Fireplace renovation


F

Fig

Hello all,

I am toying with the idea of restoring a couple of old fireplaces in
the period property that I own with a view to improving the resale
value of the property and am wondering whether anyone has performed a
cost benefit analysis of such a project. The reason for asking is that
the agents I have has round are not convinced that the work I put in
will translate into profit as obviously the cost of DIY restoration
will be high. Currently the fireplaces are boarded up and plastered
over and I only really want to perform the work if it will be worth my
while?

Any thoughts/opinions about this would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
 
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S

stuart noble

Fig wrote in message said:
I only really want to perform the work if it will be worth my
while?
How much an hour do you want to charge yourself? Essentially a labour of
love I would have thought
 
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Hello all,

I am toying with the idea of restoring a couple of old fireplaces in
the period property that I own with a view to improving the resale
value of the property and am wondering whether anyone has performed a
cost benefit analysis of such a project. The reason for asking is that
the agents I have has round are not convinced that the work I put in
will translate into profit as obviously the cost of DIY restoration
will be high. Currently the fireplaces are boarded up and plastered
over and I only really want to perform the work if it will be worth my
while?

Any thoughts/opinions about this would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
Take notice of the estate agent. they know the business (one of kids is one).
The trap that we can fall into is to do up a place to our own tastes.
What we like is not necessarily what others will too.

When presenting a property make sure it's clean and everything works, i.e. there might be a sticky porch door that you've lived with for ages, so much so that you don't think about it. but it can put off a prospective buyer before they've got through the front door. Don't decorate as the buyers will want to put their own stamp on it.

De-clutter it, remove any excess furnishings etc., you want to make the rooms look as big as possible.
Many purchasers make up their mind as to whether a property is worth considering or not, within fifteen seconds of walking in.
 
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There may be a very good reason the fireplaces are closed off. The flue could be broken which could be a massive cost to disassemble and replace. The fire brick could be disintegrating. There could be cracks that allow smoke into the house. Some fireplaces will draft the warm air out of the house. Some are just designed so poorly that they don’t draft the smoke up the chimney and stink up the house. Listen to your agent.
 
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Hi,

Excellent advice from both Doghouse and Silentrunning. Why were the fireplaces sealed up and what is being hidden?

Fireplaces are dangerous if they allow toxic fumes into the home; would a DIY'er know how to test a fireplace? Fireplace work in my experience is dirty and extremely messy; it's also very time consuming; if the hearth is also changed then the floor covering possibly will require an upgrade too. A knowledge of fireplace materials is needed regarding any mortar or bricks etc; the chimney's might need sweeping or even lining? I don't think the work you suggest would make much profit?

I tend to go over the top when I do a job and our front room fireplace was no exception; in the end it cost over £2,400 just to sort one fireplace out but it was hard graft. I completely removed the old random stone fireplace and slate hearth meaning quite a bit of plastering. Once I'd completed the plastering which was incredibly messy and having let it dry a few days Bron and I then had professionals in to install the new fireplace; surround and hearth; I made the wooden mantle saving a lot of money and installed this. The chimney was tested by the fireplace company and found to be OK.

I then gave the whole room a comprehensive makeover installing frame panelling to the lower walls; new electrics and papered and painted the ceiling. Bron and I think our front room now looks beautiful but it's done entirely to our own taste and we don't intend to be selling our bungalow.

Your two fireplaces might need a lot less work to make them look presentable but here's a few pictures of the work and mess we endured. The fireplace installers did an absolutely brilliant job costing £1,600 the new carpet plus underlay £800. For the wall panels we needed 300' of timber moulding so we bought 300' of PAR softwood and I added the mouldings all 600' of them.

Yes for us it was well worth it and everyone who visits our home is impressed by it but if we decided to sell would it fetch more than our neighbours bungalow who have done nothing at all to theirs in years?

Kind regards, Colin.

Front room._001.JPG
Front room._002.JPG
Front room._003.JPG
Front room._004.JPG
Front room._005.JPG
Front room._006.JPG
 
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Hi,

Excellent advice from both Doghouse and Silentrunning. Why were the fireplaces sealed up and what is being hidden?

Fireplaces are dangerous if they allow toxic fumes into the home; would a DIY'er know how to test a fireplace? Fireplace work in my experience is dirty and extremely messy; it's also very time consuming; if the hearth is also changed then the floor covering possibly will require an upgrade too. A knowledge of fireplace materials is needed regarding any mortar or bricks etc; the chimney's might need sweeping or even lining? I don't think the work you suggest would make much profit?

I tend to go over the top when I do a job and our front room fireplace was no exception; in the end it cost over £2,400 just to sort one fireplace out but it was hard graft. I completely removed the old random stone fireplace and slate hearth meaning quite a bit of plastering. Once I'd completed the plastering which was incredibly messy and having let it dry a few days Bron and I then had professionals in to install the new fireplace; surround and hearth; I made the wooden mantle saving a lot of money and installed this. The chimney was tested by the fireplace company and found to be OK.

I then gave the whole room a comprehensive makeover installing frame panelling to the lower walls; new electrics and papered and painted the ceiling. Bron and I think our front room now looks beautiful but it's done entirely to our own taste and we don't intend to be selling our bungalow.

Your two fireplaces might need a lot less work to make them look presentable but here's a few pictures of the work and mess we endured. The fireplace installers did an absolutely brilliant job costing £1,600 the new carpet plus underlay £800. For the wall panels we needed 300' of timber moulding so we bought 300' of PAR softwood and I added the mouldings all 600' of them.

Yes for us it was well worth it and everyone who visits our home is impressed by it but if we decided to sell would it fetch more than our neighbours bungalow who have done nothing at all to theirs in years?

Kind regards, Colin.

View attachment 1278 View attachment 1279 View attachment 1280 View attachment 1281 View attachment 1282 View attachment 1283
That looked like a lot of work.

there was a Gloworm Majorca back boiler and gas fire in our house when we moved in in 1972.

We had the central heating replaced in 2002 so the old boiler and fire had to go. "We had to beat it to death with a shovel."

We really didn't need a fire in that room, but my wife inisted on having a coal effect gas fire in its place,*in case the central heating ever broke down."

She designed the art deco marble fire surround we had fitted.

There is a fire behind there somewhere, but it's never been on.

P1000971.JPG


The fitting was a bit of a nonsense, the fire supply company said they'd have to put scaffolding up to get on the roof to pull out the old corrugated flue and change the cowl, which would cost a lot more than what they quoted for fitting the fire. I wasn't having any of that. I got up onto the roof via the flat roof of our lounge extension, walked up the tiles to the chimney, removed the old cowl, pulled out the flue tube and cemented in a new cowl.
 
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