Broken office chair


J

Jim

This posting may be a little difficult to present clearly. I
"had" a no-name office chair, at least I did until last Friday
evening. This be a gas strut supported swivel chair that is
height adjustable. Perhaps 10 years old.

While turning slightly I suddenly found myself on the floor. The
top bracket, a box shaped assembly to mate the chair to the gas
strut portion had sheared.

Hate to toss out the chair base/back unit as it is nearly perfect.
Searching online (eBay) for replacement base assemblies show
they run more than just buying a replacement chair.

If anyone here has had similar experiences I'd like to learn some
options.
 
N

notbob

top bracket, a box shaped assembly to mate the chair to the gas
strut portion had sheared.
My killer office chair is headed down that road. I gotta disassemble
it this week to discover what is failing. Right now, the loose
side-to-side slack is increasing and I think something is gonna shear.
I figure a stamped pressed metal post/plate something-or-other that's
going. We'll see.

nb
 
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T

Twayne

Jim said:
This posting may be a little difficult to present clearly. I "had" a
no-name office chair, at least I did until last Friday evening. This be
a gas strut supported swivel chair that is height adjustable. Perhaps 10
years old.

While turning slightly I suddenly found myself on the floor. The top
bracket, a box shaped assembly to mate the chair to the gas strut portion
had sheared.

Hate to toss out the chair base/back unit as it is nearly perfect.
Searching online (eBay) for replacement base assemblies show they run
more than just buying a replacement chair.

If anyone here has had similar experiences I'd like to learn some
options.
Your fat ass needs to lose about 100 lbs.
 
D

DD_BobK

Take it to a muffler shop and have it welded back together. About ten bucks.
Weld repair can be an option but caution must be exercised...... if
the weld repair is in such a location as to heat the gas shock, maybe
not such a good idea.

Mass market chairs are designed for the average plus some small margin
with respect to longevity.
My neighbor came over the his gas shock chair plus the new seat bottom
bracket.

Unfortunately it looked like the gas shock & seat bracket were a press
fit (or thermal fit) assembly with no way to disassemble.
The chair mfr had given him a new bracket but it looks he really
needed the shock / bracket assembly.

His a big guy..... like 6' 4" & pushing 300 lbs.
The chair was only ~ a year old.

cheers
Bob



cheers
Bob
 
E

Earl

Jim said:
This posting may be a little difficult to present clearly. I
"had" a no-name office chair, at least I did until last Friday
evening. This be a gas strut supported swivel chair that is
height adjustable. Perhaps 10 years old.

While turning slightly I suddenly found myself on the floor. The
top bracket, a box shaped assembly to mate the chair to the gas
strut portion had sheared.

Hate to toss out the chair base/back unit as it is nearly perfect.
Searching online (eBay) for replacement base assemblies show
they run more than just buying a replacement chair.

If anyone here has had similar experiences I'd like to learn some
options.
I tossed mine out the front door into a snowbank.
 
S

Stormin Mormon

I'd make some phone calls, under "welding". See if a welding
shop near you can patch that. Also, auto repair garages and
muffler shops often have experienced welders. I have an
office swivel chair that sheared off, and a fellow from auto
repair shop welded it for me. Cost me $20, worth every penny
of that. For the car mechanic, it was a change in the daily
routine.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


This posting may be a little difficult to present clearly.
I
"had" a no-name office chair, at least I did until last
Friday
evening. This be a gas strut supported swivel chair that is
height adjustable. Perhaps 10 years old.

While turning slightly I suddenly found myself on the floor.
The
top bracket, a box shaped assembly to mate the chair to the
gas
strut portion had sheared.

Hate to toss out the chair base/back unit as it is nearly
perfect.
Searching online (eBay) for replacement base assemblies
show
they run more than just buying a replacement chair.

If anyone here has had similar experiences I'd like to learn
some
options.
 
S

Stormin Mormon

Mine was twenty. Man, stuff is expnsive in NYS.

--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
..


If anyone here has had similar experiences I'd like to
learn some
options.
Take it to a muffler shop and have it welded back together.
About ten bucks.
 
C

clare

Ya get what ya pay for- there is a reason the big-boxes sell 'office
chairs' for $79-$200 dollars, and traditional commercial furniture
stores sell them for 3x to 5x that price.

Not saying the commercial-grade ones are not overpriced, mind you, just
that it is hard or impossible to find durable ones at a mass-market store.
I've found EXACTLY the same chair at two different "office supply"
places - one at half the price of the other - so that is not always
true.
Same part numbers on the chair parts - one had a "big box" office
supply name on it, the other in a plain box at a "real" office
furniture store. The "big box" name was half the price but you needed
to assemble it yourself (a five minute job) while the "real office
supply store" assembled it for you (but the one on display had screws
improperly assembled etc).

Now perhaps it was not a "durable" chair -by some definition, which
would make it overpriced at one store - perhaps it WAS a durable chair
- which made it one heck of a deal at the other store.
 
L

larry moe 'n curly

Jim said:
While turning slightly I suddenly found myself on the floor. The
top bracket, a box shaped assembly to mate the chair to the gas
strut portion had sheared.
The exact same thing happened to my chair, only I caught it before it
collapsed. There was a 1-2" crack from one edge to a 1/2" hole. How
can thick steel like that crack on a chair when wood holds up fine?
 
R

Robert Green

I generally buy mine at auctions or garage sales. and try to keep 1-2
spares on hand, for when the main one gets wobbly. Stand facing chair
place one hand on each arm rest, and rock side to side. If you can feel
slop, move on.
We've got a used office furniture warehouse here in DC that's been crammed
to the gills lately as businesses all over town close up shop. I picked up
a high back desk chair with what look like real walnut arms for $10 (it had
some muck on the seat I had to clean off with solvent) and 3 legal Fireking
2 drawer file cabinets for $75 each. Getting them up the stairs was quite a
chore (they only do curbside or loading dock delivery). I used a handtruck
and an electric winch and a friend and it still was nearly impossible.
They're lined with concrete. I've been able to keep my favorite office
chair alive through two base transplants. Chairs take an awful lot of
repetitive stress at the post & plate.

This is a good reminder to check all the plates for wear. You can break
your neck if it fails in precisely the wrong way. Fortunately, the two
times it's happened to me it was just a nasty surprise.
 
C

clare

A combination of things: Poor welding, poor design, poor load distribution,
poor triangulation and bracing, and the poor chair that has to hold up some
fat ass who thinks it's a recliner.

BTW, most of the metal is .065" thick.

Steve
Wood does not fatigue when it bends. Metal does. Steel can flex more
than aluminum before it cracks - unless it is hard (work hardened) to
start with. Cold stamped steel is work hardened and rather brittle
-particularly no-spec recycled chinese scrap.
 
J

Jim

We've got a used office furniture warehouse here in DC that's been crammed
to the gills lately as businesses all over town close up shop. I picked up
a high back desk chair with what look like real walnut arms for $10 (it had
some muck on the seat I had to clean off with solvent) and 3 legal Fireking
2 drawer file cabinets for $75 each. Getting them up the stairs was quite a
chore (they only do curbside or loading dock delivery). I used a handtruck
and an electric winch and a friend and it still was nearly impossible.
They're lined with concrete. I've been able to keep my favorite office
chair alive through two base transplants. Chairs take an awful lot of
repetitive stress at the post& plate.

This is a good reminder to check all the plates for wear. You can break
your neck if it fails in precisely the wrong way. Fortunately, the two
times it's happened to me it was just a nasty surprise.
Got the base welded back together today. Will delegate it as a
spare part time use chair from now on.
 
N

Nate Nagel

We've got a used office furniture warehouse here in DC that's been crammed
to the gills lately as businesses all over town close up shop. I picked up
a high back desk chair with what look like real walnut arms for $10 (it had
some muck on the seat I had to clean off with solvent) and 3 legal Fireking
2 drawer file cabinets for $75 each. Getting them up the stairs was quite a
chore (they only do curbside or loading dock delivery). I used a handtruck
and an electric winch and a friend and it still was nearly impossible.
They're lined with concrete. I've been able to keep my favorite office
chair alive through two base transplants. Chairs take an awful lot of
repetitive stress at the post& plate.

This is a good reminder to check all the plates for wear. You can break
your neck if it fails in precisely the wrong way. Fortunately, the two
times it's happened to me it was just a nasty surprise.
Care to tell a brother the name of the place? I could really use a new
office chair, but the company that I work for is too damn cheap to buy a
good one. It'd be worth it for me to drive the pickemup truck into the
city if I could be assured of finding something decent.

nate
 
V

vjp2.at

I fixed an armless office chair whose seat and back had worn out. I used two
slabs of wood for the seat and back, and had the edges rounded. THen I got a
"Windsor Chair Seat Cover" (covers back and seat) to cover up the wood.


- = -
Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist
http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm
---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}---
[Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards]
[Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
 
R

Robert Green

Nate Nagel said:
Care to tell a brother the name of the place? I could really use a new
office chair, but the company that I work for is too damn cheap to buy a
good one. It'd be worth it for me to drive the pickemup truck into the
city if I could be assured of finding something decent.
I had to look it up since I know where it is on sight (on the way back to my
house from the Pentagon, which is how I chanced on it in the first place!)
but not by address other than New York Ave.

Washington Used Office Furniture
1100 New York Ave NW, Washington, DC 20005
(202) 223-9241

Be advised that like all other "good deal" places the best deals occur at
random - which is why I would stop off once every week or two to see what
new loads of stuff they got it. They seriously mark down stuff that's been
around too long when new loads come in and with lousy economy, that seems to
be pretty frequently. On the other hand, I've been there when nothing
seemed like an exceptional deal but it's the place to go if you've got your
own truck. BTW, the three Firekings were in perfect shape, and even came
with a double set of keys for two of the three (the third had only one key).
I was so astounded by the deal I got worried they contained asbestos, but
the manufacturer says it's cement and so does my back! They're made of
seriously thick steel, not like the typical sheet metal junk. Good hunting!
 
N

Nate Nagel

I had to look it up since I know where it is on sight (on the way back to my
house from the Pentagon, which is how I chanced on it in the first place!)
but not by address other than New York Ave.

Washington Used Office Furniture
1100 New York Ave NW, Washington, DC 20005
(202) 223-9241

Be advised that like all other "good deal" places the best deals occur at
random - which is why I would stop off once every week or two to see what
new loads of stuff they got it. They seriously mark down stuff that's been
around too long when new loads come in and with lousy economy, that seems to
be pretty frequently. On the other hand, I've been there when nothing
seemed like an exceptional deal but it's the place to go if you've got your
own truck. BTW, the three Firekings were in perfect shape, and even came
with a double set of keys for two of the three (the third had only one key).
I was so astounded by the deal I got worried they contained asbestos, but
the manufacturer says it's cement and so does my back! They're made of
seriously thick steel, not like the typical sheet metal junk. Good hunting!
Thanks, I'll have to remember that. If I ever have free time.
Hopefully they are open on Saturdays otherwise I'll never be able to
make it there though unless I conveniently have to visit a job site in
the city... (but that would be wrong)

nate
 
T

The Daring Dufas

This posting may be a little difficult to present clearly. I "had" a
no-name office chair, at least I did until last Friday evening. This be
a gas strut supported swivel chair that is height adjustable. Perhaps 10
years old.

While turning slightly I suddenly found myself on the floor. The top
bracket, a box shaped assembly to mate the chair to the gas strut
portion had sheared.

Hate to toss out the chair base/back unit as it is nearly perfect.
Searching online (eBay) for replacement base assemblies show they run
more than just buying a replacement chair.

If anyone here has had similar experiences I'd like to learn some options.
I would suggest going to a used office furniture dealer and getting a
name brand used office chair for the price of a new Chicom chair and
it will last for many years. With all the businesses that have closed
down, there should be some very nice slightly used office furniture
at the dealers. You may have to scrape the "Solar Energy Rules" stickers
off the back of the chair but you can't beat the price and quality. ^_^

TDD
 
R

Robert Green

Nate Nagel said:
Thanks, I'll have to remember that. If I ever have free time.
Hopefully they are open on Saturdays otherwise I'll never be able to
make it there though unless I conveniently have to visit a job site in
the city... (but that would be wrong)
Just be warned. Like Goodwill, the good stuff goes fast. The friend that
helped me winch the Firekings into my house went down the next day to buy
the remaining units for himself but they were long gone. They are beautiful
pieces with incredibly sturdy but easy gliding slide mechanisms. Only
problem is they weight about 500 pounds each.

Hmm, I might just take a spin down there next week. Now I have a
handicapped van that "kneels" and has a ramp that folds down. Great for
carrying heavy cargo like fire-proof file cabinets. The National Arborteum
is just a short distance away. Make a weekend trip out of it. IIRC, they
are open on Saturdays but I'd call first just to make sure. There's also a
cheap motel nearby that has served as HQ for a number of serious criminal
enterprises, so don't look like a tourist. It IS Washington, DC where only
criminals carry handguns.
 
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T

The Daring Dufas

A combination of things: Poor welding, poor design, poor load distribution,
poor triangulation and bracing, and the poor chair that has to hold up some
fat ass who thinks it's a recliner.

BTW, most of the metal is .065" thick.

Steve
Chinese don't have big butts. ^_^

TDD
 

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