What will quickly remove Plasti-Dip?

Discussion in 'Home Repair' started by Doc, Jun 4, 2009.

  1. Doc

    Doc Guest

    I've got a dishwasher rack that was covered with Plasti-Dip in a
    misbegotten experiment to provide extra protection against corrosion.
    I've been using citrus based paint remover and Scotch Brite pads to
    remove it, which works after a fashion but is tedious and slow going.
    Will anything remove it rapidly without damaging the factory coating
    on the rack, which I assume to be some sort of epoxy?

    I'm talking about this stuff

    http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip


    While I'm on the subject, is there anything you can think of in the
    consumer market that could be applied to a dishwasher rack that will
    hold up in that environment?

    Thanks for all info
     
    Doc, Jun 4, 2009
    #1
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  2. Doc

    RicodJour Guest

    On Jun 4, 1:30 am, Doc <> wrote:
    > I've got a dishwasher rack that was covered with Plasti-Dip in a
    > misbegotten experiment to provide extra protection against corrosion.
    > I've been using citrus based paint remover and Scotch Brite pads to
    > remove it, which works after a fashion but is tedious and slow going.
    > Will anything remove it rapidly without damaging the factory coating
    > on the rack, which I assume to be some sort of epoxy?
    >
    > I'm talking about this stuff
    >
    > http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip
    >
    > While I'm on the subject, is there anything you can think of in the
    > consumer market that could be applied to a dishwasher rack that will
    > hold up in that environment?
    >
    > Thanks for all info


    Read the MSDS on the manufacturer's web site. The nasty chemicals are
    the solvents. There will most likely be a number of them. I don't
    know what coating is on a dishwasher rack, but those nasty chemicals
    will probably damage it. Sorry.

    R
     
    RicodJour, Jun 4, 2009
    #2
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  3. Doc

    fftt Guest

    On Jun 3, 10:30 pm, Doc <> wrote:
    > I've got a dishwasher rack that was covered with Plasti-Dip in a
    > misbegotten experiment to provide extra protection against corrosion.
    > I've been using citrus based paint remover and Scotch Brite pads to
    > remove it, which works after a fashion but is tedious and slow going.
    > Will anything remove it rapidly without damaging the factory coating
    > on the rack, which I assume to be some sort of epoxy?
    >
    > I'm talking about this stuff
    >
    > http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip
    >
    > While I'm on the subject, is there anything you can think of in the
    > consumer market that could be applied to a dishwasher rack that will
    > hold up in that environment?
    >
    > Thanks for all info


    not the answer you're looking for but.....

    instead of buying a new dishwasher rack or re-coating the old one, I
    was lucky to find a newer model of my machine that was being junked
    and I took the racks

    craigslist

    cheers
    Bob
     
    fftt, Jun 4, 2009
    #3
  4. Doc

    Frank Guest

    On Jun 4, 1:30 am, Doc <> wrote:
    > I've got a dishwasher rack that was covered with Plasti-Dip in a
    > misbegotten experiment to provide extra protection against corrosion.
    > I've been using citrus based paint remover and Scotch Brite pads to
    > remove it, which works after a fashion but is tedious and slow going.
    > Will anything remove it rapidly without damaging the factory coating
    > on the rack, which I assume to be some sort of epoxy?
    >
    > I'm talking about this stuff
    >
    > http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip
    >
    > While I'm on the subject, is there anything you can think of in the
    > consumer market that could be applied to a dishwasher rack that will
    > hold up in that environment?
    >
    > Thanks for all info


    A resin or worse a cured resin takes time for solvents to dissolve or
    penetrate. A paint remover that does not immediately evaprate should
    work best but might attack the epoxy coating.

    I would try regular naptha paint thinner first as this is primary
    solvent mentioned in the MSDS. More agressive might be nail polish
    remover or acetone and finally the stuff that contains methylene
    chloride which is gel like and does not readily evaporate.

    All this should be done outside with lots of ventilation.
     
    Frank, Jun 4, 2009
    #4
  5. Doc

    Terry Guest

    On Wed, 3 Jun 2009 22:30:18 -0700 (PDT), Doc <>
    wrote:

    >I've got a dishwasher rack that was covered with Plasti-Dip in a
    >misbegotten experiment to provide extra protection against corrosion.
    >I've been using citrus based paint remover and Scotch Brite pads to
    >remove it, which works after a fashion but is tedious and slow going.
    >Will anything remove it rapidly without damaging the factory coating
    >on the rack, which I assume to be some sort of epoxy?
    >
    >I'm talking about this stuff
    >
    >http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip
    >
    >
    >While I'm on the subject, is there anything you can think of in the
    >consumer market that could be applied to a dishwasher rack that will
    >hold up in that environment?
    >
    >Thanks for all info


    Hello Doc,

    The site you mentioned has a product called ReRACK that appears to be
    specifically for dishwasher racks.

    I think Plasti-Dip is a PVC plastisol. You might try a can of the
    solvent sold for PVC cement (plastic pipe cement).

    Best -- Terry
     
    Terry, Jun 4, 2009
    #5
  6. Doc

    aemeijers Guest

    fftt wrote:
    > On Jun 3, 10:30 pm, Doc <> wrote:
    >> I've got a dishwasher rack that was covered with Plasti-Dip in a
    >> misbegotten experiment to provide extra protection against corrosion.
    >> I've been using citrus based paint remover and Scotch Brite pads to
    >> remove it, which works after a fashion but is tedious and slow going.
    >> Will anything remove it rapidly without damaging the factory coating
    >> on the rack, which I assume to be some sort of epoxy?
    >>
    >> I'm talking about this stuff
    >>
    >> http://www.plastidip.com/home_solutions/Plasti_Dip
    >>
    >> While I'm on the subject, is there anything you can think of in the
    >> consumer market that could be applied to a dishwasher rack that will
    >> hold up in that environment?
    >>
    >> Thanks for all info

    >
    > not the answer you're looking for but.....
    >
    > instead of buying a new dishwasher rack or re-coating the old one, I
    > was lucky to find a newer model of my machine that was being junked
    > and I took the racks
    >
    > craigslist
    >
    > cheers
    > Bob


    Bingo! If the DW in question is a common brand and not too old, OP
    should cruise nearby apartment projects the first week of the month, and
    look for dishwasher boxes in the dumpsters. Most large complexes get DWs
    so cheap in bulk, that they treat them as disposable, and if it looks
    ratty between tenants, or stops working any time, they just plug in a
    new one and trash the old one without even trying to diagnose it. The
    racks are usually fine. Note that there are only a few actual
    manufacturers, and interchangeability is high.

    --
    aem sends...
     
    aemeijers, Jun 4, 2009
    #6
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