Wallpaper steamer: usage for steam cleaning

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by bruce_phipps@my-deja.com, Jan 25, 2005.

  1. Guest

    Just got one of those wallpaper steamers, £25 from B&Q. Invaluable for
    removing wallpaper which has been painted over.

    My question: Has anyone used one of these wallpaper steamers for
    general purpose steam cleaning? I have some old tiles in the kitchen
    and maybe a steam clean would brighten them up a bit.

    Bruce
     
    , Jan 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. Dave Guest

    Hi Bruce

    The boiler part will be almost identical, just the tools are different.
    If you can find a way to fit a very absorbant cloth like a terry
    toweling nappy over the pad it should work. The steam softens the
    muck, the towel absorbs it.

    Dave
     
    Dave, Jan 25, 2005
    #2
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  3. Guest

    >
    > The boiler part will be almost identical, just the tools are

    different.
    > If you can find a way to fit a very absorbant cloth like a terry
    > toweling nappy over the pad it should work. The steam softens the
    > muck, the towel absorbs it.
    >
    > Dave



    Thanks. The "tool" currently has solidified emulsion paint all over it.
    One must be able to buy replacements, its only a bit of plastic.

    Bruce
     
    , Jan 25, 2005
    #3
  4. Guest


    > > Thanks. The "tool" currently has solidified emulsion paint all over

    it.
    > > One must be able to buy replacements, its only a bit of plastic.

    >
    > Is it an Earlex one? I've seen various attachments for those in B&Q
    > (don't know how standard the couplings are between brands, but they
    > wouldn't fit my current Bosch one)
    >
    > David


    Yes, its an Earlex. I seem to remember in the box it came in, there was
    a leaflet listing available extension tools. But I threw it out. I'll
    have a trawl on the web, see what I can find...

    Bruce
     
    , Jan 25, 2005
    #4
  5. Guest

    > >
    > > Is it an Earlex one? I've seen various attachments for those in

    B&Q
    > > (don't know how standard the couplings are between brands, but they
    > > wouldn't fit my current Bosch one)
    > >
    > > David

    >
    > Yes, its an Earlex. I seem to remember in the box it came in, there

    was
    > a leaflet listing available extension tools. But I threw it out. I'll
    > have a trawl on the web, see what I can find...
    >
    > Bruce


    All the tools are listed on earlex.co.uk
    i could probably just wrap a towel round the end, though, to the same
    effect.
    When I've finished wallpaper stripping, I might have a go at steam
    cleaning that old carpet in the back bedroom.
    Hey, the golden age of steam power is back!

    Bruce
     
    , Jan 25, 2005
    #5
  6. Andy Dingley Guest

    On 25 Jan 2005 02:32:00 -0800, wrote:

    >Yes, its an Earlex. I seem to remember in the box it came in, there was
    >a leaflet listing available extension tools.


    One of mine is an Earlex. As a cleaning nozzle I just use a length of
    HDPE waterpipe, pushed crudely over the flexible hose.

    British Airways air-hostess galley gloves are the best things ever
    made for protecting your hands when steaming (there's a chap who was
    shifting them on eBay). Long gauntlets and steamproof. Lousy for
    conducted heat from an overn, but they're just the ticket for steam.
    The posh new silicone "lobster claw" oven gloves are good too, but
    they're clumsy.
     
    Andy Dingley, Jan 25, 2005
    #6
  7. Keith Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    Just got one of those wallpaper steamers, £25 from B&Q. Invaluable for
    removing wallpaper which has been painted over.

    My question: Has anyone used one of these wallpaper steamers for
    general purpose steam cleaning? I have some old tiles in the kitchen
    and maybe a steam clean would brighten them up a bit.

    Bruce

    I've got the steam cleaning kit from Earlix & used it for a number of
    chores, including cleaning grout and it does a reasonable job. It's pretty
    good at clearing dirt that's not actually 'baked' on, and for the lip
    between hobs & sinks and worktops.
    and it's the absolute mutts nutts for defrosting freezers. Not a good idea
    to steam leather settee cushions tho', it turns them grey & crinkly, a bit
    like SWMBO's face when she saw it :(

    Keith
     
    Keith, Jan 25, 2005
    #7
  8. Guest


    >
    > I've got the steam cleaning kit from Earlix & used it for a number of
    > chores, including cleaning grout and it does a reasonable job.


    How much is this?
    I want to have a shot at steam cleaning an old carpet -- if the kit is
    too expensive, I'll try wrapping an old tea towel on the end of the
    wallpaper tool!

    Bruce
     
    , Jan 26, 2005
    #8
  9. dmc Guest

    In article <>,
    <> wrote:
    >Just got one of those wallpaper steamers, =A325 from B&Q. Invaluable for
    >removing wallpaper which has been painted over.


    I discovered yesterday that they although it is pretty sucessful are
    removing the painted wallpaper in our bedroom it appears to do this by
    removing the plaster :-(

    Paper still firmly attached to the plaster that is now on the floor :)

    Oh well, I need more plastering practise anyway...

    Darren
     
    dmc, Jan 26, 2005
    #9
  10. Rob Morley Guest

    In article <>, "dmc"
    says...
    > In article <>,
    > <> wrote:
    > >Just got one of those wallpaper steamers, =A325 from B&Q. Invaluable for
    > >removing wallpaper which has been painted over.

    >
    > I discovered yesterday that they although it is pretty sucessful are
    > removing the painted wallpaper in our bedroom it appears to do this by
    > removing the plaster :-(
    >
    > Paper still firmly attached to the plaster that is now on the floor :)
    >

    If the plaster isn't blown already you're probably overheating it.
     
    Rob Morley, Jan 26, 2005
    #10
  11. dmc Guest

    In article <>,
    Rob Morley <> wrote:

    >> Paper still firmly attached to the plaster that is now on the floor :)


    >If the plaster isn't blown already you're probably overheating it.


    No - the plaster was well and truely knackered before I started tbh.

    For the last 5 years I've been tapping the wall gently and muttering "ooooo
    must sort this out sometime". Sometime appears to have caught up with me :)

    Darren
     
    dmc, Jan 26, 2005
    #11
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