Crazy Painting problem - NEED SERIOUS HELP


F

Finman

I am pulling my hair out. I had a bedroom and bathroom constructed in
my basement. 5 days after the drywall had been mudded and sanded I
put on one coat of Kilz Oil based primer. The next day I put on a
coat of satin latex based Behr paint on the ceiling. 1 day following
the ceiling paint I used Behr Bed and Bath paint on the walls, WITHOUT
cutting in, I was leaving the cut in for last (doesn't make sense I
know). I followed that up the following night with a second top
coat. The second coat was applied pretty thick with a 3/4" nap. That
night I left a window open in the basement to help alleviated the
smell. It got down to 45 degrees that night and I had 65% humidity in
the basement. When I checked the bathroom the following morning there
was sweat all over the walls. There was even a small amount of sweat
above the shower where there would be green board (the shower has
never been used). That's my first mystery. I let the room sit for two
days without touching it. After two days I went to remove the tape
and the layers of top coat peeled away in many areas when I tried to
remove the tape. The walls felt like they could have been a slight
bit dusty underneath. I'm trying to figure out what caused these
issues and what I should do next. PLEASE HELP!!
 
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N

Noozer

Finman said:
I am pulling my hair out. I had a bedroom and bathroom constructed in
my basement. 5 days after the drywall had been mudded and sanded I
put on one coat of Kilz Oil based primer. The next day I put on a
coat of satin latex based Behr paint on the ceiling.
You can't put Latex over oil... Scrape down the walls the best you can and
repaint with oil.
 
O

Oren

The walls felt like they could have been a slight
bit dusty underneath.
Preparation of the walls are the most important and most time
consuming. Painting is easier.
 
T

Tony Hwang

Finman said:
I am pulling my hair out. I had a bedroom and bathroom constructed in
my basement. 5 days after the drywall had been mudded and sanded I
put on one coat of Kilz Oil based primer. The next day I put on a
coat of satin latex based Behr paint on the ceiling. 1 day following
the ceiling paint I used Behr Bed and Bath paint on the walls, WITHOUT
cutting in, I was leaving the cut in for last (doesn't make sense I
know). I followed that up the following night with a second top
coat. The second coat was applied pretty thick with a 3/4" nap. That
night I left a window open in the basement to help alleviated the
smell. It got down to 45 degrees that night and I had 65% humidity in
the basement. When I checked the bathroom the following morning there
was sweat all over the walls. There was even a small amount of sweat
above the shower where there would be green board (the shower has
never been used). That's my first mystery. I let the room sit for two
days without touching it. After two days I went to remove the tape
and the layers of top coat peeled away in many areas when I tried to
remove the tape. The walls felt like they could have been a slight
bit dusty underneath. I'm trying to figure out what caused these
issues and what I should do next. PLEASE HELP!!
Hi,
Holly cow! What's the rush? Oil and Latex? I don't get it.
For me using anything oil is thing of past! No exhaust fan in the bath
room?
 
W

willshak

You can't put Latex over oil... Scrape down the walls the best you can and
repaint with oil.
Fron: http://www.kilz.com/pages/default.aspx?NavID=23

"KILZ Original primer/sealer will dry to the touch in 30 minutes and can
be recoated or topcoated in one hour with *either latex or oil-based
paint*. It makes an excellent enamel undercoater, leaving the surface
well prepared for a smooth, enamel finish."
 
S

Sacramento Dave

Tony Hwang said:
Hi,
Holly cow! What's the rush? Oil and Latex? I don't get it.
For me using anything oil is thing of past! No exhaust fan in the bath
room?
Kilz I believe is a lacquer, I've used it many times on walls mostly
stained it keeps the stains from bleeding threw. I have never had a problem
putting latex over it. On a newly taped wall usually you use PVA to seal it.
 
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M

marson

Kilz I believe is a lacquer, I've used it many times on walls mostly
stained it keeps the stains from bleeding threw. I have never had a problem
putting latex over it. On a newly taped wall usually you use PVA to seal it.
I'm wondering how bad it is really peeling. If the chips are big, like
fingernail size or bigger, then I'd say you have adhesion problems.
But even the best paint jobs will chip when you pull the masking tape,
if you leave it on too long. Masking tape should be pulled as soon as
possible. You should also score the cut line with a razor knife,
especially if you have waited too long before pulling it. Really, pro
painters don't use a lot of masking tape. It is better to cut with a
brush.

As for the condensation, that happened because paint introduced a lot
of moisture into the air, and by opening the window, the air got below
the dew point. Shouldn't really cause any problems provided the paint
was dry to the touch before water got to it.
 
F

Finman

I'm wondering how bad it is really peeling. If the chips are big, like
fingernail size or bigger, then I'd say you have adhesion problems.
But even the best paint jobs will chip when you pull the masking tape,
if you leave it on too long. Masking tape should be pulled as soon as
possible. You should also score the cut line with a razor knife,
especially if you have waited too long before pulling it. Really, pro
painters don't use a lot of masking tape. It is better to cut with a
brush.

As for the condensation, that happened because paint introduced a lot
of moisture into the air, and by opening the window, the air got below
the dew point. Shouldn't really cause any problems provided the paint
was dry to the touch before water got to it.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
I could peel the paint approx. 1" in many places. It is not just a
little chip.
I used oil based because I wanted a "no odor" primer and that was all
I could find. No latex available in no odor that I know of.
 
F

Finman

Preparation of the walls are the most important and most time
consuming. Painting is easier.
What is this suppose to mean? It is not even relevant.
 
T

Tony Hwang

Finman said:
I could peel the paint approx. 1" in many places. It is not just a
little chip.
I used oil based because I wanted a "no odor" primer and that was all
I could find. No latex available in no odor that I know of.
Hi,
I think the wall was not really dry. And the low temp did not help
either. Can you heat the room or use a portable heater?
 
F

Finman

Hi,
I think the wall was not really dry. And the low temp did not help
either. Can you heat the room or use a portable heater?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
I could use a portable heater. How can I tell if it is dry or not?
 
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F

Finman

Hi,
I think the wall was not really dry. And the low temp did not help
either. Can you heat the room or use a portable heater?- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
I used a portable heater in the room all night. This morning when I
try to peel additional paint off it seems to be much more resistant.
I'm starting to think that it was not fully dry when I tried to remove
the tape.
I appreciate all of the advice that I have received here. Thank you
to everyone for lending a helping hand!
 
J

John Grabowski

Finman said:
I am pulling my hair out. I had a bedroom and bathroom constructed in
my basement. 5 days after the drywall had been mudded and sanded I
put on one coat of Kilz Oil based primer. The next day I put on a
coat of satin latex based Behr paint on the ceiling. 1 day following
the ceiling paint I used Behr Bed and Bath paint on the walls, WITHOUT
cutting in, I was leaving the cut in for last (doesn't make sense I
know). I followed that up the following night with a second top
coat. The second coat was applied pretty thick with a 3/4" nap. That
night I left a window open in the basement to help alleviated the
smell. It got down to 45 degrees that night and I had 65% humidity in
the basement. When I checked the bathroom the following morning there
was sweat all over the walls. There was even a small amount of sweat
above the shower where there would be green board (the shower has
never been used). That's my first mystery. I let the room sit for two
days without touching it. After two days I went to remove the tape
and the layers of top coat peeled away in many areas when I tried to
remove the tape. The walls felt like they could have been a slight
bit dusty underneath. I'm trying to figure out what caused these
issues and what I should do next. PLEASE HELP!!
Years ago a painter told me about the best primer to use on new walls.
Muralo is very thin and it is quickly absorbed into the wall board sealing
it up. I always use Benjamin Moore on top of that with great results. I
used Behr once so I understand why you put on a thick second coat.

As others have stated, you obviously had too much moisture in the room as a
result of it being in the basement and from the moisture from the paint
trying to evaporate. The cold air caused condensation.

Masking tape should be removed promptly after applying paint. In your case
the paint under the tape was not completely dry. It can take several days
for paint to cure completely even though it is dry to the touch. Run your
fingernail into the paint and see if it makes a dent. If it does the paint
is still soft underneath.

At this point I think that you should let everything dry out for a week or
more. Look at the temperature limitations on the paint can and make sure
that the room stays above that. Repaint next week and put a small fan in
the room. Keep the windows shut if it cold outside. Buy a respirator so you
can work with the smell.
 
D

dadiOH

Finman said:
I used a portable heater in the room all night. This morning when I
try to peel additional paint off it seems to be much more resistant.
I'm starting to think that it was not fully dry when I tried to
remove the tape.
Paint takes at least a week to dry.
 
D

Doug Miller

You can't put Latex over oil... Scrape down the walls the best you can and
repaint with oil.
Bzzt -- wrong answer. Latex over oil *primer* is perfectly fine.
 
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R

rricker300

I am pulling my hair out. I had a bedroom and bathroom constructed in
my basement. 5 days after the drywall had been mudded and sanded I
put on one coat of Kilz Oil based primer. The next day I put on a
coat of satin latex based Behr paint on the ceiling. 1 day following
the ceiling paint I used Behr Bed and Bath paint on the walls, WITHOUT
cutting in, I was leaving the cut in for last (doesn't make sense I
know). I followed that up the following night with a second top
coat. The second coat was applied pretty thick with a 3/4" nap. That
night I left a window open in the basement to help alleviated the
smell. It got down to 45 degrees that night and I had 65% humidity in
the basement. When I checked the bathroom the following morning there
was sweat all over the walls. There was even a small amount of sweat
above the shower where there would be green board (the shower has
never been used). That's my first mystery. I let the room sit for two
days without touching it. After two days I went to remove the tape
and the layers of top coat peeled away in many areas when I tried to
remove the tape. The walls felt like they could have been a slight
bit dusty underneath. I'm trying to figure out what caused these
issues and what I should do next. PLEASE HELP!!
rather than paint with oil (yuck!) I'd scrape down the wall and then
reprime with Zinsser Bulls-Eye 123 latex primer. It will cover any
clean surface without sanding. You can even prime glass with this
stuff. Then repaint with latex. If you live in the Midwest, you can
pick it up at Menard's, if not I am sure you can find it at Home Depot
or Lowe's or Google it and find a local supplier. -It probably was the
dust. You definately can paint latex over an oil based primer. just
not over oil based paint. try keeping the windows closed and opening
any heat vents that may be down there. cook that paint a little and it
will give you a nice finish! 45 degrees is a bit cool for interior
paint. It was probably the mix of cold outside and warm inside that
caused the sweating. keeping the windows closed will prevent that.
 

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