AIr compressor repaired


S

Smitty Two

I spent a few hours today working on my air compressor at the shop. This
is something I cannot be without, so was tempted to go buy another one,
but this is not a cheap throwaway unit.

Symptoms were a tripping breaker, and an air "leak." I had to take more
stuff off of it than I wanted to, just to open it up further than I
wanted to. First attempt was unsuccessful. So, I did enough googling to
figure out that the "unloader valve" (from which the air would not stop
bleeding) and the "check valve" are two different things, although they
work together. This is an aspect of compressors that I had never
bothered to figure out. I did know that the pressure had to be relieved
for the motor to restart, but hadn't looked into the mechanics of it.

So after finding that the fault was not with the leaky part itself (the
unloader valve) I did figure out where the check valve might be, and it
turned out to be there, and it turned out to have a big piece of crud
jammed in it. The crud looked like a piece of a fiber washer, but it
crumbled like a piece of dried mud from the sole of a boot. I extracted
that without leaving pieces of it inside the valve, put it all together
again, and now it's fine.

And, I learned some things, which is good. But, the part that I really
like about this, is that if fell into a category I call Zero Dollar
Repairs. Those are my favorite kind.
 
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H

hr(bob) hofmann

Thanks, you give us hope.

Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
 www.lds.org
.


I spent a few hours today working on my air compressor at the shop. This
is something I cannot be without, so was tempted to go buy another one,
but this is not a cheap throwaway unit.

Symptoms were a tripping breaker, and an air "leak." I had to take more
stuff off of it than I wanted to, just to open it up further than I
wanted to. First attempt was unsuccessful. So, I did enough googling to
figure out that the "unloader valve" (from which the air would not stop
bleeding) and the "check valve" are two different things, although they
work together. This is an aspect of compressors that I had never
bothered to figure out. I did know that the pressure had to be relieved
for the motor to restart, but hadn't looked into the mechanics of it.

So after finding that the fault was not with the leaky part itself (the
unloader valve) I did figure out where the check valve might be, and it
turned out to be there, and it turned out to have a big piece of crud
jammed in it. The crud looked like a piece of a fiber washer, but it
crumbled like a piece of dried mud from the sole of a boot. I extracted
that without leaving pieces of it inside the valve, put it all together
again, and now it's fine.

And, I learned some things, which is good. But, the part that I really
like about this, is that if fell into a category I call Zero Dollar
Repairs. Those are my favorite kind.
I understand the unloader valve so the compressor starts under a no-
load situation, but what does the check valve do?
 
B

Bob F

hr(bob) [email protected] said:
I understand the unloader valve so the compressor starts under a no-
load situation, but what does the check valve do?
It keeps the air from going back into the cylinder at the piston goes back down.
 
J

Jon Danniken

But, the part that I really
like about this, is that if fell into a category I call Zero Dollar
Repairs. Those are my favorite kind.
Mine too. Sometimes when I am building something, and I realize that I
have been a slave to the hardware store for too long in the wallet, I
will switch to ZD (zero dollar) mode.

The challenge, of course, is that you have to re-design your widget to
consist of not only that which is logical, but also of things which you
already have.

I find, more often than not, that the results turn out far better than
they would have otherwise, and the experience is a far more satisfying
affair.

Jon
 
A

Ashton Crusher

I spent a few hours today working on my air compressor at the shop. This
is something I cannot be without, so was tempted to go buy another one,
but this is not a cheap throwaway unit.

Symptoms were a tripping breaker, and an air "leak." I had to take more
stuff off of it than I wanted to, just to open it up further than I
wanted to. First attempt was unsuccessful. So, I did enough googling to
figure out that the "unloader valve" (from which the air would not stop
bleeding) and the "check valve" are two different things, although they
work together. This is an aspect of compressors that I had never
bothered to figure out. I did know that the pressure had to be relieved
for the motor to restart, but hadn't looked into the mechanics of it.

So after finding that the fault was not with the leaky part itself (the
unloader valve) I did figure out where the check valve might be, and it
turned out to be there, and it turned out to have a big piece of crud
jammed in it. The crud looked like a piece of a fiber washer, but it
crumbled like a piece of dried mud from the sole of a boot. I extracted
that without leaving pieces of it inside the valve, put it all together
again, and now it's fine.

And, I learned some things, which is good. But, the part that I really
like about this, is that if fell into a category I call Zero Dollar
Repairs. Those are my favorite kind.

I was going to replace my dual cyl cast iron Montgomery ward 1HP.
Bought it used 15 years ago and it was old then. It had stopped
building pressure properly, low PSI and low volume. Took of the cover
over the reed valves and found that the rivets holding them in place
had come loose and the valves were no longer functioning. Replaced
rivets with screws and got the valves nice and tight again and it
works like a champ.
 
C

clare

I understand the unloader valve so the compressor starts under a no-
load situation, but what does the check valve do?
Very simple, it allows the unloader to unload the compressor head
without bleeding all the pressure out of the tank,
 
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C

clare

It keeps the air from going back into the cylinder at the piston goes back down.
No the exhaust (output) valves do that. The check valve is strictly
to allow the unloader to unload the compressor without the tank
re-pressurizing the manifold.
 
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Joined
Dec 8, 2016
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It is a secondary check that allows the compressor to dump the pressure between the pump and the tank, this is supposed to happen each time it shuts off. So that when the unit restarts it can do without working against tank pressure. It allows the pump and motor to get up to speed before it sees a load.
 

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