Exposed Brick Wall - removing plaster


G

Gioconda

Thanks folks, for the replies....

"Bare in mind that the walls which were intended to be plastered
will have been built by the apprentice using the B-grade bricks.
Don't presume you'll necessarily have nice tidy brickwork behind
the plaster."


Quite...It is a Victorian house, and I'm guessing the brickwork won'
be spectacular - any ideas how to spruce it up, in case it looks lik
it's been used as a firing squad wall?

BTW 'Brick Acid'???? What on earth..
 
A

Andrew Gabriel

Thanks folks, for the replies....

"Bare in mind that the walls which were intended to be plastered
will have been built by the apprentice using the B-grade bricks.
Don't presume you'll necessarily have nice tidy brickwork behind
the plaster."


Quite...It is a Victorian house, and I'm guessing the brickwork won't
be spectacular - any ideas how to spruce it up, in case it looks like
it's been used as a firing squad wall?

BTW 'Brick Acid'???? What on earth..?
Hydrochloric acid, probably not very clean, in a large container
from a builders merchant. I wouldn't personally use it on a
Victorian lime mortar wall, as I suspect it will dissolve the
mortar (which is essentially just chalk) very quickly ;-).
The rate of CO2 generation might even pose a suffocation hazard,
just before the building collapses on you...
 
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T

The Natural Philosopher

Gioconda said:
Thanks folks, for the replies....

"Bare in mind that the walls which were intended to be plastered
will have been built by the apprentice using the B-grade bricks.
Don't presume you'll necessarily have nice tidy brickwork behind
the plaster."


Quite...It is a Victorian house, and I'm guessing the brickwork won't
be spectacular - any ideas how to spruce it up, in case it looks like
it's been used as a firing squad wall?

BTW 'Brick Acid'???? What on earth..?
30% hydrochloric formulated for removing cement stains from bricks OK?
 
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T

The Natural Philosopher

Andrew said:
Hydrochloric acid, probably not very clean, in a large container
from a builders merchant. I wouldn't personally use it on a
Victorian lime mortar wall, as I suspect it will dissolve the
mortar (which is essentially just chalk) very quickly ;-).
The rate of CO2 generation might even pose a suffocation hazard,
just before the building collapses on you...
Get a little hydorgen suplhide as well.
Its not as aggressive as you think. you can appluy with a paint brush
and miss out the mortar.

It is a perfectly sane approach, and a lot les disty, though very wet...

howeever else you do the job, you will need to finish up with it to
bring up the brick color.
 

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