Ceiling Fan: Where the capacitor goes....


A

Alchaemist

Hi there....

I was trying to assemble an old ceiling fan... but... I wasn't sure
where the capacitor goes..
I am a technician, so I tried to figure out how it should go in
theory... but obviously I would have prefered to find something
confirming this on the internet before turning the switch on.... you
know... better not to burn out things....
After some research in the internet I found NOTHING about where the
capacitor goes in standard ceiling fans...

Well, after measuring the 3 cables, I found that there were as
expected two coils with one wire in common.

______ __________
) (
( )
COIL 1 ) ( COIL 2
STATIC( ) MOVABLE
) (
--------
|
|

So... how do you connect that?
Well according to the theory... if you apply voltage to one coil, it
will create an alternating magnetic field according to the alternating
current. Now... if we want this thing to move, we must feed the second
coild with another alternating current to generate another magenetic
field with DIFFERENT PHASE...
How to achieve this? well, here is where the capacitor comes...
If we connect the capacitor in series with the second coil... there
we will have the difference in phase...
Of course that the capacitor must have the right capacitance
according to the inductance that the coil has.

The diagram should be like this.

LIVE _______________________________
\ \ CAPACITOR
| __|__
| _____
| |
|______ __________|
) (
( )
COIL 1 ) ( COIL 2
STATIC( ) MOVABLE
) (
--------
|
|
NEUTRAL _______________/

Why to post this? Well... Everything should be in Internet, right?
;)
Regards you all!
Alchaemist
 
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T

Terry

Alchaemist said:
Hi there....

I was trying to assemble an old ceiling fan... but... I wasn't sure
where the capacitor goes..
I am a technician, so I tried to figure out how it should go in
theory... but obviously I would have prefered to find something
confirming this on the internet before turning the switch on.... you
know... better not to burn out things....
After some research in the internet I found NOTHING about where the
capacitor goes in standard ceiling fans...

Well, after measuring the 3 cables, I found that there were as
expected two coils with one wire in common.

______ __________
) (
( )
COIL 1 ) ( COIL 2
STATIC( ) MOVABLE
) (
--------
|
|

So... how do you connect that?
Well according to the theory... if you apply voltage to one coil, it
will create an alternating magnetic field according to the alternating
current. Now... if we want this thing to move, we must feed the second
coild with another alternating current to generate another magenetic
field with DIFFERENT PHASE...
How to achieve this? well, here is where the capacitor comes...
If we connect the capacitor in series with the second coil... there
we will have the difference in phase...
Of course that the capacitor must have the right capacitance
according to the inductance that the coil has.

The diagram should be like this.

LIVE _______________________________
\ \ CAPACITOR
| __|__
| _____
| |
|______ __________|
) (
( )
COIL 1 ) ( COIL 2
STATIC( ) MOVABLE
) (
--------
|
|
NEUTRAL _______________/

Why to post this? Well... Everything should be in Internet, right?
;)
Regards you all!
Alchaemist
Agree exactly: Was given a fan by someone who said it wouldn't
work unless you started it spinning by hand and even then it was
very 'weak'! It has two separate windings (four wires). We did
exactly what is described above by Alchaemist.
We put a capacitor in series with one winding, the one with the
higher resistance, and connected that and the 'main' winding
across the 115 volt 60 hertz supply.
The fan mounted on a plywood board sized to fit both basement
windows and/or the vent for the attic roof space has worked that
way for some 20+ years.
Suggest that "feed the second winding (coil) with an alternating
current that IS OUT OF PHASE ..... " would also be suitable
wording; but the principle involved is well described by the
poster IMHO.
Terry.
 

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