Is Rough Opening On The Same Plane?


D

DerbyDad03

I was reading the installation instructions for my ThermaTru entry
door found at:

http://www.thermatru.com/pdfs/installation/InstallationInstruction.pdf

Besides the standard level, plumb and square checks, they also
mentioned this:

*** Begin Stolen Text ***

Check to be sure the framing walls around the opening are in the same
plane. Do this by performing a “string test” for plumb.

String Test for Plumb: Attach a string diagonally across the opening
from the outside, as shown. The string(s) should gently touch in the
center, if not the opening is “out of plumb” by twice that distance
and needs to be corrected. Flip the string over itself to check both
planes. Fix any problems now.

An “out of plumb” condition is one of the most common reasons door
units leak air and water.

*** End Stolen Text ***

It seems to me that the same check should be done for windows, but I
never saw this mentioned in any window installation instructions. I
know that besides checking the opening we should also check the window/
door itself before (and after) cranking down on the mounting screws,
but I've never seen this "Same Plane" check mentioned before.

Thoughts?
 
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D

dpb

DerbyDad03 wrote:
....
It seems to me that the same check should be done for windows, but I
never saw this mentioned in any window installation instructions. I
know that besides checking the opening we should also check the window/
door itself before (and after) cranking down on the mounting screws,
but I've never seen this "Same Plane" check mentioned before.

Thoughts?
What's to thought about?

--
 
J

jamesgangnc

I was reading the installation instructions for my ThermaTru entry
door found at:

http://www.thermatru.com/pdfs/installation/InstallationInstruction.pdf

Besides the standard level, plumb and square checks, they also
mentioned this:

*** Begin Stolen Text ***

Check to be sure the framing walls around the opening are in the same
plane. Do this by performing a “string test” for plumb.

String Test for Plumb: Attach a string diagonally across the opening
from the outside, as shown. The string(s) should gently touch in the
center, if not the opening is “out of plumb” by twice that distance
and needs to be corrected. Flip the string over itself to check both
planes. Fix any problems now.

An “out of plumb” condition is one of the most common reasons door
units leak air and water.

*** End Stolen Text ***

It seems to me that the same check should be done for windows, but I
never saw this mentioned in any window installation instructions. I
know that besides checking the opening we should also check the window/
door itself before (and after) cranking down on the mounting screws,
but I've never seen this "Same Plane" check mentioned before.

Thoughts?
Happens more on doors because the bottom is "open". Windows are part
of the wall on all 4 sides. I was taught to frame a door by leaving
the sole plate in the door space until the wall is nailed in. Then
come back and cut it out at the door rough opening. But not everyone
does that.
 
D

DerbyDad03

Happens more on doors because the bottom is "open".  Windows are part
of the wall on all 4 sides.  I was taught to frame a door by leaving
the sole plate in the door space until the wall is nailed in.  Then
come back and cut it out at the door rough opening.  But not everyone
does that.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
re: Windows are part of the wall on all 4 sides.

But the sides of the rough opening could still be on different planes.

re: Then come back and cut (the sill plate) out at the door rough
opening

But the sides of the rough opening could still be on different planes.
 
O

Oren

I was reading the installation instructions for my ThermaTru entry
door found at:

http://www.thermatru.com/pdfs/installation/InstallationInstruction.pdf

Besides the standard level, plumb and square checks, they also
mentioned this:

*** Begin Stolen Text ***

Check to be sure the framing walls around the opening are in the same
plane. Do this by performing a “string test” for plumb.

String Test for Plumb: Attach a string diagonally across the opening
from the outside, as shown. The string(s) should gently touch in the
center, if not the opening is “out of plumb” by twice that distance
and needs to be corrected. Flip the string over itself to check both
planes. Fix any problems now.

An “out of plumb” condition is one of the most common reasons door
units leak air and water.

*** End Stolen Text ***

It seems to me that the same check should be done for windows, but I
never saw this mentioned in any window installation instructions. I
know that besides checking the opening we should also check the window/
door itself before (and after) cranking down on the mounting screws,
but I've never seen this "Same Plane" check mentioned before.

Thoughts?
This is the first time I've read about performing a "String Test for
Plumb". I'll ponder this one :-/

Even with expensive Andersen doors, it is/was not in the install
instructions.
 
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O

Oren

Me either. I suppose they mean 'square'.
Horizontal is level
Vertical is plumb.
BTW. The symbol for lead is PB, which is short for the Latin word
plumbum. Plumbing, plumber, plumb and plumb-bob all derive from the
Latin word, since most plumbing was lead based in early history.
Maybe the string test is to check for "Kitty wampus" of the RO or
"catty-corner" of the wall :-/
 
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