Creating a replacement section of skirting board - can't find sizeoff-the-shelf


D

Dougie Nisbet

I've redecorated a room and thrown out an old electric fire that was
against the wall. The base of the fire was thick wood and the skirting
board had been removed so the fire could press flush to the wall. So I'm
left with about a metre of missing skirting board with a zig-zag cutout
at each end where the fire used to be.

I walked around B&Q and had a look at their skirting but none were the
same. I've had a look on the web and I think what I have is "Chamfered
Bullnosed Skirting" according to
http://www.haymanlimited.co.uk/joinery/shop/Products.cfm?id=2

It is 15-17mm thick (hard to tell exactly because of the paint) 95mm
high. The chamfer starts 70mm from the bottom, and the horizontal bit at
the top is 5-6mm.

Looking around the house I see there are other places where there are
bits of missing skirting board and I'm considering whether it's worth
the time and effort doing the job myself. Especially if it's going to
involve fiddly sizes and if the skirting is not available off the shelf.

However woodwork is not something I've done much off and I'm not sure
where to start. Leafing through my DIY books I see mentions of mitres
and tenon saws and such. Although my books mention skirting boards, they
only mention it from the point of view of replacement, whereas I'm
wondering how I'd cut a bit of wood to create the replacement in the
first place. Is that what a router does? Since there are no complicated
curvy bits to the chamfer (I even thought of using my jigsaw at an angle
and putting a block of wood in the workbench) I'm thinking I might give
it a go.

On the other hand, if I could find a local timber merchant (just moved
into the area so still finding the local outlets) and told them the
dimensions would they be likely to cut a piece to size?

Still not sure how I'm going to proceed with this. Any thoughts/advice
welcome.

Dougie
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

Guy King

The message <[email protected]>
from Dougie Nisbet said:
On the other hand, if I could find a local timber merchant (just moved
into the area so still finding the local outlets) and told them the
dimensions would they be likely to cut a piece to size?
Take them a section, or cut a cardboard template and take them that. A
good woodyard should be able to match it easily.
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

However woodwork is not something I've done much off and I'm not sure
where to start. Leafing through my DIY books I see mentions of mitres
and tenon saws and such. Although my books mention skirting boards, they
only mention it from the point of view of replacement, whereas I'm
wondering how I'd cut a bit of wood to create the replacement in the
first place. Is that what a router does? Since there are no complicated
curvy bits to the chamfer (I even thought of using my jigsaw at an angle
and putting a block of wood in the workbench) I'm thinking I might give
it a go.
With a bit of skill you can create bull nose skirting with just a plane.
It would be easiest to replace the entire piece rather than patch the
existing. Being across a fireplace, it will be mitred at each end.
Try and find a piece of timber with exactly the same thickness as the
original - perhaps from a reclaim yard if it's old. The height doesn't
matter so much as it can be cut down.
 
R

rrh

Dougie Nisbet said:
I've redecorated a room and thrown out an old electric fire that was
against the wall. The base of the fire was thick wood and the skirting
board had been removed so the fire could press flush to the wall. So I'm
left with about a metre of missing skirting board with a zig-zag cutout at
each end where the fire used to be.

I walked around B&Q and had a look at their skirting but none were the
same. I've had a look on the web and I think what I have is "Chamfered
Bullnosed Skirting" according to
http://www.haymanlimited.co.uk/joinery/shop/Products.cfm?id=2

It is 15-17mm thick (hard to tell exactly because of the paint) 95mm high.
The chamfer starts 70mm from the bottom, and the horizontal bit at the top
is 5-6mm.

Looking around the house I see there are other places where there are bits
of missing skirting board and I'm considering whether it's worth the time
and effort doing the job myself. Especially if it's going to involve
fiddly sizes and if the skirting is not available off the shelf.

However woodwork is not something I've done much off and I'm not sure
where to start. Leafing through my DIY books I see mentions of mitres and
tenon saws and such. Although my books mention skirting boards, they only
mention it from the point of view of replacement, whereas I'm wondering
how I'd cut a bit of wood to create the replacement in the first place. Is
that what a router does? Since there are no complicated curvy bits to the
chamfer (I even thought of using my jigsaw at an angle and putting a block
of wood in the workbench) I'm thinking I might give it a go.

On the other hand, if I could find a local timber merchant (just moved
into the area so still finding the local outlets) and told them the
dimensions would they be likely to cut a piece to size?

Still not sure how I'm going to proceed with this. Any thoughts/advice
welcome.

Dougie
Are you sure B&Q "dual pattern skirt 15x96mm" (about a tenner for 4 x 2.4m)
won't suit? Looks exactly like some of mine for which the aforementioned
will do v well. Obviously the pattern differs on each side so the profile
isn't exactly like the one you linked to.
 
R

Roger Mills

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Dougie Nisbet said:
I've redecorated a room and thrown out an old electric fire that was
against the wall. The base of the fire was thick wood and the skirting
board had been removed so the fire could press flush to the wall. So
I'm left with about a metre of missing skirting board with a zig-zag
cutout at each end where the fire used to be.

I walked around B&Q and had a look at their skirting but none were the
same. I've had a look on the web and I think what I have is "Chamfered
Bullnosed Skirting" according to
http://www.haymanlimited.co.uk/joinery/shop/Products.cfm?id=2

It is 15-17mm thick (hard to tell exactly because of the paint) 95mm
high. The chamfer starts 70mm from the bottom, and the horizontal bit
at the top is 5-6mm.

Looking around the house I see there are other places where there are
bits of missing skirting board and I'm considering whether it's worth
the time and effort doing the job myself. Especially if it's going to
involve fiddly sizes and if the skirting is not available off the
shelf.
However woodwork is not something I've done much off and I'm not sure
where to start. Leafing through my DIY books I see mentions of mitres
and tenon saws and such. Although my books mention skirting boards,
they only mention it from the point of view of replacement, whereas
I'm wondering how I'd cut a bit of wood to create the replacement in
the first place. Is that what a router does? Since there are no
complicated curvy bits to the chamfer (I even thought of using my
jigsaw at an angle and putting a block of wood in the workbench) I'm
thinking I might give it a go.

On the other hand, if I could find a local timber merchant (just moved
into the area so still finding the local outlets) and told them the
dimensions would they be likely to cut a piece to size?

Still not sure how I'm going to proceed with this. Any thoughts/advice
welcome.

Dougie

I would just get a length of 4"x1" planed timber - which will be almost the
right size, but rectangular in cross-section - and remove some material with
a plane in order to produce the required chamfer. A power plane would be
best - but you could do short lengths with a hand plane if necessary.
--
Cheers,
Roger
______
Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
 
T

The3rd Earl Of Derby

Dougie said:
I've redecorated a room and thrown out an old electric fire that was
against the wall. The base of the fire was thick wood and the skirting
board had been removed so the fire could press flush to the wall. So
I'm left with about a metre of missing skirting board with a zig-zag
cutout at each end where the fire used to be.

I walked around B&Q and had a look at their skirting but none were the
same. I've had a look on the web and I think what I have is "Chamfered
Bullnosed Skirting" according to
http://www.haymanlimited.co.uk/joinery/shop/Products.cfm?id=2

It is 15-17mm thick (hard to tell exactly because of the paint) 95mm
high. The chamfer starts 70mm from the bottom, and the horizontal bit
at the top is 5-6mm.

Looking around the house I see there are other places where there are
bits of missing skirting board and I'm considering whether it's worth
the time and effort doing the job myself. Especially if it's going to
involve fiddly sizes and if the skirting is not available off the
shelf.

However woodwork is not something I've done much off and I'm not sure
where to start. Leafing through my DIY books I see mentions of mitres
and tenon saws and such. Although my books mention skirting boards,
they only mention it from the point of view of replacement, whereas
I'm wondering how I'd cut a bit of wood to create the replacement in
the first place. Is that what a router does? Since there are no
complicated curvy bits to the chamfer (I even thought of using my
jigsaw at an angle and putting a block of wood in the workbench) I'm
thinking I might give it a go.

On the other hand, if I could find a local timber merchant (just moved
into the area so still finding the local outlets) and told them the
dimensions would they be likely to cut a piece to size?

Still not sure how I'm going to proceed with this. Any thoughts/advice
welcome.

Dougie
This is summising the skirting is the same in all rooms?

Replace the skirting in the smallest room with todays type and use the old
skirting to replace the bits that are missing in other rooms. :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

The Medway Handyman

The3rd said:
This is summising the skirting is the same in all rooms?

Replace the skirting in the smallest room with todays type and use
the old skirting to replace the bits that are missing in other rooms.
:)
What an outstandingly good idea! Lateral thinking at it's best!


--
Dave
The Medway Handyman
www.medwayhandyman.co.uk
01634 717930
07850 597257
 
T

The3rd Earl Of Derby

Stuart said:
That's if the plaster behind doesn't collapse and you can get the
fixings out etc.
You must be going about it the wrong way then?

The secret is to find the nails and using a nail punch&hammer,hammer the
nails right through the skirting, with a stanley knife score the wall at
the top of the skirting all the way along and the skirting should then fall
away from wall.
Not a good idea to patch skirting IME. Replacing the whole section
with something close is less obvious than trying to insert a bit of
the same profile.
Your not very good at this are you.
I would have thought a timber merchant will have at least 3 chamfered
skirtings to choose from
They might but the thickness and height are not always the same as a period
house. :)
 
R

raden

Guy King said:
The message <[email protected]>


Take them a section, or cut a cardboard template and take them that. A
good woodyard should be able to match it easily.
But probably not very cheaply - tooling costs money nowadays
 
G

Guy King

The message <[email protected]>
from Chris Bacon said:
"They" (Jewson's, and similar) charge about £20 as a setting-up
fee. Sawn timber is then fed through and you get the moulding.
Until new H&S regulations, the result of European machinations,
that was that. Now they are reluctant to make any old moulding,
and need the cutters "available". Big step forward; *not*.
Luckily my local place don't seem to have heard of this nonsense.
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

The3rd Earl Of Derby

Dougie Nisbet wrote:

But your idea, so blindingly obvious that I'm going
to pretend to people I thought of it :) solves my short term problem.
My solicitor will be in touch. ;-)
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top