim for
'loss of light', and also posted us a letter demanding £2000 then he
would withdraw it. Worth noting that at the time of that the ivy over
most his property did a good job of blocking his light anyway, and it
was just pure cussedness on his part.

Never mind, I'm used to blanking the abuse.

One day we are going to rip out his ailing and insecure fence and do a
new 6-foot one down the rear garden (just inside our side). CCTV will be
going up before that operation just to record his antics of retaliation,
because it will probably be coming :-(
 
G

Guest

Adrian C said:
It is. It's also beyond any neighbour counselling effort offered by the
council/police. :-(

Ours, has a huge

Good for you, but unfortunately our idiot is just nasty. The 'Local
Nutter' Full stop. Gets kicks from making other peoples lives miserable
including his poor long suffering wife :-(


Nope, very fit and able. :-(

Our plans for that extension were delayed because he put in a claim for
'loss of light', and also posted us a letter demanding £2000 then he would
withdraw it. Worth noting that at the time of that the ivy over most his
property did a good job of blocking his light anyway, and it was just pure
cussedness on his part.

Never mind, I'm used to blanking the abuse.

One day we are going to rip out his ailing and insecure fence and do a new
6-foot one down the rear garden (just inside our side). CCTV will be going
up before that operation just to record his antics of retaliation, because
it will probably be coming :-(
Sorry to hear that Adrian. Makes me a bit jealous cos there's lots of jobs
I want to get on with but I'm not fit enough to do them at the moment (hence
my increased presence in these columns lately), and I'm not as old as your
neighbour yet (Though I might be by the time the NHS gets its finger out!).

Still at least the sun is shining lately.

Cheers,
S
 
A

Adrian C

Sorry to hear that Adrian. Makes me a bit jealous cos there's lots of jobs
I want to get on with but I'm not fit enough to do them at the moment (hence
my increased presence in these columns lately), and I'm not as old as your
neighbour yet (Though I might be by the time the NHS gets its finger out!).
Aye, the neighbour's probably fitter than me - and I'm only slightly
older than the prime minister...

Take it slow and enjoy is me motto, great things come to those who wait
etc... When the NHS gets around to you, celebrate and rejoice! ;-)
Still at least the sun is shining lately.
Which is a problem ATM, rant #2. It's stopped me fixing things to the
garage roof. Too hot. And previosly when it's not hot, it's wet. Then
another issue getting to do stuff on the roof. Slippery moss (and no
roofing ladders). And then there is the wind, cold and snow. Him
upstairs doesn't want me on this roof!

And last year (when this UPVC cladding, guttering and aerial mast / dish
mounting project started) when the weather was just right for rooftop
climbing, we had busy wasps nests to get rid off. That became another
project in itself.

So last year, this wimp procrastinated big time, and did nothing except
moved the wasps out ;-(

I find this weather is better enjoyed inside in the shade of the garage
workshop, where the insulation I have installed works wonders in keeping
the place cool, I'm nearly out of earshot of demands from the others,
and today I can enjoy the spoils of tat gained from the Dunstable Radio
Club car boot sale visited yesterday.

Things purchased for projects that I know will never happen.

The motto -
"He who gets buried under the largest clump of junk wins..."

:)
 
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G

Grimly Curmudgeon

We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
I have ivy growing up the side of my garage and every now and again I have
to cut / rip it back as it gets into the eaves and into the guttering. When
I get around to it I find it messy and hard work and the ivy looks a mess
for a while. I am wondering if anyone has any tips (with tools used) to keep
it maintained at about a foot below the eaves.
Some gimp on Radio4 was wittering on about how nice ivy was and it
should be left to grow all over. Oh yes, the insulation value of it,
too. Failed to mention the open access for insects it provides.
I chop it off as soon as I see it - horrible stuff.
 
G

Grimly Curmudgeon

We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
I'm kind of thinking of boarding it over with a six foot wooden panel
and hopefully killing half the light the plant gets.
Round-Up.
 
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G

Guest

Adrian C said:
Aye, the neighbour's probably fitter than me - and I'm only slightly older
than the prime minister...

Take it slow and enjoy is me motto, great things come to those who wait
etc... When the NHS gets around to you, celebrate and rejoice! ;-)


Which is a problem ATM, rant #2. It's stopped me fixing things to the
garage roof. Too hot. And previosly when it's not hot, it's wet. Then
another issue getting to do stuff on the roof. Slippery moss (and no
roofing ladders). And then there is the wind, cold and snow. Him upstairs
doesn't want me on this roof!

And last year (when this UPVC cladding, guttering and aerial mast / dish
mounting project started) when the weather was just right for rooftop
climbing, we had busy wasps nests to get rid off. That became another
project in itself.

So last year, this wimp procrastinated big time, and did nothing except
moved the wasps out ;-(

I find this weather is better enjoyed inside in the shade of the garage
workshop, where the insulation I have installed works wonders in keeping
the place cool, I'm nearly out of earshot of demands from the others, and
today I can enjoy the spoils of tat gained from the Dunstable Radio Club
car boot sale visited yesterday.

Things purchased for projects that I know will never happen.

The motto -
"He who gets buried under the largest clump of junk wins..."

:)
Adrian C
Ah, I'd forgotten about those sales. I think in the early days of home
computing I attended one at Stockwood park and was utterly baffled by the
rows and rows of incomprehensible stuff people were drooling over!

Incidentally, being an utter coward where roofs are concerned, when I have
had to get up - even on a low house - I've generally thrown a rope right
over and tied it to an upstairs window the other side, so I have something
to hold on to. You just have to remember not to walk right over the
ridge... ;-)

S
 

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