How To Prevent Rot At Bottom Of Wood Post/Column


R

R Alexander

The big box stores sell a plastic stand-off that come in 4" x 4" and 6" x
6". They keep the bottom of the post 1" off a concrete surface to help
prevent rot.

I can't use these commercial standoffs because I'm using larger wooden
poles--not pressure treated-- with bottom diameters varying from 7 to 9
inches.

Also because of the size of the pole base, I'm using some hefty angle iron
and 5/8" retrofit bolts to anchor the post. I considered but decided not
to use the Simpson 6x6 post base because I'm not satisfied with it's
resistance to tension loads.

Question: Could I fabricate a standoff by scavenging some flat plastic
material--off a 5 gallon bucket or wherever-- and stack it approximately a
quarter of an inch high beneath the post bottom to keep it off the concrete?
I'm assuming this plastic material is not going to compress much under the
axial load.

Any suggestions?

FYI, there are 5 posts in total, 6' on center, supporting a balcony. There
is a roof over the balcony and columns but I plan to varnish or
polyeurothane the columns.

Thanks.

Bob
 
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G

Guest

R said:
The big box stores sell a plastic stand-off that come in 4" x 4" and 6" x
6". They keep the bottom of the post 1" off a concrete surface to help
prevent rot.

I can't use these commercial standoffs because I'm using larger wooden
poles--not pressure treated-- with bottom diameters varying from 7 to 9
inches.

Also because of the size of the pole base, I'm using some hefty angle iron
and 5/8" retrofit bolts to anchor the post. I considered but decided not
to use the Simpson 6x6 post base because I'm not satisfied with it's
resistance to tension loads.

Question: Could I fabricate a standoff by scavenging some flat plastic
material--off a 5 gallon bucket or wherever-- and stack it approximately a
quarter of an inch high beneath the post bottom to keep it off the concrete?
I'm assuming this plastic material is not going to compress much under the
axial load.

Any suggestions?

FYI, there are 5 posts in total, 6' on center, supporting a balcony. There
is a roof over the balcony and columns but I plan to varnish or
polyeurothane the columns.

Thanks.

Bob
Help me out here .. .. .. you're not "satisfied" that a commercially
made, tested apparatus is sufficient, yet you want to shit-rig your
precious columns on top of scrap bucket components ?? ?? ??

If these columns are supporting ANY weight, the plastic will compress ..
... .. how much is anybody's guess.

They used to (probably still do) make those standoffs out of cast
aluminum .. .. .. I'd look around for some of those before using plastic
bucket scraps. Fiberglass grating "might" work, but if you don't have
ready access to small pieces the cost is out of sight.
 
P

Phil Scott

R Alexander said:
The big box stores sell a plastic stand-off that come in 4"
x 4" and 6" x
6". They keep the bottom of the post 1" off a concrete
surface to help
prevent rot.

I can't use these commercial standoffs because I'm using
larger wooden
poles--not pressure treated-- with bottom diameters varying
from 7 to 9
inches.

Also because of the size of the pole base, I'm using some
hefty angle iron
and 5/8" retrofit bolts to anchor the post. I considered
but decided not
to use the Simpson 6x6 post base because I'm not satisfied
with it's
resistance to tension loads.
Tension?


Question: Could I fabricate a standoff by scavenging some
flat plastic
material--off a 5 gallon bucket or wherever-- and stack it
approximately a
quarter of an inch high beneath the post bottom to keep it
off the concrete?
I'm assuming this plastic material is not going to compress
much under the
axial load.

Any suggestions?
copper sulfate wood preservative soak. Borax powdered hand
soap in the hole (kills termites all around the area).
and crushed gravel at the base of the pole (so water drains
from the area. wrap the sides of the pole in a water repellent
wrap made for the purpose (and used by utility companies on
wood poles). If you do none of that they might last 20 years
or longer. the more of those precautions you take the more
you extend the life. the ground around the poles should be
sloped to drain water away. I would treat the pole to a level
approx 12" above ground with the copper sulfate... available
at any hardware or lumber store.

I would not varnish the poles, that will form a thick coating
that water gets under,. its ugly...I would use tung oil on the
poles, then brush a new coat on every year or two..it soaks
in, the new coat disolved the old coat... better might be
'sun frog' its a heavy oil..in various colors. lasts very
well for long periods of time with no recoating...it never
dries, it just soaks in over time, keeps yer wood dry...the
colored version with pigment keep the sun from taking out the
lignin



Phil Scott
 
B

Bob Morrison

In a previous post R Alexander wrote...
Question: Could I fabricate a standoff by scavenging some flat plastic
material--off a 5 gallon bucket or wherever-- and stack it approximately a
quarter of an inch high beneath the post bottom to keep it off the concrete?
I'm assuming this plastic material is not going to compress much under the
axial load.
Do not use plastic bucket material. It is a low grade PVC and will
compress. If you want to use plastic, then use HDPE or UHMW PE.

--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
Structural & Civil Engineering
Poulsbo WA
bob at rlmorrisonengr dot com
 
A

Al Bundy

Help me out here .. .. .. you're not "satisfied" that a commercially
made, tested apparatus is sufficient, yet you want to shit-rig your
precious columns on top of scrap bucket components ?? ?? ??

If these columns are supporting ANY weight, the plastic will compress
.. .. .. how much is anybody's guess.

They used to (probably still do) make those standoffs out of cast
aluminum .. .. .. I'd look around for some of those before using
plastic bucket scraps. Fiberglass grating "might" work, but if you
don't have ready access to small pieces the cost is out of sight.


yet you want to shit-rig your
precious columns on top of scrap bucket components ?? ?? ??
LMAO. Well said!
 
B

Bobk207

Phil said:
copper sulfate wood preservative soak. Borax powdered hand
soap in the hole (kills termites all around the area).
and crushed gravel at the base of the pole (so water drains
from the area. wrap the sides of the pole in a water repellent
wrap made for the purpose (and used by utility companies on
wood poles). If you do none of that they might last 20 years
or longer. the more of those precautions you take the more
you extend the life. the ground around the poles should be
sloped to drain water away. I would treat the pole to a level
approx 12" above ground with the copper sulfate... available
at any hardware or lumber store.

I would not varnish the poles, that will form a thick coating
that water gets under,. its ugly...I would use tung oil on the
poles, then brush a new coat on every year or two..it soaks
in, the new coat disolved the old coat... better might be
'sun frog' its a heavy oil..in various colors. lasts very
well for long periods of time with no recoating...it never
dries, it just soaks in over time, keeps yer wood dry...the
colored version with pigment keep the sun from taking out the
lignin



Phil Scott
check these out

http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/LCB-CB.html

you should be able to get bases large enough to fit your poles with a
minimum of cutting

plastic? not a great idea.


cheers
Bob
 
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T

Tony Miklos

R said:
The big box stores sell a plastic stand-off that come in 4" x 4" and 6" x
6". They keep the bottom of the post 1" off a concrete surface to help
prevent rot.

I can't use these commercial standoffs because I'm using larger wooden
poles--not pressure treated-- with bottom diameters varying from 7 to 9
inches.
Why not get the metal ones and form a square with 4 of them under each
pole? (Or more if they fit.)

As far as plastic buckets or steel, it can't be smooth and flat on top!
No matter what, it will get wet, so the whole idea is to let water out
and air in.

Tony
 

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