Blue water from immersion tank


D

Dave Baker

I drained the above last week to fit an immersion heater. Ran a hose from
the drain cock into the bath and then went back upstairs while it drained.
When I went back to the bathroom the last of the tank's liquid lying in the
bath and still dripping out of the hose was a bright almost flourescent
electric blue. I'm red/green colourblind though so it could also have been a
light mauve or purple for all I'd know but it was a very attractive and
striking colour whatever it was. However it's not necessarily what I want in
the hot water that ends up in my baths and sink.

If you go here

http://gotomy.com/color.html

It was something like FF66FF on the far right hand side about half way down.

The tank's only been in place for about 3 years. Clearly something is
corroding or reacting with something else but there was nothing like this
when I drained the old tank which had been there for eons.

Anyone seen this phenomenon before?
 
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A

Adrian

HI Dave

I drained the above last week to fit an immersion heater. Ran a hose from
the drain cock into the bath and then went back upstairs while it drained.
When I went back to the bathroom the last of the tank's liquid lying in the
bath and still dripping out of the hose was a bright almost flourescent
electric blue. I'm red/green colourblind though so it could also have been a
light mauve or purple for all I'd know but it was a very attractive and
striking colour whatever it was. However it's not necessarily what I want in
the hot water that ends up in my baths and sink.

If you go here

http://gotomy.com/color.html

It was something like FF66FF on the far right hand side about half way down.

The tank's only been in place for about 3 years. Clearly something is
corroding or reacting with something else but there was nothing like this
when I drained the old tank which had been there for eons.

Anyone seen this phenomenon before?
Yes !

Not sure if it's a great help, other than to let you know that you're
not alone <g>

In our new build out here in the far South-West of Ireland, we get
this 'blue water' effect, particularly with the hot water.

It's sort-of-turquoise in the bath, and the colour becomes much more
pronounced when there's soap in the bath.

Our water comes from a deep bore well, as is common out here in the
wilds <g>.

We have a man doing an water analysis on the water at the moment. His
preliminary comment was that the water could be quite acidic, and
might be reacting with the copper hot water cylinder..... won't know
for certain about the water analysis until after the New Year.

I do know that the water is very soft - round about the 'bottom of the
scale' on the Screwfix water hardness tester.

So - not much help - but at least you're not alone !<G>

Adrian
 
B

bob watkinson

Dave said:
I drained the above last week to fit an immersion heater. Ran a hose from
the drain cock into the bath and then went back upstairs while it drained.
When I went back to the bathroom the last of the tank's liquid lying in the
bath and still dripping out of the hose was a bright almost flourescent
electric blue. I'm red/green colourblind though so it could also have been a
light mauve or purple for all I'd know but it was a very attractive and
striking colour whatever it was. However it's not necessarily what I want in
the hot water that ends up in my baths and sink.

If you go here

http://gotomy.com/color.html

It was something like FF66FF on the far right hand side about half way down.

The tank's only been in place for about 3 years. Clearly something is
corroding or reacting with something else but there was nothing like this
when I drained the old tank which had been there for eons.

Anyone seen this phenomenon before?
--
Dave Baker
Puma Race Engines
www.pumaracing.co.uk
Camp USA engineer minces about for high performance specialist (4,4,7)
Can't help too much either though I can confirm you are most definitely
colour blind ;-)
 
S

Suz

Dave Baker said:
I drained the above last week to fit an immersion heater. Ran a hose from
the drain cock into the bath and then went back upstairs while it drained.
When I went back to the bathroom the last of the tank's liquid lying in
the
bath and still dripping out of the hose was a bright almost flourescent
electric blue. I'm red/green colourblind though so it could also have been
a
light mauve or purple for all I'd know but it was a very attractive and
striking colour whatever it was.
I have a friend who is colour blind and insists he sees colour - just can't
identify it. He is completely colour blind and if you haven't seen colour
how do you know what you are missing?

Has someone told you it is blue or are you guessing? The colour you linked
to is pink.
 
M

meow2222

I have a friend who is colour blind and insists he sees colour - just can't
identify it. He is completely colour blind and if you haven't seen colour
how do you know what you are missing?

Has someone told you it is blue or are you guessing? The colour you linked
to is pink.
Well, maybe he really has pink water. As to what couud cause that....
some unnatural phenomenon would be my guess.

Anyway I get the feeling that tank wont last very well. Perhaps putting
some limestone chips in the bottom could help it?


NT
 
K

Keyser Sose

Could it be copper sulphate perhaps? I remember at school it was a bluish
colour. Then again, I was at school 30 years ago so forgive my chemistry
lecture!!!
Steve
 
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O

Osprey

Dave said:
I drained the above last week to fit an immersion heater. Ran a hose from
the drain cock into the bath and then went back upstairs while it drained.
When I went back to the bathroom the last of the tank's liquid lying in the
bath and still dripping out of the hose was a bright almost flourescent
electric blue. I'm red/green colourblind though so it could also have been a
light mauve or purple for all I'd know but it was a very attractive and
striking colour whatever it was. However it's not necessarily what I want in
the hot water that ends up in my baths and sink.

If you go here

http://gotomy.com/color.html

It was something like FF66FF on the far right hand side about half way down.

The tank's only been in place for about 3 years. Clearly something is
corroding or reacting with something else but there was nothing like this
when I drained the old tank which had been there for eons.

Anyone seen this phenomenon before?
--
Dave Baker
Puma Race Engines
www.pumaracing.co.uk
Camp USA engineer minces about for high performance specialist (4,4,7)


Looked at FF66FF and if your bathwater is that colour ... do you have a
Nuclear reprocessing facility nearby ?

Have you looked to see if you glow in the dark, do your children have
extra fingers & toes ?

No idea what would cause this - but wouldn't want to bathe in it.
 
S

shaneandmich1

hw cylinders sometimes have a sacraficial annode built in to let you
know that it is coming to the end of its life span (so they say) this
causes green/blue coloured water, it can also be caused by scale at the
bottom of your cylinder especially if you live in a hard water area.
shane
 
K

kimble

Suz said:
I have a friend who is colour blind and insists he sees colour - just can't
identify it. He is completely colour blind and if you haven't seen colour
how do you know what you are missing?
Not all colourblindnesses are equal. The eye is normally sensitive to
three different wavelengths; red, green and blue. Most forms of
colourblindness involve, for example, a deficient green receptor that
responds to red light, leaving you unable to differentiate red and
green, but still knowing the difference between red/green and blue, and
indeed red/green and black.

Total colourblindness is a result of two anomalous receptors, leaving
you with true monochromatic vision, typically sensitive somewhere in the
blue region. This is extremely rare.

Has someone told you it is blue or are you guessing? The colour you linked
to is pink.
To someone with a red deficiency, pink appears to be blue. Colourblind
people tend to use common sense to fill in the gaps. The sky is blue,
the grass is green, skin is pink (yes, even though it looks pale green)
etc. This works until the sky is pink, which will go unnoticed, or the
grass dies, at which point you know that dead-looking grass is brown,
even though you're still perceiving it as roughly the same shade of
poo-colour.

We also tend to make greater use of contrast when perceiving differences
between shades. For example, being red-deficient, I cannot tell the
difference between green and all but the most saturated yellows - I see
them all as a normal person sees green. However, when you're a small
child, they show you a cartoonish picture, and teach you that green is
the medium-green of grass, and that yellow is the bright yellow of the
sun. So I learned that medium greens were called 'green' and light
greens were called 'yellow', and as a result, 90% of the time, I
appeared to correctly differentiate green and yellow.

That the OP described FF66FF as blue suggests that they have a red
deficiency, and a poor understanding of RGB colour mixing :)

That they described the water as blue tells you nothing more than it is
going to be somewhere on the (presumably) blue-pink-purple spectrum.
That they chose 'blue' vs 'pink' to describe it means nothing (other
than perhaps they come across more blue things that look
blue/pink/purple than pink or purple things that look blue/pink/purple).


Kim.
 
T

Terry

kimble said:
Not all colourblindnesses are equal. The eye is normally sensitive to
three different wavelengths; red, green and blue. Most forms of
colourblindness involve, for example, a deficient green receptor that
responds to red light, leaving you unable to differentiate red and
green, but still knowing the difference between red/green and blue, and
indeed red/green and black.

Total colourblindness is a result of two anomalous receptors, leaving
you with true monochromatic vision, typically sensitive somewhere in the
blue region. This is extremely rare.



To someone with a red deficiency, pink appears to be blue. Colourblind
people tend to use common sense to fill in the gaps. The sky is blue,
the grass is green, skin is pink (yes, even though it looks pale green)
etc. This works until the sky is pink, which will go unnoticed, or the
grass dies, at which point you know that dead-looking grass is brown,
even though you're still perceiving it as roughly the same shade of
poo-colour.

We also tend to make greater use of contrast when perceiving differences
between shades. For example, being red-deficient, I cannot tell the
difference between green and all but the most saturated yellows - I see
them all as a normal person sees green. However, when you're a small
child, they show you a cartoonish picture, and teach you that green is
the medium-green of grass, and that yellow is the bright yellow of the
sun. So I learned that medium greens were called 'green' and light
greens were called 'yellow', and as a result, 90% of the time, I
appeared to correctly differentiate green and yellow.

That the OP described FF66FF as blue suggests that they have a red
deficiency, and a poor understanding of RGB colour mixing :)

That they described the water as blue tells you nothing more than it is
going to be somewhere on the (presumably) blue-pink-purple spectrum.
That they chose 'blue' vs 'pink' to describe it means nothing (other
than perhaps they come across more blue things that look
blue/pink/purple than pink or purple things that look blue/pink/purple).


Kim.
All this reminds me of our RS rep 40 years ago - I can date it because
the conversation took place just before the introduction of colour tv!

He said that he was colour blind and, although he couldn't identify
colours, he could spot minute differences in hue (I assume from this
that his vision was monochromatic.)

One of his customers was Ford at Dagenham and he walked past the
production lines on his visits. He said he couldn't tell what colour
the cars were but could spot when somebody was going to get a car with
different colour doors to the body! Although the difference was so
slight that many people with normal vision wouldn't see it, he could
spot it instantly.

He then told us of an experiment he took part in during the war. He and
others were taken on a long flight round a number of carefully
camoflaged sites. When they landed, he had successfully spotted ever
single one of them whilst those with normal colour vision saw none!

OT I know, but Kim's explanation rang a few bells!

Terry
 
D

Dave Baker

Stuart said:
down.

Which to the rest of us is a sort of pink colour . That one might look like
blue to you as you see it but of course is nothing like what it ( the water
colour) actually is .if that makes sense . so doesn't tell us what the water
colour actually is .
As I said the water colour may well have been pink, mauve, purple or
anything else with blue in it. All I see is the blue part of the spectrum
because I don't have receptors for the red part, or at least not many of
them. If there's a large enough patch of colour occupying most of my field
of view I can differentiate a lot better but a small area like on that chart
doesn't give me enough to go by. That colour I picked out was about the
right 'brightness' though.

If I'm standing in front of a pillar box it looks bright red. If I'm 100
yards away it just looks 'dark'. Not enough visual cues to go by. I remember
really realising I saw the world differently to other people when I was
walking through a churchyard with my gran one Xmas. She pointed to a holly
bush some way off and said doesn't that look wonderful with all the berries
glowing in it like Xmas tree lights. I couldn't see any sodding berries. The
red berries and green leaves just looked like an amorphous dark mass to me.
Standing next to the bush though I could pick the berries out no problem.

The other thing I remember is being about 7 and finding a red pencil on the
floor in school. I knew I couldn't tell the colour of anything small and red
like that if it was more than a few feet away so I assumed everyone else was
the same. Still holding it in front of me I asked if anyone had lost a
pencil. Someone across the room said yes so I said tell me what colour the
one you lost is to prove it's yours. He looked at it, said red and the whole
class fell about laughing like I was some sort of idiot. I didn't understand
what they were laughing at though and it was years later before I started to
grasp that my eyes just didn't work like theirs.

On the upside my night vision is like an owl's. When the colour cues have
faded away in the dusk all you people with normal vision stumble about like
blind men. I can see my way quite clearly until it's basically pitch black.
I was on holiday with a girlfriend some years ago in Aberystwyth and we went
for a walk after a late Indian meal and ended up in a ruined castle by the
beach. There was a statue with a plaque on it and I stopped to read the
plaque in the moonlight. She turned round and asked what I was doing. I said
I was reading the plaque. She couldn't even see that there were words on it.
Just for once I felt mildly smug about my eyes.

Then on the way home I drove straight through a red traffic light and killed
us both. It's my disembodied spirit typing this. :)

Oh yes, and the thing that really pissed me off the most. I was playing
snooker with a mate and potted one of the best balls of my life. The full
length of the table *and* I screwed back to get perfect position on the
colour. Then he said "you do realise you've just potted the brown not a
red?" Fuckkkkkkkkkkkkk.
 
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D

Dave

Terry said:
kimble wrote:




All this reminds me of our RS rep 40 years ago - I can date it because
the conversation took place just before the introduction of colour tv!

He said that he was colour blind and, although he couldn't identify
colours, he could spot minute differences in hue (I assume from this
that his vision was monochromatic.)

One of his customers was Ford at Dagenham and he walked past the
production lines on his visits. He said he couldn't tell what colour
the cars were but could spot when somebody was going to get a car with
different colour doors to the body! Although the difference was so
slight that many people with normal vision wouldn't see it, he could
spot it instantly.
That reminds me of the time my wife and I were trawling through every
shop that sold wallpaper.
After several weeks we found a pattern that we both agreed on. I went to
get the right number of rolls, only to find that what little stock they
had left consisted of two consecutive batches. My wife and the female
assistants both assured me that the colours were all the same, but I
pointed out that the tiny squares (5 or 6 mm across) were of a slightly
different shade. I was convinced, that by putting one batch on one wall,
I could hide the differences, so we purchased them.

When I got home, I put all the paper onto a table, label side down and
tried to match the two batches. This I did with 100% accuracy.

By the way, I have a slight red/green colour blindness, but excellent
night vision. Are the two connected?

Dave
 
S

Steve

Dave wrote:

By the way, I have a slight red/green colour blindness, but excellent
night vision. Are the two connected?

Dave
I am also red/green colour blind, but, apparently, only slightly.

My night vision is diabolical.

Maybe there is some sort of inverse relationship here.

Steve.
 
D

Dave Baker

Dave said:
By the way, I have a slight red/green colour blindness, but excellent
night vision. Are the two connected?

Dave
See my previous post.
 
K

kimble

Dave said:
By the way, I have a slight red/green colour blindness, but excellent
night vision. Are the two connected?
FWIW, my night vision's somewhat dubious. Night vision is based on a
different set of receptors (rod cells), so I'd have thought it would be
unrelated to colourblindness.


Kim.
 
K

kimble

Terry said:
One of his customers was Ford at Dagenham and he walked past the
production lines on his visits. He said he couldn't tell what colour
the cars were but could spot when somebody was going to get a car with
different colour doors to the body! Although the difference was so
slight that many people with normal vision wouldn't see it, he could
spot it instantly.
OT I know, but Kim's explanation rang a few bells!

Absolutely. I'm forever amazed at the inability of most people to tell
the difference between black and navy socks. Or indeed the various
shades of black/navy that socks go after an unequal number of washes.

Similarly, many years ago, I accompanied my (adoptive - they have normal
colour vision) parents on a safari in Zimbabwe. The thing about the
African bush, when you're colourblind, is that *everything* is a shade
of poo-colour. After much frustration at failing to spot the various
wildlife[1] moving through patchy undergrowth that was pointed out to
me, I eventually realised that I could see more clearly if I looked
through the B&W CRT viewfinder of the camcorder I was carrying. The
substitution of greyscale for pooscale made little difference to me, but
the increased (and indeed, controllable) contrast made things much easier.

Conversely, my father found the camcorder frustrating for exactly the
opposite reason: the loss of colour meant that spotting brown animals
against green undergrowth was much harder.


Kim.
--
[1] Not to mention birds. In my universe, birds are small, dark objects
that sit in trees (and are therefore usually backlight by a bright sky).
Since small objects have no colour, unmagnified they all look pretty
much the same. It seems that my ability to perceive colour in
arbitrarily small objects is almost non-existent, even for colours which
I would otherwise be able to see. This confuses people, and leads to my
rational hatred of colour-changing LEDs[2] and traffic lights without a
white reflective border[3].

[2] The typical green-yellow change, on battery chargers and the like, I
can just about see as a change in brightness, but only if I watch it
happen. Arrgh.

[3] Being red-deficient (protanomalous, to use the technical term), I
see primary red as a distinct, but significantly darker colour.
Consequently my issue with traffic lights isn't the obvious
red/yellow/green confusion that people may expect, but that a distant
green light looks no different from a distant white light. Therefore,
although I don't have problems with knowing which colour traffic lights
are on, I occasionally fail to notice, from a distance, that it's a
traffic light and not some other random light source.
 
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N

Nick2

I drained the above last week to fit an immersion heater. Ran a hose from
the drain cock into the bath and then went back upstairs while it drained.
When I went back to the bathroom the last of the tank's liquid lying in
the bath and still dripping out of the hose was a bright almost
flourescent electric blue. I'm red/green colourblind though so it could
also have been a light mauve or purple for all I'd know but it was a very
attractive and striking colour whatever it was. However it's not
necessarily what I want in the hot water that ends up in my baths and
sink.

If you go here

http://gotomy.com/color.html

It was something like FF66FF on the far right hand side about half way
down.
I think what you probably are looking at is 66FFFF (transposing Red &
Green) resulting in something Cyan-ish, indicitave of something
copper-based in your water.
 
O

Owain

kimble said:
Absolutely. I'm forever amazed at the inability of most people to tell
the difference between black and navy socks. Or indeed the various
shades of black/navy that socks go after an unequal number of washes.
I solved this to a large extent by standardising on one particular
pattern of sock, and as I wear them all equally they get washed equally.

Owain
 
R

raden

Nick2 said:
I think what you probably are looking at is 66FFFF (transposing Red &
Green) resulting in something Cyan-ish, indicitave of something
copper-based in your water.
My guess is that someone chucked a toilet Blu in the tank
 
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R

raden

Dave said:
By the way, I have a slight red/green colour blindness, but excellent
night vision. Are the two connected?
Yes - in the brain

That's how you get stereoscopic vision
 

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