Frickin annoying creaky floors


S

Suz

We don't have any. But my mother does. When we do the loft conversion,
would heavier than average joists help with a creak-free finish? If so what
should we specify when getting quotes? Any other tips or info gratefully
received as usual.

Suzanne
 
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P

Peter Ashby

Suz said:
We don't have any. But my mother does. When we do the loft conversion,
would heavier than average joists help with a creak-free finish? If so what
should we specify when getting quotes? Any other tips or info gratefully
received as usual.
Specify they screw the flooring down instead of nailing it. That is also
likely to be the solution to your Mum's problem, ie screw the offending
floorboards down.

Peter
 
J

John Lang Wilson

The message <[email protected]>
from "Suz said:
We don't have any. But my mother does. When we do the loft conversion,
would heavier than average joists help with a creak-free finish? If so what
should we specify when getting quotes? Any other tips or info gratefully
received as usual.
I have recently spent ages trying to cure two annoying creaks. After
lifting the carpet and screwing down the floorboards there was still no
change.

I eventually traced it to 1) Radiator pipe rubbing against its entry
hole and 2) Gas pipe flexed over deeper joist.

As someone stepped on the floor the small amount of flexion made wood
rub against copper resulting in a creak. Easily fixed by judicious
placing of insulating felt where pipe and wood in contact.
 
S

Suz

Peter Ashby said:
Specify they screw the flooring down instead of nailing it. That is also
likely to be the solution to your Mum's problem, ie screw the offending
floorboards down.
Mum's has been screwed down and it helped a bit, but still is terrible. I
have never heard a squeakier floor in my life and lived in some student
dives in my time. One of the worst places is the bathroom and I think its
the hotpress area that is the worst. Maybe its rubbing on the floor? It's
against Mum's bedroom wall too and drives her nuts if anyone is in there
after she gone to bed.
I fear this might happen in the roof conversion which will be a bedroom for
my 2 girls aged 3 and 4 (a right pair of elephants - who ever said girls are
dainty and lightfooted??!?) and is *right* above my bed.
 
B

BillR

Suz said:
Mum's has been screwed down and it helped a bit, but still is
terrible. I have never heard a squeakier floor in my life and lived
in some student dives in my time. One of the worst places is the
bathroom and I think its the hotpress area that is the worst. Maybe
its rubbing on the floor? It's against Mum's bedroom wall too and
drives her nuts if anyone is in there after she gone to bed.
I fear this might happen in the roof conversion which will be a
bedroom for my 2 girls aged 3 and 4 (a right pair of elephants - who
ever said girls are dainty and lightfooted??!?) and is *right* above
my bed.
Reminds me the time as a 1st time buyer in a new build street where several
of my neighbours were also colleagues.
Most people boarded their loft and nailed the boards.
One bright spark who had a phd decided it was better to screw the boards.
What he didn't realise was that the top side of ceiling joists is often not
level.
After much screwing he went down to find all the ceiling plasterboards in
the bedrooms had been pulled up at odd levels and basically ruined :)
Was a source of amusement at work for some time on the theme of theory vs
practical knowledge.
 
P

Peter Ashby

BillR said:
Reminds me the time as a 1st time buyer in a new build street where several
of my neighbours were also colleagues.
Most people boarded their loft and nailed the boards.
One bright spark who had a phd decided it was better to screw the boards.
What he didn't realise was that the top side of ceiling joists is often not
level.
After much screwing he went down to find all the ceiling plasterboards in
the bedrooms had been pulled up at odd levels and basically ruined :)
yes, I can see that happening.
Was a source of amusement at work for some time on the theme of theory vs
practical knowledge.
Indeed. We get such people thinking that knowledge in one academic area
gives them the ability to propound in quite another. So you get
Physicists writing books on consciousness telling the Neuroscientists
they have got it all wrong and Astronomers (two come to mind) that
insist new viral epidemics rain down from the sky. The remaining one of
those two was still insisting that SARS arrived via that route recently
even as it was being found in palm civets.

Beware academics pronouncing outside their specialisations. Me? I'm a
rare breed, I managed not to specialise, much. So I'm sort of exempt ;-)

Peter
 
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B

BigWallop

Peter Ashby said:
yes, I can see that happening.


Indeed. We get such people thinking that knowledge in one academic area
gives them the ability to propound in quite another. So you get
Physicists writing books on consciousness telling the Neuroscientists
they have got it all wrong and Astronomers (two come to mind) that
insist new viral epidemics rain down from the sky. The remaining one of
those two was still insisting that SARS arrived via that route recently
even as it was being found in palm civets.

Beware academics pronouncing outside their specialisations. Me? I'm a
rare breed, I managed not to specialise, much. So I'm sort of exempt ;-)

Peter
Jack of all. Master of none. (anon, but claimed by prof' jerkoff)
 
S

stefek.zaba

In uk.d-i-y said:
Indeed. We get such people thinking that knowledge in one academic area
gives them the ability to propound in quite another. So you get
Physicists
(well, a mathematician with some knowledge of theoretical physics,
ass-U-ming you're aiming a well-deserved kick up Sir Roger's backside ;-)
.......... writing books on consciousness telling the Neuroscientists
they have got it all wrong and Astronomers (two come to mind) that
insist new viral epidemics rain down from the sky. The remaining one of
those two was still insisting that SARS arrived via that route recently
even as it was being found in palm civets.
Not to mention a couple of chemists dabbling in catalysis pronouncing
unlimited energy from fusion power ;-)
Beware academics pronouncing outside their specialisations.
Damn right. In the cold fusion case at least, the risk is increased by
eager PR and IPR hangers-on at the institution, who are prone to talking
out of their elbows at the least provocation...

Stefek
 
P

Peter Ashby

(well, a mathematician with some knowledge of theoretical physics,
ass-U-ming you're aiming a well-deserved kick up Sir Roger's backside ;-)
More a bit of snide sniggering, I'm a pacifist.
Not to mention a couple of chemists dabbling in catalysis pronouncing
unlimited energy from fusion power ;-)
Yes, thanks for that one. Over in uk.philosophy.humanism we have been
discussing Prof. Jonjoe McFadden's Quantum Evolution and CEMI Field
Theory of Consciousness. He kindly posted some papers of his on the
latter on his website. It might look impressive to the uninformed but I
find it more than curious he can spend many pages talking about a
process he claims will synchronise your neurons without ever discussing
the issue of time and timing. He is a molecular biologist btw.
Damn right. In the cold fusion case at least, the risk is increased by
eager PR and IPR hangers-on at the institution, who are prone to talking
out of their elbows at the least provocation...
Ah yes, coordinating the press release to come out on the same day as
the publication of your seminal paper in Nature or Science is the best
route to avoid embarassment (though not foolproof or a sure route to
ecstasy). I understand there are still people working on the
'phenomenon', quietly.

Peter
 
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Back on topic.

We had the same problem with our lounge and dining room. As our house is built on a concrete raft, there's eighteen inches of clearance under the floorboards. I made a wide enough access panel in the floor of the cupboard under the stairs. It's a maze under there with support walls but designed so that you can get anywhere under there.
I cured the problem by taking my tools and some wedges down there and getting my wife to stand on all the offending places so I could work out where to fit wedges.

Digressing a bit, if you're having a new carpet laid, when you've removed the old carpet and underlay. fit some sheets of hardboard over the entire floor and tack it down, you'll end up with smooth floors and fewer squeaks.
 

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