100W incandescent lightbulbs


A

ARWadsworth

So they are not extinct then. The girlfriend picked 8 100W Osrams up today
from Netto.

Also the manager at my local electrical wholesaler tells me that 500 are
arriving at his shop on monday.

Adam
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Adrian C

ARWadsworth said:
So they are not extinct then. The girlfriend picked 8 100W Osrams up today
from Netto.

Also the manager at my local electrical wholesaler tells me that 500 are
arriving at his shop on monday.
Whoops, unfortunately you've now alerted the green police. The store
will be raided, evidence collected and questions will be asked.

The merchandise will be removed under secure armed guard and destroyed
in a secret location ...
 
A

Andrew Gabriel

So they are not extinct then. The girlfriend picked 8 100W Osrams up today
from Netto.

Also the manager at my local electrical wholesaler tells me that 500 are
arriving at his shop on monday.
It's only a voluntary agreement amongst the large retailers at the moment.
Also, the main manufacturers stopped making 240V ones around September last
year in preparation for the wind down, so there won't be as many around,
and they'll be less well known makes (and they might be 220/230V, rather
than 240V).

EU plans on bringing in legally binding rules for September.
Then it will be 60W max anywhere (retail/wholesale/...), and no more pearl
GLS lamps at all (only clear GLS lamps, except for some specials such as
coloured lamps).
 
J

John Stumbles

It's only a voluntary agreement amongst the large retailers at the moment.
Also, the main manufacturers stopped making 240V ones around September last
year in preparation for the wind down, so there won't be as many around,
and they'll be less well known makes (and they might be 220/230V, rather
than 240V).
My outside light bulb went again last week. It's an old-fashioned
jam-jar hung from a shepherd's crook type designs, and it's on a PIR
which switches on when cats pass by (not meant to but it does) so even if
a CFL fitted in the lamp it wouldn't be much good. I wondered about a LED
lamp - ideal use for such things, but the commonly available ones seem
only to be in directional GU10 and suchlike arrangements. With time, money
and energy to spare a DIY project with some of these might be fun :)
http://tesladownunder.com/LEDs.htm#100 W LED

In the end I found that Screwfix (and doubtless others) do halogen
equivalents of GLS lamps for not-too-much wonga. About a third more
efficient (claimed) and no-brainer compatible.
 
A

ARWadsworth

Andrew Gabriel said:
It's only a voluntary agreement amongst the large retailers at the moment.
Also, the main manufacturers stopped making 240V ones around September
last
year in preparation for the wind down, so there won't be as many around,
and they'll be less well known makes (and they might be 220/230V, rather
than 240V).
Thank you Andrew. Very informative as per usual. The lamps from Netto are
240V. I have no idea what the wholesaler will supply.
EU plans on bringing in legally binding rules for September.
Then it will be 60W max anywhere (retail/wholesale/...), and no more pearl
GLS lamps at all (only clear GLS lamps, except for some specials such as
coloured lamps).
The Osram site gives additional reading for anyone interested

http://www.osram.com/osram_com/

Has anyone ever tried Osrams Night Breaker headlight bulbs?

Adam
 
O

OG

ARWadsworth said:
So they are not extinct then. The girlfriend picked 8 100W Osrams up today
from Netto.

Also the manager at my local electrical wholesaler tells me that 500 are
arriving at his shop on monday.

Yeah, with electricity as cheap as it is - why not?
 
Ad

Advertisements

C

Clot

Adrian said:
Whoops, unfortunately you've now alerted the green police. The store
will be raided, evidence collected and questions will be asked.

The merchandise will be removed under secure armed guard and destroyed
in a secret location ...
Adrian, that's enough! I had advised you not to reveal your cover at this
satge.

Please report to me in the morning.

Supergreen Superintendent Sid.
 
Ad

Advertisements

T

The Medway Handyman

ARWadsworth said:
To see properly in a room at night?
My garage/workshop is lit by 5 x 100w bulbs, whats the alternative? Don't
fancy flour essence due to possible flickering in synch with revolving saw
blades etc.
 
T

Toom Tabard

To see properly in a room at night?

Adam
My centre ceiling fitting in living room had 3 x 60-watt bayonet
candle bulbs. Difficult to find equivalent output in energy-saving
candles, so fitted 3 x 20- watt Phillips bayonet spirals. According to
the packaging that's about 345 watt equivalent in old money -
absolutely brilliant! Reasonably compact so they fit in the shades,
and look quite attractive too.

Anyone know if there's an energy-saving equivalent for Par 38 80-watt
bayonet floodlights which will give an acceptable equivalent light
output?

Toom
 
A

Andrew Gabriel

My garage/workshop is lit by 5 x 100w bulbs, whats the alternative? Don't
fancy flour essence due to possible flickering in synch with revolving saw
blades etc.
Use fluorescents with electronic ballasts.

I think the cheapest way to DIY them is to buy a cheap multi-pack
of fittings from somewhere like Wickes, chuck the ballast and
starter (and there won't even be a PFC capacitor;-), and get
a set of replacement electronic ballasts. eBay seems to be a
cheap place to get electronic ballasts, and you can get a small
selecetion from the likes of CPC/Farnell, but the specialist
electronic ballast suppliers' prices (or fittings pre-fitted
with electronic ballasts) are laughable.
 
A

Andrew Gabriel

My outside light bulb went again last week. It's an old-fashioned
jam-jar hung from a shepherd's crook type designs, and it's on a PIR
which switches on when cats pass by (not meant to but it does) so even if
a CFL fitted in the lamp it wouldn't be much good. I wondered about a LED
lamp - ideal use for such things, but the commonly available ones seem
only to be in directional GU10 and suchlike arrangements. With time, money
and energy to spare a DIY project with some of these might be fun :)
http://tesladownunder.com/LEDs.htm#100 W LED
I recently used a set of 3W Luxeon emitters to build a row of
lights to light up a path. The Luxeon emitters are very wide
angle by themselves, and several people make lenses/reflectors
to use with them. I used lenses to generate an eliptical beam,
20 degress by 5 degress, and then appropriately spaced the LEDs
at a height of about 20'. I found I could run them at about 1.7W
each and have plenty enough light (and should be very much longer
life than at 3W). I'm using the much less efficient warm white
ones too -- I didn't want a cold blue cast to the lighting.

I think there's still much unexploited potential in design of
LED luminares. People have got fixated on LED retrofits, and
those are doomed to be a dead loss. You could probably take your
light and make a very effective LED light from it, but not by
simply retrofitting something into the existing lampholder.
In the end I found that Screwfix (and doubtless others) do halogen
equivalents of GLS lamps for not-too-much wonga. About a third more
efficient (claimed) and no-brainer compatible.
Be careful. The ones I've seen claim to use 1/3rd (or whatever)
less power. They make no claims to produce the same light output
as the lamps they replace (and they don't). I filament lamp in
a fitting which swings in the wind probably won't get you full
life.
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Andrew Gabriel

My centre ceiling fitting in living room had 3 x 60-watt bayonet
candle bulbs. Difficult to find equivalent output in energy-saving
candles, so fitted 3 x 20- watt Phillips bayonet spirals. According to
the packaging that's about 345 watt equivalent in old money -
Actual equivalency is going to be somewhere from 240W to 280W.
You're looking at 80W equivalency per 20W CFL, although if they
are large spiral ones, they are a little better. Ignore the
equivalency on the packaging.
absolutely brilliant! Reasonably compact so they fit in the shades,
and look quite attractive too.

Anyone know if there's an energy-saving equivalent for Par 38 80-watt
bayonet floodlights which will give an acceptable equivalent light
output?
Do you really mean PAR38?
AFAIK, they are all ES, not BC.
 
D

Dave Osborne

The said:
My garage/workshop is lit by 5 x 100w bulbs, whats the alternative? Don't
fancy flour essence due to possible flickering in synch with revolving saw
blades etc.
4 or 5 foot fluorescents with high-frequency electronic ballasts.
Instant-on, long lamp life, no flickering.
 
T

Toom Tabard

Actual equivalency is going to be somewhere from 240W to 280W.
You're looking at 80W equivalency per 20W CFL, although if they
are large spiral ones, they are a little better. Ignore the
equivalency on the packaging.



Do you really mean PAR38?
AFAIK, they are all ES, not BC.
Yes. sorry, it's Par 38 - got the bayonet wrong - it's Edison Screw.
(I'll go and fall on my bayonet ;-))

Toom
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Andrew Gabriel

Think that's a bit of an urban myth with present day tubes - the phosphors
have a longer 'persistence' than once. But the certain way is to use
fittings with electronic ballasts - these switch at approx 30,000 times a
seconds rather than 100 as older ones do. You could fit new ballasts to
the existing fittings if you find a cheap source for them.
When you get up to about 5000 times a second, you're switching faster
than the decay time of an excited mercury ion, so the discharge becomes
continuous (and the tube becomes 5-10% more efficient). As you say,
all electronic control gear switches at well above 5000 times a second
(there are further advantages in minaturising the control gear by going
up to higher frequences).
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top