Clay quarry tiles as doorstep?


T

Tim S

Earlier on, I rescued quite a few intact quarry tiles (1950's) from a floor:

http://photos.dionic.net/v/public/bungalow/2008-11-22-img_0003.jpg.html

They're about 9x9" and 1.5" thick, clay.

I'm thinking of cleaning them up and using them as a new back doorstep.

One layer will sit across the inner and outer leaves of the cavity wall in
the doorway, becoming the door threshold step.

I don't see much point in putting a DPC below them as it will hinder me
trying to get them to stay down - better in this respect to mortar them
directly to the bricks so they don't fall off.

Being solid clay I don't see a problem with them tracking damp from one side
to the other, especially as they will be installed at the normal DPC
height, not above any existing DPC.

Anyone see why this would be a bad idea?

If so, anyone got a method of fixing them with a DPC so they won't fall off?

Ta

Tim
 
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T

The Natural Philosopher

Tim said:
Earlier on, I rescued quite a few intact quarry tiles (1950's) from a floor:

http://photos.dionic.net/v/public/bungalow/2008-11-22-img_0003.jpg.html

They're about 9x9" and 1.5" thick, clay.

I'm thinking of cleaning them up and using them as a new back doorstep.

One layer will sit across the inner and outer leaves of the cavity wall in
the doorway, becoming the door threshold step.

I don't see much point in putting a DPC below them as it will hinder me
trying to get them to stay down - better in this respect to mortar them
directly to the bricks so they don't fall off.

Being solid clay I don't see a problem with them tracking damp from one side
to the other, especially as they will be installed at the normal DPC
height, not above any existing DPC.

Anyone see why this would be a bad idea?

If so, anyone got a method of fixing them with a DPC so they won't fall off?
Well if they are glazed, OK, but unglazed quarries are deeply hyrgoscopic..

Nothing says uyou have to use plastic as a DPPC..what about some slates,
and some mortarloaded with whatever it is..PVA?? to make it waterproof?

Because concrete is waterproof, if made right. By and large the lack of
waterproofness in mortars is down to low cement content, leading to
porosity. Increase cement content and add something to sit in the
micropores, and it should be juts fine by itself. But a BCO would like
to see some slates as well I think.
 
B

Bob Minchin

The said:
Well if they are glazed, OK, but unglazed quarries are deeply hyrgoscopic..

Nothing says uyou have to use plastic as a DPPC..what about some slates,
and some mortarloaded with whatever it is..PVA?? to make it waterproof?

Because concrete is waterproof, if made right. By and large the lack of
waterproofness in mortars is down to low cement content, leading to
porosity. Increase cement content and add something to sit in the
micropores, and it should be juts fine by itself. But a BCO would like
to see some slates as well I think.
If these tiles are the door threshold, how to you propose to stop rain
being driven under the door?
You could set a weather bar into the tiles but keeping that securely in
place might be a problem.
I thought it was normal to have the interior floor covering the inner
skin , any steps on the outer skin and an proper sill bridging the
cavity. The lst few external doors I've put in, I've built the frame
myself and router a 1/4" groove in the sill and set in a strip of
stainless steel to form the weather bar.

In your case maybe a length of SS angle screwed into the base and quarry
tiles either side?

Bob
 
T

Tim S

Bob Minchin coughed up some electrons that declared:
If these tiles are the door threshold, how to you propose to stop rain
being driven under the door?
That's a very good question...

You could set a weather bar into the tiles but keeping that securely in
place might be a problem.
I thought it was normal to have the interior floor covering the inner
skin , any steps on the outer skin and an proper sill bridging the
cavity.
Fiddly - can't see how to do it... The internal floor is level with the
bricks (about 2 courses over the foundation). I don't have a lot of height
to play with. Weather bar on the door would help too...
The lst few external doors I've put in, I've built the frame
myself and router a 1/4" groove in the sill and set in a strip of
stainless steel to form the weather bar.
That's a good idea. I was trying to avoid wood.

Angle grinder! Seriously - I could run a fine slot along the top of the
tiles, about 1/4 deep and do the same - epoxy a strip of SS in... Would
brass strip do (easier to get)?
In your case maybe a length of SS angle screwed into the base and quarry
tiles either side?
I can see how that would work.

Cheers

Tim
 
T

Tim S

The Natural Philosopher coughed up some electrons that declared:

Well if they are glazed, OK, but unglazed quarries are deeply
hyrgoscopic..
OK - not sure, mine do appear to have a satin/shiny surface so I guess they
must be glazed...
Nothing says uyou have to use plastic as a DPPC..what about some slates,
and some mortarloaded with whatever it is..PVA?? to make it waterproof?

Because concrete is waterproof, if made right. By and large the lack of
waterproofness in mortars is down to low cement content, leading to
porosity. Increase cement content and add something to sit in the
micropores, and it should be juts fine by itself. But a BCO would like
to see some slates as well I think.
Thanks - all good ideas. Hadn't thought of slate. Also, I can make a
waterproof SBR mix mortar (still have some left from the screeding).

BCO won't care what I do, so I'm looking for "good enough" ideas :)

Cheers

Tim
 
S

Stuart Noble

Bob said:
If these tiles are the door threshold, how to you propose to stop rain
being driven under the door?
You could set a weather bar into the tiles but keeping that securely in
place might be a problem.
I thought it was normal to have the interior floor covering the inner
skin , any steps on the outer skin and an proper sill bridging the
cavity. The lst few external doors I've put in, I've built the frame
myself and router a 1/4" groove in the sill and set in a strip of
stainless steel to form the weather bar.

In your case maybe a length of SS angle screwed into the base and quarry
tiles either side?

Bob
There seems to be some innovative thresholds around now to cope with
wheelchair access. Might be possible to set this into the tiles somehow.
What I can't find is a pvc or white aluminium weather bar (the type that
is just fixed to the door).
 
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B

Bob Minchin

Tim said:
Bob Minchin coughed up some electrons that declared:


That's a very good question...



Fiddly - can't see how to do it... The internal floor is level with the
bricks (about 2 courses over the foundation). I don't have a lot of height
to play with. Weather bar on the door would help too...


That's a good idea. I was trying to avoid wood.

Angle grinder! Seriously - I could run a fine slot along the top of the
tiles, about 1/4 deep and do the same - epoxy a strip of SS in... Would
brass strip do (easier to get)?


I can see how that would work.

Cheers

Tim
Brass might go a bit greenish in time but would work. I get my
stainless strip from Metalsupermarket - just depends if you have one
near you or otherwise a sympathetic non ferrous metal stock holder who
will cut you a bit off a 4-6m length.

For some reason metalsupermarket.com is misbehaving at the moment and
re-directing to UK2 web hosting???

Bob
 
T

Tim S

Dave Plowman (News) coughed up some electrons that declared:
I got them in a large B&Q. They are aluminium with a rubber blade. Fitted
to the side of the frame so the door presses on the rubber when closed.
100% effective, in conjunction with the StormGuard - also from B&Q.
Oooh - these look nice:

http://www.toolstation.com/shop/Hardware/Draught+Excluders/Weather+Bar+Kit+914mm+Aluminium/d170/sd2802/p97070


I can see that working quite well and no angle grinder (shame).

Thanks for the tipoff.

Tim
 
T

The Natural Philosopher

F said:
Sorry to butt in on this but if the rain comes down hard and from a
particular direction it somehow finds a way past the weather bar and
under one of our doors, or down the sides of the frame and then under.
I'm not sure which. So, could you point me in the direction of the
'seals' you refer to please.
Porch is what you want then.

OR a really good anti-draught door seal with the equvalent of car door
rubbber seals.
 
P

Phil L

Tim said:
Earlier on, I rescued quite a few intact quarry tiles (1950's) from a
floor:

http://photos.dionic.net/v/public/bungalow/2008-11-22-img_0003.jpg.html

They're about 9x9" and 1.5" thick, clay.

I'm thinking of cleaning them up and using them as a new back
doorstep.

One layer will sit across the inner and outer leaves of the cavity
wall in the doorway, becoming the door threshold step.

I don't see much point in putting a DPC below them as it will hinder
me trying to get them to stay down - better in this respect to mortar
them directly to the bricks so they don't fall off.

Being solid clay I don't see a problem with them tracking damp from
one side to the other, especially as they will be installed at the
normal DPC height, not above any existing DPC.

Anyone see why this would be a bad idea?

If so, anyone got a method of fixing them with a DPC so they won't
fall off?
Firstly, they will look terrible as a doorstep as they have square edges -
proper quarry tiles for steps are readilly available and they have rounded
edged ones and also double rounded edged ones for the sides, they are
available from any decent tile outlet and they are quite cheap.

Secondly, I can't imagine what possible use a DPC would be under tiles -
what's the worst that could happen? - yes, that's right - the tiles get wet,
but considering they are open to the elelments on top, it's irrelevant.

Neat PVA the entire area to be covered, then mix sand/cement @ 2:1 and use
as tile adhesive and grout.
You can dab a blob of neat PVA to the back of each tile prior to
laying....when all done and grouted, wash over with damp sponge so that no
visible chunks of mortar are present.
The following day it will dry white, so give a light wipe over with boiled
linseed oil on a rag.


HTH
 
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T

Tim S

Phil L coughed up some electrons that declared:
Firstly, they will look terrible as a doorstep as they have square edges -
proper quarry tiles for steps are readilly available and they have rounded
edged ones and also double rounded edged ones for the sides, they are
available from any decent tile outlet and they are quite cheap.
This is valid. Just trying to be green and reuse some materials... It's is
true that the tiles on the front step are faced off with a soldier course
in brick.
Secondly, I can't imagine what possible use a DPC would be under tiles -
what's the worst that could happen? - yes, that's right - the tiles get
wet, but considering they are open to the elelments on top, it's
irrelevant.
I was worried in the reverse direction - taking damp into the inner leaf.
Neat PVA the entire area to be covered, then mix sand/cement @ 2:1 and use
as tile adhesive and grout.
You can dab a blob of neat PVA to the back of each tile prior to
laying....when all done and grouted, wash over with damp sponge so that no
visible chunks of mortar are present.
The following day it will dry white, so give a light wipe over with boiled
linseed oil on a rag.
That's very useful - I didn't know about the linseed oil trick. Thanks!
 

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