how to prevent fence posts rotting


S

ss

I know there are all sorts of preservatives in B&Q etc for painting on
fence posts but isnt there a longer term solution like coating the part
below ground with something to stop water soaking in to the posts, like
a plastic coating. I am basing my enquiry on the basis of thinking most
of the bog standard preservatives are so enviromentally friendly they
probably are not really much good.

Any thoughts or ideas on this.
 
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J

Jim K

I know there are all sorts of preservatives in B&Q etc for painting on
fence posts but isnt there a longer term solution like coating the part
below ground with something to stop water soaking in to the posts, like
a plastic coating. I am basing my enquiry on the basis of thinking most
of the bog standard preservatives are so enviromentally friendly they
probably are not really much good.

Any thoughts or ideas on this.
bitumen?

Jim K
 
A

Alan

ss said:
I know there are all sorts of preservatives in B&Q etc for painting on
fence posts but isnt there a longer term solution like coating the part
below ground with something to stop water soaking in to the posts, like
a plastic coating. I am basing my enquiry on the basis of thinking most
of the bog standard preservatives are so enviromentally friendly they
probably are not really much good.

Any thoughts or ideas on this.
Leave the post standing in a bucket of old engine oil/paraffin for a
week. Daily coat the post to "ground level" using an old paint brush

When concreting into the ground take the concrete an inch above ground
level and taper it for water run off.
 
R

Rod Speed

ss said:
I know there are all sorts of preservatives in B&Q etc for painting on
fence posts but isnt there a longer term solution like coating the
part below ground with something to stop water soaking in to the
posts, like a plastic coating. I am basing my enquiry on the basis of
thinking most of the bog standard preservatives are so enviromentally
friendly they probably are not really much good.
Any thoughts or ideas on this.
Use galvanised steel posts instead.
 
A

Andrew Gabriel

I know there are all sorts of preservatives in B&Q etc for painting on
fence posts but isnt there a longer term solution like coating the part
below ground with something to stop water soaking in to the posts, like
a plastic coating. I am basing my enquiry on the basis of thinking most
of the bog standard preservatives are so enviromentally friendly they
probably are not really much good.

Any thoughts or ideas on this.
Yes, you don't want wooden posts going into the ground in the first
place, at least, not if you're attaching a large wind sail (a.k.a.
a fence panel) to them.

25 years ago, I used fence post sockets, which hold the post above
the ground. You could get spiked ones you hammer in, or ones to be
concreted in. These have worked extremely well, and the untreated
unpainted timber posts are still rock solid.

Unfortunately, all the fence post sockets I've seen recently are
completely crap in comparison with the ones I bought 25 years ago
(Fensock was the make), so I don't know that this is quite as
viable now. I tried Metapost, and they just don't grip the posts
properly. The Fensock ones have a pair of clamp bolts, and haven't
rusted. The Metapost ones are already rusty in the builder's
merchant's yard.

In addition to the other options mentioned, you might consider the
concrete post spurs, which you concrete into the ground with a
couple of feet above, and bolt the post to them using coach bolts
through the holes. Again, this would probably work by holding the
posts above the ground.
 
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H

harry

I know there are all sorts of preservatives in B&Q etc for painting on
fence posts but isnt there a longer term solution like coating the part
below ground with something to stop water soaking in to the posts, like
a plastic coating. I am basing my enquiry on the basis of thinking most
of the bog standard preservatives are so enviromentally friendly they
probably are not really much good.

Any thoughts or ideas on this.

The metal ground spikes are the total solution. Can be a problem to
drive in some ground.
 
B

Brian Gaff

all I can say is that all the wood posts I have which were in concrete
rotted but the ones a bit longer but put into earth seem not to have done.
Brian
 
B

Brian Gaff

The problem with coating a post at the bottom is much the same as the
concrete. Wood does breathe and change size but concrete and plastic coating
does not so water gets in between the coating and the wood and accelerates
rotting in my experience. The old creosote was pretty good but these days
you seem not to be able to get it.
Brian
 
D

Dave Liquorice

The old creosote was pretty good but these days you seem not to be able
to get it.
I think you can but not retail. An agricultural suppliers would be
the place to look.

Wooden post rot at/just above ground level, in the "goldie locks"
zone for timber rotting fungus/bacteria. In the ground is generally
too wet, 6" above the ground generally too dry, oxygen levels also
affect things.

Decent pressure treated timber should last reasonably well or *dry*
timber where the entire bottom end to 6" above the ground level has
been stood in a container of quality wood preservative for the best
part of a week. And the rest of the post liberally brushed with
presetvative, several times.
 
S

stuart noble

Something tells me these will be a waste of money, but by then you won't
remember that you used them. I've known people char the bottom of posts
but IME nothing makes much difference. As Dave says the problem lies AT
ground level, not below ground.
 
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T

The Other Mike

D) .. do I what I did fit concrete H section posts, and fit wood between
them, paint with Santdtex in colour to match wood - I mixed my own ..
unless you go real close you do not know they are not wood.
They will not rot, and also will not blow or over or work loose
Or clad them in tanalised rough sawn timber - gravel boards are ideal
if a bit wide. Then they look like solid timber.

--
 
C

Chris Holford

ss said:
I know there are all sorts of preservatives in B&Q etc for painting on
fence posts but isnt there a longer term solution like coating the part
below ground with something to stop water soaking in to the posts, like
a plastic coating. I am basing my enquiry on the basis of thinking most
of the bog standard preservatives are so enviromentally friendly they
probably are not really much good.

Any thoughts or ideas on this.
At my last house I drilled a 1/4" dia. hole into the posts about 4"
above ground level and angled about 45degrees downwards. Each year I
squirted 'Cuprinol' into each hole to fill it. Each hole was plugged
with a short piece of dowel left protruding by about 1/4". Posts are
still there after 30 years. Don't know if that sort of 'Cuprinol ' is
still available.
 
I

Ian Jackson

Chris Holford said:
At my last house I drilled a 1/4" dia. hole into the posts about 4"
above ground level and angled about 45degrees downwards. Each year I
squirted 'Cuprinol' into each hole to fill it. Each hole was plugged
with a short piece of dowel left protruding by about 1/4". Posts are
still there after 30 years. Don't know if that sort of 'Cuprinol ' is
still available.
When I read this, I thought that, somewhere in 'the works', my post had
been edited. Then I realised that I had only saved mine as a draft copy.
It's almost word-for-word. This is what I said:

"To maintain the effectiveness of the preservation, at about 6" above
the ground, drill a (say) 1/2" hole to the centre of the post, and at a
downwards angle of 45 degrees. Fill the hole with preservative (as
above, or creosote/creocote), and put a watertight bung in it. Every so
often, top up the hole."
 
C

Chris Holford

(e-mail address removed)> writes
snip
When I read this, I thought that, somewhere in 'the works', my post had
been edited. Then I realised that I had only saved mine as a draft copy.
It's almost word-for-word.
Great minds....!
ISTR posting something similar a few months ago, -or did I only think
about doing so... -getting forgetful in my old age. Anyway the method
does seem to work well if you remember to do it each year.
 
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D

D.M.Chapman

I know there are all sorts of preservatives in B&Q etc for painting on
fence posts but isnt there a longer term solution like coating the part
below ground with something to stop water soaking in to the posts, like
a plastic coating. I am basing my enquiry on the basis of thinking most
of the bog standard preservatives are so enviromentally friendly they
probably are not really much good.

Any thoughts or ideas on this.


If you want to use wooden posts, then get decent pressure treated ones
to start with, and avoid cutting them.

I've used http://www.jacksons-fencing.co.uk/treatment-process.aspx before
as they are local but I recoomend them. I know of a couple of their fences
that are over 25 years old, have never been retreated and are still fine.

I assume similar companies are all over the place - no connection with
Jacksons other than being a happy customer! :)

Darren
 
D

Dave Liquorice

I assume similar companies are all over the place - no connection with
Jacksons other than being a happy customer! :)
For a price, when I was looking for timber gates Jacksons prices were
eye watering. Got all three gates made by a local firm terated and
delivered for less than the price of one gate from Jacksons...

This was a good few years ago and all the gates are still sound.
 
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D

Dave Liquorice

Something tells me these will be a waste of money, but by then you won't
remember that you used them. I've known people char the bottom of posts
but IME nothing makes much difference. As Dave says the problem lies AT
ground level, not below ground.
Can't say I'm convinced either. The sleeve is fitted so the top is
well above ground level so the enviroment in the timber might remain
too wet by capillary action from the ground and lacking in oxygen.
Above the sleeve it can dry out fairly quickly so the Goldilocks Zone
might be reduced.
 

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