Carpeting Over Concrete


D

Dan O'Connor

I want to install a carpet over the concrete (floors and walls) in my
basement in my new house. I want a very durable stain resistant cheap
carpet... not a luxurious one, but just a very thin/hard one. I'd rather
not have an indoor/outdoor carpet, but will get one if that is what is
required. So I have a few questions: Do I want nylon or olefin or something
else? What will resist moisture the best? What will resist water damage
the best incase some water leaks into the basement through the walls? What
will do this for the cheapest? CAN I put carpet directly over concrete
floors and walls? If so, how? Just glue it on?

If anybody could answer any of these questions, I'd greatly appreciate it.
 
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R

Ralph

I want to install a carpet over the concrete (floors and walls) in my
basement in my new house. I want a very durable stain resistant cheap
carpet... not a luxurious one, but just a very thin/hard one. I'd rather
not have an indoor/outdoor carpet, but will get one if that is what is
required. So I have a few questions: Do I want nylon or olefin or something
else? What will resist moisture the best? What will resist water damage
the best incase some water leaks into the basement through the walls? What
will do this for the cheapest? CAN I put carpet directly over concrete
floors and walls? If so, how? Just glue it on?

If anybody could answer any of these questions, I'd greatly appreciate it.
Berber works well over concrete without a pad. You don't have to glue it - it
will lay out by itself - unless you're playing Jai Alai or something.

If you have water leaks I can't imagine any kind of carpet working well - mold
will collect on anything you put down.

Ralph
 
R

Rufio

Have you considered any other sort of covering ?

I'm planning a basement for my new home - what I'm looking for is something
like the a urethane coating, that's used on garage floor (only a better
version ?)
 
D

Dan O'Connor

Yeah that would be good... I think I'm going to ask the guy at Home Depot
about it and see how much he knows.
 
R

Ralph Hertle

Dan O'Connor wrote:

Make a test of the water content of the concrete. Concrete can appear
dry, even dusty, and be dry to the touch, and it may still have a lot of
water in it. The water rises to the surface where it immediately evaporates.

Place an impermeable layer over the concrete. i.e., 1 to 6 mil PE, and
you will soon see moisture beneath it. Place 2-3 layers of corrugated
cartons under the PE film, and if there is water the cardboard will soon
be soggy. Let that test continue until failure occurs. If it stays dry
you're in luck.

Some remedies:
Install a sump pump to drain the gravel beneath the slab. A cored hole
in the slab will also permit the discovery of a water barrier membrane
beneath the slab if that exists.
Seal the floor with a good grade of exterior masonry porch paint (which,
by the way is a good renewable flooring surface (and a cool battleship
gray looks really good.) A good grade of garage floor paint is an
option. (Rustoleum. I think, is one brand.)
Install a dehumidifier, and possibly also a heat exchanger.
Weep tube drains, and also wicking may be used to carry away any water
that gets through the exterior wall and beneath the GWB.
Nylon carpet fiber lasts far longer than polyolefin, especially because
it doesn't oxidize quite as rapidly. Nylon is also better for abrasion
resistance.
A porous type of padding may enable water to evaporate rather than be
retained beneath the carpet. Or no padding.
The use of direct glue down carpet, due to the occlusive nature of the
glue, may reduce water, however, water-based glues may not be a good
idea; it may be better to evaporate the water, and to dehumidify the
air. I'd worry about the steel tack strip rusting out.
Place numerous vents in the GWB, top and bottom of each space between
studs, to keep the insulation dry by means of vapor pressure.
Condensation of water vapor on the cold floor and basement walls is also
a source of water. Seal and insulate the walls, and if there is a lot of
water vapor in the area, i.e., an unvented laundry, use an impermeable
vapor barrier on the inside just beneath the GWB. If there is no source
of water vapor other than the occasional use by the occupants caulk all
possible air infiltration openings to the outside where moisture from
the air will condense.

Ralph Hertle
 
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T

ttumpa1986

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