Connections for main earth bonding to gas/water?


L

Lobster

I need to connect up earth bonding conductors to my incoming gas and
water supplies, and have just checked Whitfield's "Electrician's Guide"
to double-check which side of the respective stop cocks to attach the
bonding.

For an all-copper system like mine, Whitfield shows the water pipe
earthed on the *street* side of the stopcock, whereas the gas pipe it is
on the *house* side of the stopcock (Fig 5.13). I'm assuming that's
correct but can't understand the logic behind it - before I unpack my
earth clamps please can someone explain?!

Thanks
David
 
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R

Roger Mills

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Lobster said:
I need to connect up earth bonding conductors to my incoming gas and
water supplies, and have just checked Whitfield's "Electrician's
Guide" to double-check which side of the respective stop cocks to
attach the bonding.

For an all-copper system like mine, Whitfield shows the water pipe
earthed on the *street* side of the stopcock, whereas the gas pipe it
is on the *house* side of the stopcock (Fig 5.13). I'm assuming that's
correct but can't understand the logic behind it - before I unpack my
earth clamps please can someone explain?!

Thanks
David
Assuming that the stopcocks and the pipes either side are all made of
conducting material, does it really matter?
--
Cheers,
Roger
______
Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!
 
B

Bob Eager

I need to connect up earth bonding conductors to my incoming gas and
water supplies, and have just checked Whitfield's "Electrician's Guide"
to double-check which side of the respective stop cocks to attach the
bonding.

For an all-copper system like mine, Whitfield shows the water pipe
earthed on the *street* side of the stopcock, whereas the gas pipe it is
on the *house* side of the stopcock (Fig 5.13). I'm assuming that's
correct but can't understand the logic behind it - before I unpack my
earth clamps please can someone explain?!
The OSG clearly states that "the connection to the gas, water, oil etc.
service should be within 600mm of the service meter, or at the point of
entry to the building if the service meter is external, and must be on
the consumer's side before any branch pipework...". Refers to 547-02-02
in the regs. The regs also say that if there is an insulating section at
that point, or a meter, the connection should be made to the consumer's
hard metal pipework. So, if there isn't a meter, have it as near to the
point of entry as possible, so that will determine which side of the
stopcock you choose. Perhaps that's what Whitfield is getting at.

(I have the blue versions of OSG and regs).
 
D

Dave Plowman (News)

For an all-copper system like mine, Whitfield shows the water pipe
earthed on the *street* side of the stopcock, whereas the gas pipe it is
on the *house* side of the stopcock (Fig 5.13). I'm assuming that's
correct but can't understand the logic behind it - before I unpack my
earth clamps please can someone explain?!

I must be Irish - to be sure to be sure - but always bond both sides of
the stopcock and gas meter/cutoff valve. Clamps ain't expensive.
 
A

ARWadsworth

Dave Plowman (News) said:
I must be Irish - to be sure to be sure - but always bond both sides of
the stopcock and gas meter/cutoff valve. Clamps ain't expensive.

--
*Upon the advice of my attorney, my shirt bears no message at this time

Dave Plowman (e-mail address removed) London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
I believe that the gas companies now put electrical insulators in their
meters and do not want you to bond at their side of the supply to stop
currents in their pipework.

Adam
 
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G

gort

Assuming that the stopcocks and the pipes either side are all made of
conducting material, does it really matter?
It does if its Gas, see Andys reply.

Dave
 
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