Exterior Paintwork


A

Andrew May

I need to repaint a front door and other exterior woodwork. Ideally, the
door at least, should be a high gloss finish.

Have had bad experiences in the past with the VOC2010 type paint. Not
full gloss, takes ages to 'dry' and quite soft when it does.

So what is the current paint of choice for this application?

Andrew
 
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F

fred

Andrew May said:
I need to repaint a front door and other exterior woodwork. Ideally, the
door at least, should be a high gloss finish.

Have had bad experiences in the past with the VOC2010 type paint. Not
full gloss, takes ages to 'dry' and quite soft when it does.

So what is the current paint of choice for this application?
I've had top results with International 10 Year Exterior Gloss on window
frames and would not hesitate to use it on a front door.

High gloss and microporous so should last. Goes on without primer with
best results like that as you get the microporous benefits.

http://www.international-paints.co.uk/products/info/10_year_exterior_gloss.
jsp

Not that readily available, not much of a colour range and not cheap but
worth it in my view. I got mine at B&Q but their (shit, shit, shit) site
refuses to find it, despite a google site based search finding refs to
it there.
 
F

fred

I've had top results with International 10 Year Exterior Gloss on window
frames and would not hesitate to use it on a front door.

High gloss and microporous so should last. Goes on without primer with
best results like that as you get the microporous benefits.
Correction, they say to use International Exterior Primer Undercoat
although I used it successfully without.
 
M

Mark

Andrew said:
I need to repaint a front door and other exterior woodwork. Ideally, the
door at least, should be a high gloss finish.

Have had bad experiences in the past with the VOC2010 type paint. Not
full gloss, takes ages to 'dry' and quite soft when it does.

So what is the current paint of choice for this application?

Andrew
I have been told, and i dont know how true this is, that you can buy a vile
of the missing VOCs to make this now Fucking useless paint work like it is
supposed too.
However for outside use i now prefer sadolin superdec anyway.

-
 
A

Andrew May

I've had top results with International 10 Year Exterior Gloss on window
frames and would not hesitate to use it on a front door.

High gloss and microporous so should last. Goes on without primer with
best results like that as you get the microporous benefits.

http://www.international-paints.co.uk/products/info/10_year_exterior_gloss.
jsp

Not that readily available, not much of a colour range and not cheap but
worth it in my view. I got mine at B&Q but their (shit, shit, shit) site
refuses to find it, despite a google site based search finding refs to
it there.
Thanks, that looks like pretty decent stuff. I notice that Homebase no
longer stock it either but am pretty sure that my local builders
merchant does International paints. Failing that there seem to be
several places that do it online. This is for a flat front door so no
mouldings so I reckon it has to be a pretty good finish for it to look
good. Oh, and despite the limited colours the do a burgundy which is the
chosen colour.
 
A

Andrew May

I've had top results with International 10 Year Exterior Gloss on window
frames and would not hesitate to use it on a front door.

High gloss and microporous so should last. Goes on without primer with
best results like that as you get the microporous benefits.

http://www.international-paints.co.uk/products/info/10_year_exterior_gloss.
jsp

Not that readily available, not much of a colour range and not cheap but
worth it in my view. I got mine at B&Q but their (shit, shit, shit) site
refuses to find it, despite a google site based search finding refs to
it there.
Just a follow-up question to this. The paint is microporous which allows
the wood underneath to breath. But does this imply that all old
non-porous paint has to be stripped off first?

Andrew
 
S

stuart noble

Just a follow-up question to this. The paint is microporous which allows
the wood underneath to breath. But does this imply that all old
non-porous paint has to be stripped off first?

Andrew
I've seen nothing over the years to change my opinion that so called
microporous paints are crap.
 
A

Andrew May

I've seen nothing over the years to change my opinion that so called
microporous paints are crap.
So what would you recommend for exterior woodwork?
 
S

stuart noble

So what would you recommend for exterior woodwork?
A bog standard oil based high voc paint (with the proviso that nothing
will stick to a bad substrate).
I've had success over the years with wood hardeners, or fibreglass resin
if it's cheaper. Once you have a sound surface that doesn't suck the
life out of the paint, it goes on like a dream and stays there. For
resin substitute car body filler if the wood is crumbly.
Sorry, I don't know the state of your woodwork or how old it is. Does it
face south?
 
A

Andrew May

A bog standard oil based high voc paint (with the proviso that nothing
will stick to a bad substrate).
I've had success over the years with wood hardeners, or fibreglass resin
if it's cheaper. Once you have a sound surface that doesn't suck the
life out of the paint, it goes on like a dream and stays there. For
resin substitute car body filler if the wood is crumbly.
Sorry, I don't know the state of your woodwork or how old it is. Does it
face south?
Perfectly sound wooden front door. What I was after was recommendations
based on experience of specific paints to use. Is high VOC paint still
available?
 
S

stuart noble

Perfectly sound wooden front door. What I was after was recommendations
based on experience of specific paints to use. Is high VOC paint still
available?
Sure. I used a green "liquid gloss" paint from Crown for my front door.
It smelt reassuringly nasty, took 24 hours to dry, and dripped
everywhere if you weren't careful. Lovely.
The aisles in the sheds are full of paint products, and they do their
damnedest to confuse customers. I'd have gone to a trade outlet but I
only needed a litre
 
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I

ianp5852

I've seen nothing over the years to change my opinion that so called
microporous paints are crap.
Have you tried Sikkens Rubbol? It might just change your view , if you
want it changing.
We live in quite an exposed position and had new softwood windows
about 12 years ago. Manufacturer specified Sikkens Onol primer and
Rubbol satin top coat. This was followed. I check and do some very
litttle touching up every year or two. South and east elevations
needed full repaint - which constitutes wash down, light sand and one
coat of Rubbol - after about 5 years. Others have been done as needed.
There are a couple which are not very exposed which will be getting
painted for the first time this year...weather permitting!
It is expensive and it does make the wood windows look a bit like
uPVC, which is what we were trying to avoid, but I am a convert. Any
new exterior joinery gets treated the same. I do not know how well it
works on previously painted timber.

Please reply to group - email address is not monitored
Ian
 
S

stuart noble

Have you tried Sikkens Rubbol? It might just change your view , if you
want it changing.
I havent looked seriously but I don't see "microporous" mentioned on the
Sikkens site. It's a silly term anyway because enough coats will block
the pores
 
J

js.b1

Dulux Trade Weathershield can suffer "plastic bag holding water" and
is not over coatable (burn off).

Sikkens Rubbol AZ does not suffer the "plastic water bag" effect, does
not flake, can be overpainted. However you need a sound surface
because it can be intolerant and it does not like fresh putty (shells
off). If you paint fresh hardwood which has high oil content wipe it
with methylated spirits first (eg, Iroko).

Beware the high end Rubol (BZ or CZ or SZ) because they require kiln
dried fresh wood to get their huge life.

International (Akzo Nobel) 10yr gloss is well regarded, it outlasted
weather shield with ease.


Weathershield has an inferior gloss to Rubbol AZ year 1, but by year 4
Rubbol Az can look a little chalky (which is how it wears). Beware
Rubbol is only removeable with mechanical means - a bit like Sikkaflex
225 on your fingers in that respect. Decorating Direct used to do
Rubbol, the colour chart is hard to get hold of re obscure Sikkens
codes... you might get the Sikkens / Dulux Website to deliver for £5
without getting a dented tin like some suppliers. Akzo Nobel tins seem
to be round, ICI tins notorious for not being (plastic bag or store
upside down or kilner jar).

Microporous paint... well the water does get UNDER Dulux weathershield
after a few years :)
 
S

stuart noble

Dulux Trade Weathershield can suffer "plastic bag holding water" and
is not over coatable (burn off).

Sikkens Rubbol AZ does not suffer the "plastic water bag" effect, does
not flake, can be overpainted. However you need a sound surface
because it can be intolerant and it does not like fresh putty (shells
off). If you paint fresh hardwood which has high oil content wipe it
with methylated spirits first (eg, Iroko).

Beware the high end Rubol (BZ or CZ or SZ) because they require kiln
dried fresh wood to get their huge life.

International (Akzo Nobel) 10yr gloss is well regarded, it outlasted
weather shield with ease.


Weathershield has an inferior gloss to Rubbol AZ year 1, but by year 4
Rubbol Az can look a little chalky (which is how it wears). Beware
Rubbol is only removeable with mechanical means - a bit like Sikkaflex
225 on your fingers in that respect. Decorating Direct used to do
Rubbol, the colour chart is hard to get hold of re obscure Sikkens
codes... you might get the Sikkens / Dulux Website to deliver for £5
without getting a dented tin like some suppliers. Akzo Nobel tins seem
to be round, ICI tins notorious for not being (plastic bag or store
upside down or kilner jar).

Microporous paint... well the water does get UNDER Dulux weathershield
after a few years :)
All very interesting but, when all's said and done, any paint will last
forever on a sound surface, and no paint will last long on a less than
perfect surface. The best way to make a surface sound is wood hardener.
I've seen Victorian paint on glass that's as good as the day it dripped
on there. That's what you call a sound surface
 
R

Rod Speed

All very interesting but, when all's said and done, any paint will last
forever on a sound surface, and no paint will last long on a less than
perfect surface.
That last is overstated. The paint I put on concrete blocks is more than
40 year old now and its lasted fine, and may well last another 40 fine too.
The best way to make a surface sound is wood hardener.
I didn't bother.
I've seen Victorian paint on glass that's as good as the day it dripped on
there. That's what you call a sound surface
But you can get very decent paint life with surfaces nothing like that.
 
S

stuart noble

That last is overstated. The paint I put on concrete blocks is more than
40 year old now and its lasted fine, and may well last another 40 fine too.
Your concrete blocks probably are a perfect surface in the sense that,
unlike wood, they don't degrade. It's not the paint that fails, but the
surface it's applied to
 
R

Rod Speed

stuart noble said:
Rod Speed wrote
Your concrete blocks probably are a perfect surface
Not a chance. Nothing like it either.
in the sense that, unlike wood, they don't degrade.
That's nothing like your original.
It's not the paint that fails, but the surface it's applied to
That's just plain wrong. Quite a bit of the time
the paint does indeed degrade and ultimately fail.
 
S

stuart noble

That's just plain wrong. Quite a bit of the time
the paint does indeed degrade and ultimately fail.
Try having this discussion with any paint company who guarantee their
product for x number of years. They will always blame the substrate, and
quite rightly so.
 
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R

Rod Speed

stuart noble said:
Rod Speed wrote
Try having this discussion with any paint company who guarantee their
product for x number of years. They will always blame the substrate,
So what ?
and quite rightly so.
Wrong, as always, most obviously when the paint goes chalky or fades badly.
 

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