Concrete repair


C

Chris Smith

Hey,

I'm looking for ways to repair a monolithic concrete slab foundation.
This is NOT for a habitable space. I'm renovating a shed built in 1926,
and will continue to use it just for storage, but I'd like to do what I
can. The existing concrete slab is currently exposed as the floor,
though I intend to install a plywood subfloor now. I'm dealing with a
lot of cracks and dings and what appear to be notches in the side for
lowered door sills.

I've already got some vinyl "concrete patch" substance from my local
Ace, which will probably work okay for the cracks... but if there's a
more dramatic way to fix the slab that doesn't require tearing down the
shed and isn't too expensive, I'd like to know about it. I've thought
about trying to just pour new concrete over the existing slab, but the
new concrete would just crack again, right?

(Again, I'm NOT trying to make the space habitable, and if it's the best
choice, I'll just leave the slab as is and just install the new
subfloor. I just want to find out if there are reasonable options for
repairing it BEFORE I cover the slab.)

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
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M

mark Ransley

have you thought about Solar options windows etc. , why wont they
work, what is you location , Zone .
 
C

Chris Smith

mark said:
so what are you putting in that cant freeze
If you are that curious, it's various kinds of chemicals. Safety
concerns forbid storing them where they can freeze, mostly because they
might crack their containers by expanding too much, and then when they
melt again, the chemical is corrosive or toxic. (And yes, of course I'm
using appropriate fireproof cabinets, separating storage, and all that
stuff, too.)

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
C

Chris Smith

Brennan said:
A couple of thoughts that may be of use.I'm going to skip over the
causes of the cracking,whether it be due to elastic soils or frost heave or
whatever. Dealing with those is expensive and if I read your note correctly
it's not a road you want to go down.
Right. The way I figure it, this thing has been here since 1926, and
there's a good chance it's been cracked for about as long. I'd like to
have a perfect foundation, but in the long run it's not worth very much
to me.

The rest of this sounds like exactly what I was looking for. Thanks!

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
C

Chris Smith

mark said:
have you thought about Solar options windows etc. , why wont they
work, what is you location , Zone .
Mark,

No, I haven't thought too much about windows and solar power. When the
temperature gets down to -10 at night in the middle of the winter, I
don't imagine solar power doing much good, and I imagine windows doing a
good bit of harm (though the place does have a small one).

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
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J

james w lazenby

Let me add one further option for your consideration . . .
not a suggestion, as I don't know the condition of your
slab, etc., or what you want for an end result.

If nothing appears to have failed, other than your
26-year-old slab cracking, just address the slab portion.

Instead of jack-hammering to roughen the existing concrete
slab, jack-hammer to complete break-up the old slab into
manageable rubble. Compact that rubble reasonably level,
add a vapor barrier and pour a whole new slab over your
newly prepared base.

Consider, then, omitting your plywood, etc., as you will
have a new floor.

Jim
Chris Smith said:
Right. The way I figure it, this thing has been here since 1926, and
there's a good chance it's been cracked for about as long. I'd like to
have a perfect foundation, but in the long run it's not worth very much
to me.

The rest of this sounds like exactly what I was looking
for. Thanks!
 
C

Chris Smith

james said:
If nothing appears to have failed, other than your
26-year-old slab cracking, just address the slab portion.
(77-yo, actually, but same thing...)
Instead of jack-hammering to roughen the existing concrete
slab, jack-hammer to complete break-up the old slab into
manageable rubble. Compact that rubble reasonably level,
add a vapor barrier and pour a whole new slab over your
newly prepared base.
That's an interesting idea, but I really don't want to move the existing
structure to repair the concrete. I'm looking for something easy, and
if it doesn't exist I'll gladly go ahead and keep the foundation. I
think it did all the settling it's going to do 50 years ago, and I doubt
there's going to be real problems with the concrete.
Consider, then, omitting your plywood, etc., as you will
have a new floor.
Not an option, since the point of the floor is insulation. Building
department wants it in order to meet some sort of energy conservation
standards, and I want to make the building as energy-efficient as
possible anyway since I'll be paying to heat it.

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
D

dj

I think the answer to you original question is no.
and if it has been there for close to 80 years, you are probably right that
it wont be going anywhere soon.
and as most of the problems are really aesthetic: who cares what it looks
like under the floating floor?
(as slong as you have a somewhat level surface)

mtcw

dj
 
Z

zantino

If height is not an issue, how about framing a 2 x 4 floor on top of the
existing cracked concrete slab, and screwing it into the walls, supporting
it in the low spots. Then of course insulating the floor with fibreglass
and a vapour barrier on top, and then your plywood.

Zantino
 
C

Chris Smith

zantino said:
If height is not an issue, how about framing a 2 x 4 floor on top of the
existing cracked concrete slab, and screwing it into the walls, supporting
it in the low spots. Then of course insulating the floor with fibreglass
and a vapour barrier on top, and then your plywood.
Wow, that's pretty close to what I did. Height was an issue, and I made
the floor "joists" from 2x2 pieces instead of 2x4. I also used foam
insulation instead of fiberglass.

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
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Z

zantino

That's even better, I have a similiar situation in my garage and plan to do
the same...

later.....
 
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Joined
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Hey,

I'm looking for ways to repair a monolithic concrete slab foundation.
This is NOT for a habitable space. I'm renovating a shed built in 1926,
and will continue to use it just for storage, but I'd like to do what I
can. The existing concrete slab is currently exposed as the floor,
though I intend to install a plywood subfloor now. I'm dealing with a
lot of cracks and dings and what appear to be notches in the side for
lowered door sills.

I've already got some vinyl "concrete patch" substance from my local
Ace, which will probably work okay for the cracks... but if there's a
more dramatic way to fix the slab that doesn't require tearing down the
shed and isn't too expensive, I'd like to know about it. I've thought
about trying to just pour new concrete over the existing slab, but the
new concrete would just crack again, right?

(Again, I'm NOT trying to make the space habitable, and if it's the best
choice, I'll just leave the slab as is and just install the new
subfloor. I just want to find out if there are reasonable options for
repairing it BEFORE I cover the slab.)

--
concrete repair Utah
The Easiest Way to Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
I'm back again for more advice... this forum is becoming my new home as I find more and more tasks to fill my days during this time. I've had great luck thus far and hope to get some more help. We have a detached garage that has a pretty mangled floor due to 2 massive trees that used to be right beside it. A full garage floor repair is not in the budget for a couple years most likely, however I would like to somewhat clean up the leading edge at the garage door. As you'll see in the photo the front edge is very unven and has a couple gaps that actually exist on both sides of the door allowing for easy access to creatures. I would like to fix this up both for function and to look a little nicer. My hope was to run a 2x4 across the front to make a straight edge frame and then fill in the space. Can this be done or will it never work to secure to existing concrete? I have never done concrete work beyond some hydraulic cement hole patches so I don't honestly know if this can be done or not. What is the best approach to this and product to use?

Thanks!
 

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