Garage door issue - need advice please


M

Mike

So last night I hit the button on the remote control to close my 30
year old garage door. Just as the door was about closed, I heard a
loud pop. Turns out that the one of the wires that attaches the one
of the long springs to the door has broken, leaving me with only one
of the big springs still working. The opener will still open and
close the door, but I can tell it's working a harder than it used to.
How urgent is the need to replace the thick wire that attaches the
spring to the door? Is this something that a garage-door rookie can
do? I know garage door replacement is something best left to the
pros, but I'm hoping I can handle this repair on my own.

Thanks for any info...

Mike
 
M

Mike

So last night I hit the button on the remote control to close my 30
year old garage door.  Just as the door was about closed, I heard a
loud pop.  Turns out that the one of the wires that attaches the one
of the long springs to the door has broken, leaving me with only one
of the big springs still working.  The opener will still open and
close the door, but I can tell it's working a harder than it used to.
How urgent is the need to replace the thick wire that attaches the
spring to the door?  Is this something that a garage-door rookie can
do?  I know garage door replacement is something best left to the
pros, but I'm hoping I can handle this repair on my own.

Thanks for any info...

Mike
Just now doing some googling....which perhaps I should have done prior
to posting here....these are extension springs. I believe the springs
are okay, but the sheave (pulley) on one side is the issue. Actually,
the pulley might be okay, but the wire that runs through the pulley is
what snapped. Has anyone replaced that wire?

Mike
 
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D

Doug Miller

Extra strain on the motor will shorten its life - sometimes dramatically.

Yes, you can do it yourself.

Go to the box store and, if they don't have a repair kit, get twice as much
of the same guage wire rope as was destroyed, plus ample connectors.

Raise the door and prop it open with a board.

Restring the whole thing, following the path of the original or using the
unbroken one as a guide. Inspect the working spring/cable assemply for any
kinks, fraying, etc. If found, replace that cable connections also.

While you're working on it, string some cable THRU the spring and secure
both ends. This is a safety feature to protect your family, pets, neighbors,
and strangers walking down the street from the shrapnel if the spring
breaks.

There is a very small safety issue if the tension on the springs has been
released by the door being raised.
What he said. Been there, done that, just that way. Not difficult, and not
particularly dangerous, either -- much less so than torsion springs.
 
E

Eric in North TX

Extra strain on the motor will shorten its life - sometimes dramatically.

Yes, you can do it yourself.

Go to the box store and, if they don't have a repair kit, get twice as much
of the same guage wire rope as was destroyed, plus ample connectors.

Raise the door and prop it open with a board.

Restring the whole thing, following the path of the original or using the
unbroken one as a guide. Inspect the working spring/cable assemply for any
kinks, fraying, etc. If found, replace that cable connections also.

While you're working on it, string some cable THRU the spring and secure
both ends. This is a safety feature to protect your family, pets, neighbors,
and strangers walking down the street from the shrapnel if the spring
breaks.

There is a very small safety issue if the tension on the springs has been
released by the door being raised.
Though our garage was empty, so no injuries, when one of the springs
broke, it still did a lot of damage, it broke a healthy 2" X 4" in
half for one thing.
By all means secure those.
 
J

Jason Bourne

So last night I hit the button on the remote control to close my 30
year old garage door. Just as the door was about closed, I heard a
loud pop. Turns out that the one of the wires that attaches the one
of the long springs to the door has broken, leaving me with only one
of the big springs still working. The opener will still open and
close the door, but I can tell it's working a harder than it used to.
How urgent is the need to replace the thick wire that attaches the
spring to the door? Is this something that a garage-door rookie can
do? I know garage door replacement is something best left to the
pros, but I'm hoping I can handle this repair on my own.

Thanks for any info...

Mike
Jeebus man, if you know so little about garage doors that you'd even
consider operating the door with only one spring, you'd better hire a
pro right quick!
 
D

DerbyDad03

Though our garage was empty, so no injuries, when one of the springs
broke, it still did a lot of damage, it broke a healthy 2" X 4"  in
half  for one thing.
By all means secure those.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
A co-worker's garage *wasn't* empty when one of his springs broke.

The garage contained - wait for it... *him*!

The spring caught him in the side of the face, knocked him unconscious
and broke his nose and cheekbone.

He was out of work for 2 months while he recuperated.
 
G

Guest

That's scary. I just checked mine and they have a torsion (vs stretch)
springs that have a steel rod running through it. Whew! If I were
installing a new door, I would certainly look for that kind.

Now I am concerned about the stretch springs on my attic stairway - Should
I put a steel cable through those? Will the cable get caught in the spring
when the door closes (tension on the spring is released?)
 
H

hr(bob) hofmann

That's scary.  I just checked mine and they have a torsion (vs stretch)
springs that have a steel rod running through it.  Whew!  If I were
installing a new door, I would certainly look for that kind.

Now I am concerned about the stretch springs on my attic stairway - Should
I put a steel cable through those?  Will the cable get caught in the spring
when the door closes (tension on the spring is released?)







- Show quoted text -
Torsion bars can be just as big a problem when they break, and MUCH
mor difficult to fix.
 
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L

LSMFT

That's scary. I just checked mine and they have a torsion (vs stretch)
springs that have a steel rod running through it. Whew! If I were
installing a new door, I would certainly look for that kind.

Now I am concerned about the stretch springs on my attic stairway - Should
I put a steel cable through those? Will the cable get caught in the spring
when the door closes (tension on the spring is released?)
It's not scary if you have a safety cable going through the spring.
 
F

FatterDumber& Happier Moe

LSMFT said:
It's not scary if you have a safety cable going through the spring.
If I remember correctly, with a automatic opener the springs should be
adjusted to the door stay put about 1/2 way open with the opener
detached.
I was in a garage once working on an old garage door when one of the
stretch springs broke, it slapped the back of the garage pretty hard.
Watch for rust on the springs, that's what does the damage to allow
them to break.
 
C

clare

If I remember correctly, with a automatic opener the springs should be
adjusted to the door stay put about 1/2 way open with the opener
detached.
I was in a garage once working on an old garage door when one of the
stretch springs broke, it slapped the back of the garage pretty hard.
Watch for rust on the springs, that's what does the damage to allow
them to break.
I wouldnt have a garage door with cabled tension springs for all the
tea in china. I'll take the hassles of replacing and adjusting torsion
springs and day over a tension spring setup. I've seen too many cars
with severe body damage from a tension spring letting go to take a
chance with my life.

The garage door on my current garage has tension springs - but they
are vertical, directly connected to the lift arms of a one peice
swing-up stanley steel garage door and are comparatively harmless.
I've replaced lots of torsion springs on ro;;-ups in both domestic
garages and on the service bays at various servive garages I've worked
over the decades - they don't scare me any more.
 
H

hr(bob) hofmann

 I wouldnt have a garage door with cabled tension springs for all the
tea in china. I'll take the hassles of replacing and adjusting torsion
springs and day over a tension spring setup. I've seen too many cars
with severe body damage from a tension spring letting go to take a
chance with my life.

The garage door on my current garage has tension springs - but they
are vertical, directly connected to the lift arms of a one peice
swing-up stanley steel garage door and are comparatively harmless.
I've replaced lots of torsion springs on ro;;-ups in both domestic
garages and on the service bays at various servive garages I've worked
over the decades - they don't scare me any more.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
If a steel cable/rope is run thru the tension side springs, and
SECURED to something that is very strong, then if one of the side
spings does break loose, the cabkle running thru it wil limit the
distance it can fly. The OP needs to look at an up-to-date side
spring installation, take a few photos, and then go replace his spring
and cable assembly. Springs are color-coded if I remember correctly,
if he can find a color code on the broken spring he is in good shape.
 
K

krw

If a steel cable/rope is run thru the tension side springs, and
SECURED to something that is very strong, then if one of the side
spings does break loose, the cabkle running thru it wil limit the
distance it can fly. The OP needs to look at an up-to-date side
spring installation, take a few photos, and then go replace his spring
and cable assembly. Springs are color-coded if I remember correctly,
if he can find a color code on the broken spring he is in good shape.
Replace them in pairs! If one went, the chances are very good that the other
one isn't far behind. Even if it doesn't fail, the old one will be a lot
weaker than the new.
 
H

hr(bob) hofmann

Replace them in pairs!  If one went, the chances are very good that theother
one isn't far behind.  Even if it doesn't fail, the old one will be a lot
weaker than the new.  - Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Very good point. Also, take one of the old springs with you to try to
find a replacement of the same size spring wire and spring length.
 
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H

hallerb

Very good point.  Also, take one of the old springs with you to try to
find a replacement of the same size spring wire and spring length.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
after a garage door at my then rental home got damaged I found calling
a garage door speciality company was a real bargain..... the track
costr a fortune.

they came in and fixed it cheap added safety cables and a new pener
for less than the parts would of cost me.

my opinion. they mark up the parts a LOT to discourage DIYers./

anyhow it worked for me....
 

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