Burying cables in wall - protection against nails etc.


R

romic

I need to bring cables from upstairs to downstairs to the consumer unit.
Total around 10 T&E in various thicknesses.

The only relatively fool proof part of a wall is where the existing cables
come down and I don't want to remove these until the wiring is complete.

I therefore need to run them down a separate part of the wall - I have a 2
foot space between the kitchen door and the living room door that would be
ideal.. Sods law says that somebody will no doubt bang a nail in the wall
in the future, co I need to give the cables protection.

As I see it, I have the following options:

a) Feed the cables through metal conduits, then plaster over these. The
plaster will have to be a bit deeper than the existing half inch. The
cable from the shower would have to be placed out of conduit at the edge
of the wall.

b) Bury the cables in the plaster as normal, then cover with a sheet of
suitable metal for protection

and that's it! any other suggestions?

Would there be any problems with running a T&E cable (1.00mm and 2.5mm) in
a 10 foot vertical drop without any support?

Thanks

Roger
 
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C

Coherers

I need to bring cables from upstairs to downstairs to the consumer unit.
Total around 10 T&E in various thicknesses.

The only relatively fool proof part of a wall is where the existing cables
come down and I don't want to remove these until the wiring is complete.

I therefore need to run them down a separate part of the wall - I have a 2
foot space between the kitchen door and the living room door that would be
ideal.. Sods law says that somebody will no doubt bang a nail in the wall
in the future, co I need to give the cables protection.

As I see it, I have the following options:

a) Feed the cables through metal conduits, then plaster over these. The
plaster will have to be a bit deeper than the existing half inch. The
cable from the shower would have to be placed out of conduit at the edge
of the wall.

b) Bury the cables in the plaster as normal, then cover with a sheet of
suitable metal for protection

and that's it! any other suggestions?
A simple method is to use metal capping rather than the standard PVC stuff -
this will provide **some** degree of protection. But you must earth the
capping if it is to be any use, as it provides no real mechanical
protection. A nail/screw drill hitting a cable will be earthed by having
passed through, and still being in contact with, the metal layer (with
luck!) thus triggering the protective devices, and hopefully acting as a
better route to earth than the eejit with the hammer/driver/drill ( delete
as applicable).

You should earth-bond your sheets / conduits anyway
Would there be any problems with running a T&E cable (1.00mm and 2.5mm) in
a 10 foot vertical drop without any support?
Maximum spacing for support for vertical PVC cables is between 0.4 and 0.55m
, depending on cable thickness....
 
M

Martin Angove

In message <[email protected]>,
Rick Dipper said:
If its a cavity it might be an idea to run them in the middle.

If its possible that in futur you may want more, it may be work
putting up a thin "fake wall" made of plasterboard .. This is
especially usefull if you have pipes to run as well ....
I like the false-wall idea, but if pipes are included don't forget to
space them as far away from the cables as possible if they are hot, or
else you're going to have to do some derating calculations on the
cables, and possibly even uprate the type of cable if the pipes are
hotter than the 70-odd degrees PVC can withstand.

A false wall might take a picture-nail without affecting the wires, but
anything more substantial is going to be a problem even then.

Hwyl!

M.
 
M

Martin Angove

In message <[email protected]>,
a) Feed the cables through metal conduits, then plaster over these. The
plaster will have to be a bit deeper than the existing half inch. The
cable from the shower would have to be placed out of conduit at the edge
of the wall.
Metal conduit or capping will need to be earthed which can be a bit
awkward to do.
b) Bury the cables in the plaster as normal, then cover with a sheet of
suitable metal for protection

and that's it! any other suggestions?

Would there be any problems with running a T&E cable (1.00mm and 2.5mm) in
a 10 foot vertical drop without any support?
In conduit or capping it shouldn't be a problem. If you are just going
to bury in plaster then you'll need to put in a few cable clips, if only
to keep the cables close enough to the wall to be able to plaster over
them!

Back to the original problem though, if this is a relatively short-term
project and re-using the old route is "best" (as you implied) then is
there any way you can feed the old circuits temporarily by another
route, thus allowing you to bypass the section in question? I'm thinking
of a few carefully worked-out "extension leads", and probably not for
the shower!

Hwyl!

M.
 
R

romic

I need to bring cables from upstairs to downstairs to the consumer
unit. Total around 10 T&E in various thicknesses.

The only relatively fool proof part of a wall is where the existing
cables come down and I don't want to remove these until the wiring is
complete.

I therefore need to run them down a separate part of the wall - I have
a 2 foot space between the kitchen door and the living room door that
would be ideal.. Sods law says that somebody will no doubt bang a nail
in the wall in the future, co I need to give the cables protection.

As I see it, I have the following options:

a) Feed the cables through metal conduits, then plaster over these.
The plaster will have to be a bit deeper than the existing half inch.
The cable from the shower would have to be placed out of conduit at the
edge of the wall.

b) Bury the cables in the plaster as normal, then cover with a sheet
of suitable metal for protection

and that's it! any other suggestions?

Would there be any problems with running a T&E cable (1.00mm and 2.5mm)
in a 10 foot vertical drop without any support?

Thanks

Roger
Thanks for the comments.

It is not a cavity wall, which makes it more difficult. The existing
cables are buried in plaster.

It would seem like the only real option I have is to run the cables down
the existing location. I will need to look into this further and do some
more checking.

In my original post (as above) I mentioned running cables in a 10
foot drop without any vertical support. What I forgot to make clear was,
in this instance, the cables would be in individual conduits and not just
left dangling. Would this make any difference?

Roger
 
S

steve

Thanks for the comments.

It is not a cavity wall, which makes it more difficult. The existing
cables are buried in plaster.

It would seem like the only real option I have is to run the cables down
the existing location. I will need to look into this further and do some
more checking.

In my original post (as above) I mentioned running cables in a 10
foot drop without any vertical support. What I forgot to make clear was,
in this instance, the cables would be in individual conduits and not just
left dangling. Would this make any difference?

Roger
Why not stick ( no nails , hot melt, impact adhesive whatever) DON'T
NAIL OR SCREW IT!!!!! pvc trunking onto the wall over the existing
run. then you can remove the lid and add the cables as you add new
circuits .Then when all cables run , remove the temp plastic trunking
chop out the plaster and remove old cables the put new cables in wall
with plastic or galv steel top hat type protection , doubt you will
get any wide enough to cover all the cables in one go or run in the
conduits remember you can get oval type conduit , round would probably
involve chipping away some of the brick/block to get it flush under
the plaster then plaster/ make good
 
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R

romic

(e-mail address removed) wrote in message


Why not stick ( no nails , hot melt, impact adhesive whatever) DON'T
NAIL OR SCREW IT!!!!! pvc trunking onto the wall over the existing
run. then you can remove the lid and add the cables as you add new
circuits .Then when all cables run , remove the temp plastic trunking
chop out the plaster and remove old cables the put new cables in wall
with plastic or galv steel top hat type protection , doubt you will
get any wide enough to cover all the cables in one go or run in the
conduits remember you can get oval type conduit , round would probably
involve chipping away some of the brick/block to get it flush under
the plaster then plaster/ make good
That might have to be one way of doing it. As I'm doing it a bit at a
time, I would much rather have dove it permanently at a new location,
disconnecting the old cable at the CU then connecting the new one as I go
along. I could then clear out the old stuff at my leisure.

Roger
 
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I need to bring cables from upstairs to downstairs to the consumer unit.
Total around 10 T&E in various thicknesses.

The only relatively fool proof part of a wall is where the existing cables
come down and I don't want to remove these until the wiring is complete.

I therefore need to run them down a separate part of the wall - I have a 2
foot space between the kitchen door and the living room door that would be
ideal.. Sods law says that somebody will no doubt bang a nail in the wall
in the future, co I need to give the cables protection.

As I see it, I have the following options:

a) Feed the cables through metal conduits, then plaster over these. The
plaster will have to be a bit deeper than the existing half inch. The
cable from the shower would have to be placed out of conduit at the edge
of the wall.

b) Bury the cables in the plaster as normal, then cover with a sheet of
suitable metal for protection

and that's it! any other suggestions?

Would there be any problems with running a T&E cable (1.00mm and 2.5mm) in
a 10 foot vertical drop without any support?

Thanks

Roger
Hi Roger,

If I would need to do something like this, I would not try to protect the cables with any metal plate or something, in my opinion it will raise the costs too much, needing really thick metal or so, any other Type of metal might give some sort of protection against nails, but when it comes to drilling it will be kind of useless.
If you decide to put the cables in a new spot I would recommend to use this electrical cable tubing, it will be also easy to make future changes or repairs in case needed.
and as some or someone already said in one of the comments, just advice everyone not to nail, drill etc. on that particular side of the wall.
if really needs to be nails something there, just use a electrical cable detector to be safe, when you do this.

good luck
 

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