Installing flat screen TV over gas fireplace - power and cable questions


A

AngryOldWhiteGuy

I'm OK with how to wall mount a flat screen TV - this one will be mounted on
a wall over the gas fireplace - it's a small fireplace with an insert for
the firebox and a metal flue - not a traditional all brick fireplace - what
I'm wondering about is how to hide the power and cable lines behind the
wall - the current cable line comes in through the outside wall about 5 - 6
feet over from where I wanna mount the new TV - that's where the current
wall socket power outlet is, too. I can't see getting over horizontally
from the current locations to the new TV - I'd have to cross through the
vertical studs behind the sheetrock.

Any ideas, besides calling a professional?

Thanks!
 
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R

RBM

I'm OK with how to wall mount a flat screen TV - this one will be mounted on
a wall over the gas fireplace - it's a small fireplace with an insert for
the firebox and a metal flue - not a traditional all brick fireplace - what
I'm wondering about is how to hide the power and cable lines behind the
wall - the current cable line comes in through the outside wall about 5 - 6
feet over from where I wanna mount the new TV - that's where the current
wall socket power outlet is, too. I can't see getting over horizontally
from the current locations to the new TV - I'd have to cross through the
vertical studs behind the sheetrock.

Any ideas, besides calling a professional?

Thanks!
You need to get a game plan . You have to run a cable for power to a
location behind the tv, but in many cases the coax cable goes to your
cable box not directly to the tv. Depending upon your setup, you'd run
HDMI, composite, or component cables from your cable box, dvd, vcr, dvr,
etc. to the TV
 
T

Tony Hwang

AngryOldWhiteGuy said:
I'm OK with how to wall mount a flat screen TV - this one will be mounted on
a wall over the gas fireplace - it's a small fireplace with an insert for
the firebox and a metal flue - not a traditional all brick fireplace - what
I'm wondering about is how to hide the power and cable lines behind the
wall - the current cable line comes in through the outside wall about 5 - 6
feet over from where I wanna mount the new TV - that's where the current
wall socket power outlet is, too. I can't see getting over horizontally
from the current locations to the new TV - I'd have to cross through the
vertical studs behind the sheetrock.

Any ideas, besides calling a professional?

Thanks!
Hmmm.
I don't understand mounting TV high. Best watching TV position is when
viewed little lower than eye level.
 
B

Bob F

AngryOldWhiteGuy said:
I'm OK with how to wall mount a flat screen TV - this one will be
mounted on a wall over the gas fireplace - it's a small fireplace
with an insert for the firebox and a metal flue - not a traditional
all brick fireplace - what I'm wondering about is how to hide the
power and cable lines behind the wall - the current cable line comes
in through the outside wall about 5 - 6 feet over from where I wanna
mount the new TV - that's where the current wall socket power outlet
is, too. I can't see getting over horizontally from the current
locations to the new TV - I'd have to cross through the vertical
studs behind the sheetrock.
Any ideas, besides calling a professional?
I'd use a 6' flex drill bit.
 
J

jw

I'm OK with how to wall mount a flat screen TV - this one will be mounted on
a wall over the gas fireplace - it's a small fireplace with an insert for
the firebox and a metal flue - not a traditional all brick fireplace - what
I'm wondering about is how to hide the power and cable lines behind the
wall - the current cable line comes in through the outside wall about 5 - 6
feet over from where I wanna mount the new TV - that's where the current
wall socket power outlet is, too. I can't see getting over horizontally
from the current locations to the new TV - I'd have to cross through the
vertical studs behind the sheetrock.

Any ideas, besides calling a professional?

Thanks!
Heat is the biggest destroyer of modern electronics. Thats why they
put large heat sinks and fans in things like tv sets, computers, etc.
Even a small fireplace will pump the heat into that tv, and will
greatly shorten the life of the tv, as well as possibly warping
plastic on the case or even the screen. What you want to do is just
plain stupid. You have other walls to use, put it ANYWHERE ELSE. NOT
above the fireplace.

After you find another place for the tv, look up "wiremold" on the
internet or go to an electrical supply house to buy some. It comes in
plastic or metal, use what suits your fancy.
 
G

George

Speaking of which, I've now got this in boxes sitting in the living
room.
http://www.overstock.com/Home-Garden/Dublin-Oak-Bookcase-Electric-Fireplace-with-Remote/3506931/product.html?cid=95138

I finally caved to the wife.
I'm getting rid of the huge entertainment center that was on that
wall.
We'll see how that monster gets picked up from the curb.
That was her idea too. I never liked it.
And I don't like fireplaces, just peace.
Don't even like real fireplaces unless it's in a northern Canadian
lodge and I've been fishing in the cold all day and I can warm up with
a drink in my hand.
But that's somebody else's fireplace anyway.
This one isn't even real, so I like it less.
Only reason I caved is because I can get rid of the entertainment
center.
But if we want a big TV in the living room, it has to hang on the wall
over that "fireplace."
No other place that works in our small house.
I think that's why they get hung over a fireplace,
Just not enough room for everything.

--Vic

--Vic
As Ed suggested why not a stand? Flat panels are pretty thin. Its not
like trying to accommodate a huge CRT TV.

One of the main reasons for keeping it below horizontal line of site is
that human eyes don't wet properly when looking at a higher angle.
 
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J

John Grabowski

I'm OK with how to wall mount a flat screen TV - this one will be mounted
on
a wall over the gas fireplace - it's a small fireplace with an insert for
the firebox and a metal flue - not a traditional all brick fireplace -
what I'm wondering about is how to hide the power and cable lines behind
the wall - the current cable line comes in through the outside wall about
5 - 6 feet over from where I wanna mount the new TV - that's where the
current wall socket power outlet is, too. I can't see getting over
horizontally from the current locations to the new TV - I'd have to cross
through the vertical studs behind the sheetrock.

Any ideas, besides calling a professional?


*I've done several of these installations. Where there is no basement or
attic access I cut a 5" wide groove in the drywall using my 45 degree angle
cut technique. The groove extends from above or below the existing
electrical receptacle and cable locations over to the side of the fireplace.
I then drill holes in each wall stud to pull the wires through. From the
side of the fireplace cut-out I usually snake the wires up the wall and if
necessary cut a groove to get to the desired location behind the TV.
 
B

bob haller

This one isn't even real, so I like it less.
Only reason I caved is because I can get rid of the entertainment
center.
put new tv where entertainment center was.

to dispose of entrtainment center break it up they arent very strong.

remove the back and a few screws, push the entre thing over and break
it up.

besides it was most likely assembled on site, so you cant get it
assembled thru doors..
 
B

Bob F

Vic said:
I finally caved to the wife.
I'm getting rid of the huge entertainment center that was on that
wall.
We'll see how that monster gets picked up from the curb.
That was her idea too. I never liked it.
And I don't like fireplaces, just peace.
Don't even like real fireplaces unless it's in a northern Canadian
lodge and I've been fishing in the cold all day and I can warm up with
a drink in my hand.
But that's somebody else's fireplace anyway.
This one isn't even real, so I like it less.
Only reason I caved is because I can get rid of the entertainment
center.
But if we want a big TV in the living room, it has to hang on the wall
over that "fireplace."
No other place that works in our small house.
I think that's why they get hung over a fireplace,
Just not enough room for everything.
Put it in front of the fireplace, and get a DVD of a burning fireplace. Or, burn
a fire and make your own video to match what you have.
 
B

Bob F

Vic said:
I tried that with a VHS of fish when my wife wanted aquariums.
Didn't work.
I've got an empty 55 gallon tank, an empty 12, and an empty 6 sitting
in the basement. Plus all the other gear.
The fish kick lasted about 5 years.
As long as she cleaned the tank......
 
R

Ron

Heat is the biggest destroyer of modern electronics.  Thats why they
put large heat sinks and fans in things like tv sets, computers, etc.
Even a small fireplace will pump the heat into that tv, and will
greatly shorten the life of the tv, as well as possibly warping
plastic on the case or even the screen.  What you want to do is just
plain stupid.  You have other walls to use, put it ANYWHERE ELSE.  NOT
above the fireplace.
Not that *I* would put a TV over my fireplace, but many people do it.
Do you think this company makes their customers sign waivers before
installation?

http://hdinstallers.com/fireplacetvinstallation.html

The candles on my fireplace mantel have never melted, so it doesn't
get that hot above *my* fireplace.

And just for the hell of it, I placed a digital thermometer just above
my plasma TV and it is putting out 95 degrees. If I tape the
thermometer to one of the main heat vents it climbs to 105 degrees.
 
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J

jw

Not that *I* would put a TV over my fireplace, but many people do it.
Do you think this company makes their customers sign waivers before
installation?

http://hdinstallers.com/fireplacetvinstallation.html

The candles on my fireplace mantel have never melted, so it doesn't
get that hot above *my* fireplace.

And just for the hell of it, I placed a digital thermometer just above
my plasma TV and it is putting out 95 degrees. If I tape the
thermometer to one of the main heat vents it climbs to 105 degrees.

It all depends on the fireplace design and all of that, but it still
seems rather risky. Modern electronics would likely last forever if
it was not for heat causing failure. I'd rate heat as the #1 cause.
The other things are lightning and power surges.
 
H

Hustlin' Hank

I'm OK with how to wall mount a flat screen TV - this one will be mountedon
a wall over the gas fireplace - it's a small fireplace with an insert for
the firebox and a metal flue - not a traditional all brick fireplace - what
I'm wondering about is how to hide the power and cable lines behind the
wall - the current cable line comes in through the outside wall about 5 -6
feet over from where I wanna mount the new TV  - that's where the current
wall socket power outlet is, too.  I can't see getting over horizontally
from the current locations to the new TV - I'd have to cross through the
vertical studs behind the sheetrock.

Any ideas, besides calling a professional?

Thanks!
If your house/chimney is like mine, the chimney is boxed in with
framing on the exterior of the house with plenty of room around the
chimney. I also have a basement. Drill from the inside drywall into
the cavity that surrounds your metal chimney. Be VERY careful not to
drill into the chimney. Access the cavity by removing siding and
cutting thru OSB a large enough panel to get to the wires that will
protude thru the wall. Make this access panel away from the street
side if possible. Install outlet with squeeze box. Run wires down
cavity into basement and then to the place that will house all other
equipment and electric. Replace panel/siding on chimney cavity. Hook
it all up and you're good to go.

Hank
 
K

krw

Note that you need plenum-rated wiring if you do that. Even the fancy
double-layer metal chimney stuff fails at times, or segments become
unhooked if you live in earthquake country.

Personally, I still think it is a lousy place to put a TV, both
ergonomically and TV-lifespan wise.
Agreed! My wife wanted to put the TV above our gas fireplace. We'd have to
have hospital beds in the living room to see it, and the heat is a huge deal.
It's a plasma set, which generates enough heat on its own. I needs no help.

The top of a display should be just above eye level (about 30% above) and well
away from heat sources.
 
T

trader4

Agreed!  My wife wanted to put the TV above our gas fireplace.  We'd have to
have hospital beds in the living room to see it, and the heat is a huge deal.
It's a plasma set, which generates enough heat on its own.  I needs no help.

The top of a display should be just above eye level (about 30% above) andwell
away from heat sources.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
I think the idea of having a TV over the fireplace seems like
a good one until you look into it more. It does look good
up there when you walk into the room. And it gets it totally
out of the way. But, as others have pointed out, the downside
is that I think it sucks for viewing angle. When you're seated
or laying down on a sofa the preferred position has the TV
located on a short stand on the floor.

If he decides to go the fireplace route, here's what I would
do. I'd go get thermometer. Harbor freight has a nice
one that has a probe on the end of about 7 ft of wire so
you can put the probe anywhere. I recently used it where
the issue was how close to the wall you can mount a
TV with there still being sufficient air flow. I'd do some
experimenting to see what the temp is above the fireplace.
It might be perfectly fine.

As for routing the wires, it sounds like the easiest solution
is to just bite the bullet and make some holes in the
drywall as needed to do the routing.
 
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Please tell the wife that placing the tv over the fireplace will void your house insurance or double your premiums because of the fire hazard. The chances of having a fire or of the tv dying from overheating in 2 years is very high. If your wife still insists on her plan, get a divorce. It's easier and cheaper than rebuying a house and furnishings or perhaps losing your life trying to satisfy the spoiled child you married.
 
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