Exposed gap between brick rows


J

jamesbget

This is probably quite common but just want to know from others as
never come across this before:
damp has penetrated from the outside under the supporting stone of a
bay window (edwardian terraced) - have removed plaster inside to
expose brick in doing so i notice there is a 3cm air gap between two
brick layers what was there in some places is some kind of ash, this
is easily removed and now exists an air gap right to the outside and
this is all away along on the same line around the bay window

what should i fill this with any suggestions?

thanks James
 
M

meow2222

jamesb...@gmail.com said:
This is probably quite common but just want to know from others as
never come across this before:
damp has penetrated from the outside under the supporting stone of a
bay window (edwardian terraced) - have removed plaster inside to
expose brick in doing so i notice there is a 3cm air gap between two
brick layers what was there in some places is some kind of ash, this
is easily removed and now exists an air gap right to the outside and
this is all away along on the same line around the bay window

what should i fill this with any suggestions?

thanks James
Either lime mortar or 1:1:6.
Lime mortar is 3:1 sand to lime (by volume)
1:1:6 cement:lime:sand, again by volume


NT
 
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A

Andrew Gabriel

This is probably quite common but just want to know from others as
never come across this before:
damp has penetrated from the outside under the supporting stone of a
bay window (edwardian terraced)
"Stone" window sills in edwardian houses are quite often actually
rendered bricks (cement, not lime). Keep an eye out for cracks in
the render which can cause the effect you're seeing (and eventually
the render will break off by frost action once water gets in).
Also check the drip channel on the underneath hasn't been blocked
with excess coats of paint, allowing water to run back under the
sill. The render coat under the window frame may not be very
waterproof (original window frames were often deliberately put in
place before the render set in order to make a good seal, but any
replacement PVC windows which could be leaking water from the
frames might well leak through the render).
 
J

jamesbget

"Stone" window sills inedwardianhouses are quite often actually
rendered bricks (cement, not lime). Keep an eye out for cracks in
the render which can cause the effect you're seeing (and eventually
the render will break off by frost action once water gets in).
Also check the drip channel on the underneath hasn't been blocked
with excess coats of paint, allowing water to run back under the
sill. The render coat under the window frame may not be very
waterproof (original window frames were often deliberately put in
place before the render set in order to make a good seal, but any
replacement PVC windows which could be leaking water from the
frames might well leak through the render).
 
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J

jamesbget

"Stone" window sills inedwardianhouses are quite often actually
rendered bricks (cement, not lime). Keep an eye out for cracks in
the render which can cause the effect you're seeing (and eventually
the render will break off by frost action once water gets in).
Also check the drip channel on the underneath hasn't been blocked
with excess coats of paint, allowing water to run back under the
sill. The render coat under the window frame may not be very
waterproof (original window frames were often deliberately put in
place before the render set in order to make a good seal, but any
replacement PVC windows which could be leaking water from the
frames might well leak through the render).
the problem its not under the window pane itself but the supporting
stone/cement block which was had mortar originally with carbon and
ash to the brick bellow removing this layer has exposed a gap of 3cm
all the way round the bay - hoping that the window is still supported
by the two ends - will render as advised and seal properly checking
that channel as you have advised - thanks
 

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