Installing Manual Transfer Switch/Generator Advice


N

noname

Going to install a transfer switch so I can run a generator to power oil furnace, refrigerator, and a couple of other devices (maybe TV/ Microwave).

Will a 5000 watt peak generator do the trick? Any advice on brands (don't want to break the bank)?

Transfer switch for this seems a straight forward install (house is only 6 years old). Just kill the power and wire up a few breakers. I assume someone fairly handy can do this yes? (did plenty of home wiring in our old house) Was thinking 6 circuit Reliance transfer switch (20 or 30 amp) woulddo the trick.

Thanks for any advice!
 
P

Paul Drahn

Going to install a transfer switch so I can run a generator to power oil furnace, refrigerator, and a couple of other devices (maybe TV/ Microwave).

Will a 5000 watt peak generator do the trick? Any advice on brands (don't want to break the bank)?

Transfer switch for this seems a straight forward install (house is only 6 years old). Just kill the power and wire up a few breakers. I assume someone fairly handy can do this yes? (did plenty of home wiring in our old house) Was thinking 6 circuit Reliance transfer switch (20 or 30 amp) would do the trick.

Thanks for any advice!
Ok, here is some advice!
Do you own you house free and clear? If so, go ahead and do it yourself.
If there is a problem and your insurance won't pay, you are out the money.

If you have a mortgage and you have a serious problem with the switch or
your wiring and the insurance won't pay, your mortgage holder will
probably require you to pay off the balance immediately and make them
not liable for any losses.

Get it installed professionally. Not that expensive.

Paul
 
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P

Pavel314

Going to install a transfer switch so I can run a generator to power oil furnace, refrigerator, and a couple of other devices (maybe TV/ Microwave).



Will a 5000 watt peak generator do the trick? Any advice on brands (don't want to break the bank)?



Transfer switch for this seems a straight forward install (house is only 6 years old). Just kill the power and wire up a few breakers. I assume someone fairly handy can do this yes? (did plenty of home wiring in our old house) Was thinking 6 circuit Reliance transfer switch (20 or 30 amp) would do the trick.



Thanks for any advice!
We have a 5,500 watt generator. I ran lines from the generator to the well pump for water, the oil-fired water heater, the oil furnace, the refrigerator and the freezer. It keeps them all going but I have to unplug each from the house current and plug them into the generator lines when the power goes out. Plus we have a spare extention cord that can be plugged into one of the microwave, coffe maker, reading lamp, etc., as needed.

I wired this all myself but wouldn't install a transfer switch myself. I plan to get a larger generator with a transfer switch next year, having a professional electrician do the hookup for insurance and safety considerations..

Paul
 
G

gregz

Pavel314 said:
We have a 5,500 watt generator. I ran lines from the generator to the
well pump for water, the oil-fired water heater, the oil furnace, the
refrigerator and the freezer. It keeps them all going but I have to
unplug each from the house current and plug them into the generator lines
when the power goes out. Plus we have a spare extention cord that can be
plugged into one of the microwave, coffe maker, reading lamp, etc., as needed.

I wired this all myself but wouldn't install a transfer switch myself. I
plan to get a larger generator with a transfer switch next year, having a
professional electrician do the hookup for insurance and safety considerations.

Paul
I think I could wire a plug for my furnace. As it is, from the breaker,
goes to box on furnace, then hardwired to furnace circuit.

Really, thought about turning breaker off, then run reverse plug from
generator to box....


Greg
 
M

micky

Going to install a transfer switch so I can run a generator to power oil furnace, refrigerator, and a couple of other devices (maybe TV/ Microwave).

Will a 5000 watt peak generator do the trick? Any advice on brands (don't want to break the bank)?

Transfer switch for this seems a straight forward install (house is only 6 years old). Just kill the power and wire up a few breakers. I assume someone fairly handy can do this yes? (did plenty of home wiring in our old house) Was thinking 6 circuit Reliance transfer switch (20 or 30 amp) would do the trick.
I don't know nuthin' but how can a 30 amp switch be enough for a 5000
watt generator, peak or not.?
 
G

gregz

micky said:
I don't know nuthin' but how can a 30 amp switch be enough for a 5000
watt generator, peak or not.?
My 6000 watt peak aldi generator has two 20 amp 120 volt outputs, or the
240 volt output plug. Ill have to see the generator breakers rating though.
30 amp would be more than enough.

Greg
 
M

mike

How did you hook up the furnace without a transfer switch?
Depends on where you live.
In the US, code appears to clearly state that the furnace
must be permanently attached. But the consensus appears to
be that it's routinely ignored.
When I asked the local electrical inspector, he didn't even
know about it and said he would approve a plug.
YMMV
 
F

Frank

It sounds wise, to have a pro do the transfer switch. Ideally, you can have
the electrician wire a 15 amp socket on the utility power side of that
switch. Plug in a lamp, and a radio (old type with the knobs, and set it to
full volume) so you know when the utility power comes back on.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.

"Pavel314" <pintiha@jhmi.edu>
wrote in message

We have a 5,500 watt generator. I ran lines from the generator to the well
pump for water, the oil-fired water heater, the oil furnace, the
refrigerator and the freezer. It keeps them all going but I have to unplug
each from the house current and plug them into the generator lines when the
power goes out. Plus we have a spare extention cord that can be plugged into
one of the microwave, coffe maker, reading lamp, etc., as needed.

I wired this all myself but wouldn't install a transfer switch myself. I
plan to get a larger generator with a transfer switch next year, having a
professional electrician do the hookup for insurance and safety
considerations.

Paul
Transfer box for my generator contains switch where box controls items I
have wired, well, furnace, refrigerator, freezers and some lights and
TV. When power comes back, items that were not on transfer box come
back on, i.e. any thing that had been powered on and went off turns back on.

I had mine done professionally where they had also replaced old, unsafe
breaker box. Cost was not excessive.
 
N

noname

There is only one breaker to the furnace. This means killing that breaker I could manually wire up the furnace without fear of feed back, right?
 
B

bud--

Going to install a transfer switch so I can run a generator to power oil furnace, refrigerator, and a couple of other devices (maybe TV/ Microwave).

Will a 5000 watt peak generator do the trick? Any advice on brands (don't want to break the bank)?

Transfer switch for this seems a straight forward install (house is only 6 years old). Just kill the power and wire up a few breakers. I assume someone fairly handy can do this yes? (did plenty of home wiring in our old house) Was thinking 6 circuit Reliance transfer switch (20 or 30 amp) would do the trick.

Thanks for any advice!
Probably the cheapest way to do a transfer switch is an interlock kit:
http://www.interlockkit.com/CATALOG2008.pdf
(originally from John Grabowski)

You put a circuit breaker in the panel adjacent to the service
disconnect and back feed it from the generator. There is a mechanical
interlock mechanism on the panel cover that prevents both the service
disconnect and generator breaker from being on at the same time. You
turn on only what you want to run at a particular time and the generator
can handle.

The code also wants a simple mechanism from the manufacturer that
prevents the backfed generator breaker from unplugging.
 
P

Pavel314

How did you hook up the furnace without a transfer switch?
Originally, the power line from the furnace went to a junction box on a joist above the furnace, where it joined a house current line from the breakerbox. I disconnected that junction in the box and connected the house current line from the breaker box to a plug outlet which I mounted in the box. Ithen put a plug on the line from the furnace and plugged it into the outlet in the junction box.

When the power goes out, I unplug the furnace line from the house current box and plug it into a line coming from the generator. I did the same with the well pump and the water heater.

Paul
 
P

Pavel314

I ran Romex from the generator to the furnace, with a plug at the furnace end of the line. Unplug from house current, plug into generator line.

Paul
 
N

noname

Current thinking is to install an Interlock kit. Looks like for my GE breaker panel it costs $149. Going to call my electrician to see how much he will charge to install it. Seems more difficult to install than a transfer switch.
 
N

noname

It seems "GE PowerMark Gold Load Center/Generator Interlock Kit" for $43, plus a "Reliance Controls 20-Amp Power Inlet Box" for $51 plus the wire and generator cable is all that I would need, right?

All the breakers I would turn on are 120 volt 20 amp ones. Is that the correct inlet box I would need for a 5000 watt generator?

Thanks.
 
G

gregz

noname said:
It seems "GE PowerMark Gold Load Center/Generator Interlock Kit" for $43,
plus a "Reliance Controls 20-Amp Power Inlet Box" for $51 plus the wire
and generator cable is all that I would need, right?

All the breakers I would turn on are 120 volt 20 amp ones. Is that the
correct inlet box I would need for a 5000 watt generator?

Thanks.
I would like to see an overall diagram.

Of course, I'm interested.

Greg
 
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T

trader4

Why a transfer switch? Two extension cords, one for the furnace and one for
everything else, should be ample. Even if you install it yourself, a
transfer switch will set you back $200-$300. If you have a licensed, union,
professional install it, what with the possible permits and inspections, you
may be north of $1,000.

A couple of 100' extension cords will set you back less than a hundred
bucks.

The transfer switch is a no-fuss option allowing you to run (usually) up to
six circuits with the flip of a single switch. Seems to me that after
uncovering the generator in the garage, hauling it out into the air,
charging it with gas, and otherwise fussing around, uncoiling two extension
cards doesn't add much to the project.
Except that you're overlooking the rest of the issues:

1 - You still have to do re-wiring at the furnace. And the result is
usually one
that does not meet code, eg the furnace is now on a cord.
If it does meet code, it's not that much more work and
the same skill set to install an inlet and appropriate code compliant
double pole arrangement back at the panel.

2 - With the panel arrangement, you can then selectively power
whatever you
want in the house. Want to turn on a light in that upstairs closet
to get some clothes? A light in the upstairs bedroom? The gas water
heater? All that is available without running more extension cords.

3 - With the ext cord arrangement, you have to get at the appliance
cord. That means at a min rolling out fridges. And if it's built-in
like some are, you can't roll it out.....

4 - With the panel arangement, you can also power a well pump, if
you have one.

I'm sure there are other issues, but you get the idea....
 

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