Air Conditioners outside drip pipe question


M

Mark Jaggers

Is it normal for water to always be dripping from the outside pipe
that comes out of the attic on our AC?

I do not remember it dripping this much last summer.

Mark
 
B

Bruce

In alt.home.repair
Is it normal for water to always be dripping from the outside pipe
that comes out of the attic on our AC?

I do not remember it dripping this much last summer.
Well, I see an HVAC guy answered with a long detailed condescending answer,
and got it wrong. That pipe is an emergency overflow pipe connected to an
overflow pan under your evaporator. It should have NOTHING dripping from
it ever. When it does, it is because your NORMAL condensate waste system
is clogged.

Look for a pipe on the bottom of your evaporator and follow that to where
it connects to a sewer pipe. Something is clogged causing it to backup and
overflow to the overflow pan. Fix that, the dripping will stop. Pour
bleach in it each spring to kill the gunk and keep it flowing freely.
 
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G

Geoffrey M. Wasteneys

nice now did that hurt
CBHvac said:
Ok...since I have been called an ass, and everything else tonight, including
a fag...lets give some free, not to be taken out of context, advice..


Ok..that condensate drain is there to do what its doing.
Its not there for looks...you know that...right? Ok...
now..
Several factors can affect the amount of condensate from the pipe....most
important...this little thing called humidity.
When you understand that your AC unit does two things...
1- Removes heat from your home, and transfers it outside.
2-Removes humidity and moves it outside in the form of condensate.

Then you can understand that on any given day, depending on humidity, run
time, size of unit, condition of drain, condition of coils, condition of
charge, and such, that you might not get any, or you might get a stream...
I have fired up 4 units in the last 3 days, new installs, that literally
poured water for several hours...and one person called me to ask why it
wasnt gushing like it was yesterday....hummm...could it be its got the
humidity down? Yes...that would be it.
Your units run condition can not really be determined by the amount of
condensate running out the pipe. Weather conditions, air infiltration, and
such will..

As long as you are having the unit serviced correctly, and its removing heat
from your home, do not worry about the amount of water leaving the unit,
unless of course, its stopped and you have a flooded furnace room..
 
G

Geoffrey M. Wasteneys

i would never try to give advice here , only try to get some freindly advice
, and i thought the initial response was great have a great night , please
 
H

HvacTech2

Hi Bruce, hope you are having a nice day

On 14-Jul-03 At About 22:00:47, Bruce wrote to All
Subject: Re: Air Conditioners outside drip pipe question

B> From: (e-mail address removed) (Bruce)

B> In alt.home.repair (e-mail address removed) (Mark Jaggers) wrote:

B> > Is it normal for water to always be dripping from the outside pipe
B> > that comes out of the attic on our AC? > >I do not remember it
B> dripping this much last summer.

B> Well, I see an HVAC guy answered with a long detailed condescending
B> answer, and got it wrong. That pipe is an emergency overflow pipe
B> connected to an overflow pan under your evaporator. It should have
B> NOTHING dripping from it ever. When it does, it is because your
B> NORMAL condensate waste system is clogged.

B> Look for a pipe on the bottom of your evaporator and follow that to
B> where it connects to a sewer pipe. Something is clogged causing it
B> to backup and overflow to the overflow pan. Fix that, the dripping
B> will stop. Pour bleach in it each spring to kill the gunk and keep
B> it flowing freely.

You have it wrong here. run that pipe to a sewer stack and you could get
sewer gas in the house. The pipe he is talking about could be an overflow
safety but since you cannot you nor I can see it there is no way to know.
But saying an experienced tech got it wrong is usually a mistake.



-=> HvacTech2 <=-


... "A friend of mine is in jail for counterfeiting pennies..."- s.w.

___ TagDude 0.92á+[DM]
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
spam protection measure, Please remove the 33 to send e-mail
 
T

TURTLE

Bruce said:
In alt.home.repair


Well, I see an HVAC guy answered with a long detailed condescending answer,
and got it wrong. That pipe is an emergency overflow pipe connected to an
overflow pan under your evaporator. It should have NOTHING dripping from
it ever. When it does, it is because your NORMAL condensate waste system
is clogged.

Look for a pipe on the bottom of your evaporator and follow that to where
it connects to a sewer pipe. Something is clogged causing it to backup and
overflow to the overflow pan. Fix that, the dripping will stop. Pour
bleach in it each spring to kill the gunk and keep it flowing freely.
This is Turtle.

Bruce are you buddys with Mark Jaggers and have been by to take a look at
the system to know if you have a primary drain run to the sewer or exterior
of house? The secondary drain will be usely run to the outside for alarm
reasons.

Am i talking to a installer or service tech by deciding what the system
looks like and never seen it. you are correcting tech and installer which do
this type work everyday and telling them / him how to fix the drain. Damn ,
your good.

If you have really seen the job / system that Mark has , i will tell you
that your right. If you have never seen the job and don't know how the
system is set up. I will say your full of a bunch of hot air.

OH Yea, your fixing to get PLONKED after i get through posting this so save
your band wide for the internet.

TURTLE
 
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C

CBHvac

Ok...since I have been called an ass, and everything else tonight, including
a fag...lets give some free, not to be taken out of context, advice..


Ok..that condensate drain is there to do what its doing.
Its not there for looks...you know that...right? Ok...
now..
Several factors can affect the amount of condensate from the pipe....most
important...this little thing called humidity.
When you understand that your AC unit does two things...
1- Removes heat from your home, and transfers it outside.
2-Removes humidity and moves it outside in the form of condensate.

Then you can understand that on any given day, depending on humidity, run
time, size of unit, condition of drain, condition of coils, condition of
charge, and such, that you might not get any, or you might get a stream...
I have fired up 4 units in the last 3 days, new installs, that literally
poured water for several hours...and one person called me to ask why it
wasnt gushing like it was yesterday....hummm...could it be its got the
humidity down? Yes...that would be it.
Your units run condition can not really be determined by the amount of
condensate running out the pipe. Weather conditions, air infiltration, and
such will..

As long as you are having the unit serviced correctly, and its removing heat
from your home, do not worry about the amount of water leaving the unit,
unless of course, its stopped and you have a flooded furnace room..
 
C

CBHvac

You fucking idiot. What do you do for a living, load garbage
trucks ? Are you the poster child for the National Association of
Lobotomists ? Or did they drop you for being too fucking stupid ?
I think hes just fucking stupid.
We do this for a living, we know more about how systems need to be set up
properly and legally than they can know, untill they fix all the fuckups
like this guys described...and suddenly, we got a net expert on shit he cant
see..
Pull your head out of your ass and go borrow some money to buy
a clue.
Wait...I take that back about seeing shit..

It is absolutely 100 % normal and standard for condensate
lines to drain outside the house, not to the sewer system.
Not to mention, check the IMC and see where it says its legal..it aint..
Geezz...... you're too clueless to even bother insulting any
more. **** off, asshole.
Let him keep adding chlorine to the system...its WONDERFUL on the coils...I
got about 10 this year pulled that someone did that to.....amazing
whathappens to them....
 
M

Mark Jaggers

I am definately getting some interesting responses. I also got a
message from another HVAC guy and since the pipe comes out above our
bathroom window he thinks it is probably an overflow drain and that I
should check the main drain in the attic.

I guess I will just have to go up there and take a look. The reason I
became curious is because I dont remember this much water comeing from
it last year. Plust I noticed the next door neighbor has nothing
coming out of his pipe and we have identical units outside.

Mark
 
P

Phisherman

We had a similar situation. A PVC pipe coming out of the soffit was
dripping, splashing water onto the deck. I went into the attic to
find the pan under the A/C filled with water! I found a competent A/C
serviceman who replaced the exchanger. He said the original one was
undersized and rusted out. Now the pan is always dry, and the
condensate runs down a PVC pipe into a underground drain. I learned
there's a lot of shoddy A/C work done.
 
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C

CBHvac

Well...since its over a window, code here states that would HAVE to be an
overflow....
And your other HVAC guy is prob right...


Mark Jaggers said:
I am definately getting some interesting responses. I also got a
message from another HVAC guy and since the pipe comes out above our
bathroom window he thinks it is probably an overflow drain and that I
should check the main drain in the attic.

I guess I will just have to go up there and take a look. The reason I
became curious is because I dont remember this much water comeing from
it last year. Plust I noticed the next door neighbor has nothing
coming out of his pipe and we have identical units outside.

Mark




"HvacTech2" <dmurphy0533@comcast.net> wrote in message
Hi Bruce, hope you are having a nice day

On 14-Jul-03 At About 22:00:47, Bruce wrote to All
Subject: Re: Air Conditioners outside drip pipe question

B> From: (e-mail address removed) (Bruce)

B> In alt.home.repair (e-mail address removed) (Mark Jaggers) wrote:

B> > Is it normal for water to always be dripping from the outside pipe
B> > that comes out of the attic on our AC? > >I do not remember it
B> dripping this much last summer.

B> Well, I see an HVAC guy answered with a long detailed condescending
B> answer, and got it wrong. That pipe is an emergency overflow pipe
B> connected to an overflow pan under your evaporator. It should have
B> NOTHING dripping from it ever. When it does, it is because your
B> NORMAL condensate waste system is clogged.

B> Look for a pipe on the bottom of your evaporator and follow that to
B> where it connects to a sewer pipe. Something is clogged causing it
B> to backup and overflow to the overflow pan. Fix that, the dripping
B> will stop. Pour bleach in it each spring to kill the gunk and keep
B> it flowing freely.

You have it wrong here. run that pipe to a sewer stack and you could get
sewer gas in the house. The pipe he is talking about could be an overflow
safety but since you cannot you nor I can see it there is no way to know.
But saying an experienced tech got it wrong is usually a mistake.



-=> HvacTech2 <=-


.. "A friend of mine is in jail for counterfeiting pennies..."- s.w.

___ TagDude 0.92á+[DM]
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
spam protection measure, Please remove the 33 to send e-mail
 

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