Vermiculite to fill in the back of a fireback ?

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Graeme, Mar 28, 2005.

  1. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Ok So I am refitting a Victorian fireplace and have read that the fireback
    should be backfilled with a vermiculite mix (Sand cement and Vermiculite).
    My Local Builders merchants don't stock Vermiculite but I have seen it in
    Garden centres , Is this the same stuff?
    Does it matter?
    Should I just fill up the gap with old rubble as one web page suggests ?

    Any advice

    Many thanks
    Graeme
     
    Graeme, Mar 28, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. [news] wrote:

    > Graeme wrote:
    >
    >>Ok So I am refitting a Victorian fireplace and have read that the fireback
    >>should be backfilled with a vermiculite mix (Sand cement and Vermiculite).
    >>My Local Builders merchants don't stock Vermiculite but I have seen it in
    >>Garden centres , Is this the same stuff?

    >
    >
    > yes
    >
    >
    >>Does it matter?

    >
    >
    > I think so.
    >
    >
    >>Should I just fill up the gap with old rubble as one web page suggests ?

    >
    >
    > you could. some people put some corrugated cardboard behind the fireback
    > with a view to it burning away and leaving enough expansion gap to prevent
    > the fireback cracking (hmmm, right) then backfill with rubble.
    >
    > I filled the void behind my fireback with plain vermiculite scrounged from
    > discarded packing material at partners place of work. I made a slurry of
    > cement and vermiculite /only/ for the flaunching/sloped back thingy. when
    > used and it's covered in soot it looks ok, hasn't cracked, very inexpensive.
    >
    >

    My fireback cracked anyway, even though it was just propped against the
    back of the inglenook.

    >
    > RT
    >
    >
    >
     
    The Natural Philosopher, Mar 28, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Graeme wrote:
    > Ok So I am refitting a Victorian fireplace and have read that the fireback
    > should be backfilled with a vermiculite mix (Sand cement and Vermiculite).
    > My Local Builders merchants don't stock Vermiculite but I have seen it in
    > Garden centres , Is this the same stuff?
    > Does it matter?


    B&Q used to sell a high-volume ready mixed concrete mix that used
    vermiculite instead of the more usual mixed aggregate. Can't find it on
    the website (no surprise there then), but it was only a couple of year
    back when I bought a bag of the stuff.

    Cheers
    Clive
     
    Clive Summerfield, Mar 28, 2005
    #3
  4. Graeme

    Andy Wade Guest

    Graeme wrote:

    > Ok So I am refitting a Victorian fireplace and have read that the fireback
    > should be backfilled with a vermiculite mix (Sand cement and Vermiculite).


    Don't add sand. Just use a 1:6 (by volume!) mix of OP cement and
    vermiculite with an absolute minimum of water - just enough to get a
    workable grey gooey mass. Well that's what I did when I put my Baxi
    Burnall in a few years ago and it's been fine. I didn't use any
    cardboard - the weak vermiculite mix will allow a bit of movement. The
    cardboard backing is advised if you use the option of a more solid sand,
    cement and rubble infill.

    --
    Andy
     
    Andy Wade, Mar 28, 2005
    #4
  5. In article <>,
    "Graeme" <> writes:
    > Ok So I am refitting a Victorian fireplace and have read that the fireback
    > should be backfilled with a vermiculite mix (Sand cement and Vermiculite).
    > My Local Builders merchants don't stock Vermiculite but I have seen it in
    > Garden centres , Is this the same stuff?


    I bought a sack of it from Travis Perkins. Their computer said they
    had 3 sacks, but it took half the staff searching the yard for about
    15 minutes before they could find it. Their computer told them they
    hadn't sold any in the previous 12 months, and no one (including me)
    had any idea what a sack of it looked like.

    I used it as a layer of insulation under the sand and cement base
    for a fireplace (a sheet of expanded polystyrene seemed like a
    distincly bad idea;-)

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
     
    Andrew Gabriel, Mar 28, 2005
    #5
  6. Graeme

    Alan Guest

    Vermiculite is commonly used to insulate chimney flue liners.
    Try your local chimney company.
     
    Alan, Mar 29, 2005
    #6
  7. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "Tony Bryer" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>, Alan
    > wrote:
    >> Vermiculite is commonly used to insulate chimney flue liners.

    >
    > Sold as Micafil
    >
    > --
    > Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk
    > Free SEDBUK boiler database browser http://www.sda.co.uk/qsedbuk.htm
    >
    >

    Thanks for all the advice.

    I have found Vermiculite,
    10 Litre bags in B&Q about 4.50.

    Then a web serch found various sites selling 100L bags about 17.00 +
    Delivery (Mostly used for growing things indoors under lights without the
    aid of soil. Some of the sites offered '100% Confidential service'), Also a
    discusion on the magicmushroomforum.

    Then a phone call to a local Chimney company who gave me a name of a local
    company that do a 100L bag for 8.80 + Vat, and they have a trade counter and
    I can collect.

    Result !!

    Graeme.
     
    Graeme, Mar 30, 2005
    #7
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Replies:
    13
    Views:
    1,226
  2. Housemartin
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    266
    Mary Fisher
    Jul 3, 2008
  3. Vermiculite Insulation

    , Mar 14, 2005, in forum: Home Repair
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    806
    Doug Kanter
    Mar 15, 2005
  4. Joe D.
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    434
    Joe D.
    Dec 19, 2005
  5. Jim K

    To fill or not to fill?

    Jim K, Aug 21, 2013, in forum: UK DIY
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    96
    Jim K
    Aug 21, 2013
Loading...

Share This Page