Gas cooker connector


G

Guest

I've had to disconnect my gas tumble drier in order to investigate a
'squeek--bang bang' from the drum. (combination of failed rear bearing and a
penny in the works).

The quick release gas connector (as in cooker flexible hoses) is very stiff.
Is there a recommended lubricant for these connectors?
 
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E

Ed Sirett

I've had to disconnect my gas tumble drier in order to investigate a
'squeek--bang bang' from the drum. (combination of failed rear bearing and a
penny in the works).

The quick release gas connector (as in cooker flexible hoses) is very stiff.
Is there a recommended lubricant for these connectors?
If I came across this problem I'd probably replace the bayonet outlet.
If I was pressed to make a 'repair' I'd very sparingly smear silicone
GREASE (cf. sealant) on the O-ring and/or the smooth surface it mates with.
 
J

John Stumbles

If I came across this problem I'd probably replace the bayonet outlet.
If I was pressed to make a 'repair' I'd very sparingly smear silicone
GREASE (cf. sealant) on the O-ring and/or the smooth surface it mates
with.
If I were a DIY newbie and didn't know what 'cf' means[1] I might think
it meant you _could_ use sealant, whereas Ed is saying use Silicone
grease, NOT sealant.

FWIW I'd be inclined to smear a bit of soap on it. However I have come
across some bayonet sockets that do not seem inclined to accept the hose
connector under any circumstances. (Supply your own pornographic metaphor ;-))


[1] what does it mean, BTW? :)
I mean, I know it means 'compare with' but what does it stand for? Is it a
Latin abbreviation?
 
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M

Man at B&Q

If I came across this problem I'd probably replace the bayonet outlet.
If I was pressed to make a 'repair' I'd very sparingly smear silicone
GREASE (cf. sealant) on the O-ring and/or the smooth surface it mates
with.
If I were a DIY newbie and didn't know what 'cf' means[1] I might think
it meant you _could_ use sealant, whereas Ed is saying use Silicone
grease, NOT sealant.
Indeed. From the latin confer, it's usually used to indicate something
in agreement or in support of, rather than the contrary. A
particularly bad example.

MBQ
 

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