egg/sulphur smells from washing machine


A

Alan Simpson

hi,

I did a search and found some postings about this on this newsgroup
before, including the one copied below.

The sulphur/eggy smell mentioned there is exactly the smell that we
get.

Interestingly, it only seems to happen during the rinse/draining
cycles when we run the washing machine. Also, it does not happen at
any other time when using that same drain (like most washing machines
in the kitchen that I have seen, it is connected to the kitchen sink
drain).

Unfortunately, the smell has been getting worse and worse over the
past few weeks.

However, in the case of this posting there was no follow-up to suggest
how to deal with this problem, if it is a problem with the rubber in
the hoses.

(1) Is there an easy way to confirm that this is, in fact, caused by
the rubber hoses as proposed below?

(2) If we can confirm this, then what action should we take?

thanks,

Alan

From: VisionSet ([email protected])
Subject: Re: Bad drain smell


View this article only
Newsgroups: uk.d-i-y
Date: 2001-08-12 07:32:19 PST


One cause with such appliances is sulphur gasses building up in the
rubber
hoses (which actually comes out of the rubber).
When the appliance is used the gasses are flushed out.
 
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A

Andrew Mawson

Alan Simpson said:
hi,

I did a search and found some postings about this on this newsgroup
before, including the one copied below.

The sulphur/eggy smell mentioned there is exactly the smell that we
get.

Interestingly, it only seems to happen during the rinse/draining
cycles when we run the washing machine. Also, it does not happen at
any other time when using that same drain (like most washing machines
in the kitchen that I have seen, it is connected to the kitchen sink
drain).

Unfortunately, the smell has been getting worse and worse over the
past few weeks.

However, in the case of this posting there was no follow-up to suggest
how to deal with this problem, if it is a problem with the rubber in
the hoses.

(1) Is there an easy way to confirm that this is, in fact, caused by
the rubber hoses as proposed below?

(2) If we can confirm this, then what action should we take?

thanks,

Alan

From: VisionSet ([email protected])
Subject: Re: Bad drain smell


View this article only
Newsgroups: uk.d-i-y
Date: 2001-08-12 07:32:19 PST


One cause with such appliances is sulphur gasses building up in the
rubber
hoses (which actually comes out of the rubber).
When the appliance is used the gasses are flushed out.
Mike,

Could it be that something is stuck in the pump body, and when draining the
impellor is heating it up by friction?

If you can get at it, most consist of a two part plastic body clipped
together to form the space round the impellor and by unclipping you can
removed the old socks, bra wires, coins, and cabbages that get stuck there !

Andrew Mawson
 
A

Alan Simpson

Andrew Mawson said:
Could it be that something is stuck in the pump body, and when draining the
impellor is heating it up by friction?

If you can get at it, most consist of a two part plastic body clipped
together to form the space round the impellor and by unclipping you can
removed the old socks, bra wires, coins, and cabbages that get stuck there !

Andrew Mawson
hi Andrew,

thanks for your reply.

Interestingly, the first time I opened the pump drain, we did find a
sock and some other odds and ends there. But removing those did not
help with the smell.

So, next question. How do I get access to the plastic body around the
impellor?

I guess that
(1) remove back
(2) find plastic body around impellor (at the bottom, I imagine, near
where I access the pump drain).
(3) do as you wrote above.

Does that sound sensible?

thanks again,

Alan
 
E

EricP

hi,

I did a search and found some postings about this on this newsgroup
before, including the one copied below.

The sulphur/eggy smell mentioned there is exactly the smell that we
get.
You may also get a smell like this if the brushes on one of the motors
are wearing out. There may also be a cracking/popping noise.
 
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A

Alan Simpson

thanks OldScrawn (??),

the only problem with that explanation is that it uses the same waste
stack, trap and drain as the kitchen sink and when we use the kitchen
sink, there is never such a smell.

It is only when the washing machine is draining that you can smell
this, so we're inclined to point the finger there. Also we have
already found some miscellaneous items, including a sock, in the pump
drain at the bottom of the washing machine. Hence the washing machine
does seem to be a reasonable culprit.

We are happy to be shown to be wrong though.
 

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