ventilated lobby between bathroom and kitchen?

Discussion in 'UK Home Improvement' started by Chris Long, Aug 21, 2003.

  1. Chris Long

    Chris Long Guest

    I posted on here a while ago asking if anyone knew the current regulations
    for a bathroom adjacent to a kithcen. SOmeone told me that regulations had
    changed and it was know only necessary to have a wash basin in the the
    toilet area.

    However, watching a diy program on the telly it was stated that you do need
    a ventilated lobby area.

    Does anyone have any other info on this?

    What constitutes a ventilated lobby?, does it have to have doors?

    Thanks in advance

    --
    Chris Long
    www.chris.a.long.btinternet.co.uk

    (remove [spam] from email if needed)
     
    Chris Long, Aug 21, 2003
    #1
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  2. Chris Long

    BillR Guest

    Chris Long wrote:
    > I posted on here a while ago asking if anyone knew the current
    > regulations for a bathroom adjacent to a kithcen. SOmeone told me
    > that regulations had changed and it was know only necessary to have a
    > wash basin in the the toilet area.
    >
    > However, watching a diy program on the telly it was stated that you
    > do need a ventilated lobby area.

    You don't. Ask your local building control officier.
    The toilet must have ventilation and hand washing facility.
     
    BillR, Aug 21, 2003
    #2
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  3. Chris Long

    Hugo Nebula Guest

    From the chaotic regions of the Cryptosphere, "Chris Long"
    <chris.a.long[spam]@ntlworld.com> wrote on Thu, 21 Aug 2003 10:51:00
    +0100:

    >I posted on here a while ago asking if anyone knew the current regulations
    >for a bathroom adjacent to a kithcen. SOmeone told me that regulations had
    >changed and it was know only necessary to have a wash basin in the the
    >toilet area.


    This is true. The requirements changed in this regard (AFAIK) in
    1985.

    >However, watching a diy program on the telly it was stated that you do need
    >a ventilated lobby area.


    Makeover programmes know bugger all about the Building Regulations.
    I've seen the "experts" throw glazed kitchen extensions up, remove
    walls with gay abandon, and twitter about loft conversions which
    clearly don't comply; and then they'll say that kitchens and WCs need
    a lobby (ventilated or not) between them, or that a room needs a
    headroom of 2.3m.
    --
    Hugo Nebula
    "You know, I'd rather see this on TV,
    Tones it down" - Laurie Anderson
     
    Hugo Nebula, Aug 21, 2003
    #3
  4. Chris Long

    Chris Long Guest

    really?

    well im just awaiting my homebuyers survey. Currently the 'lobby' consists
    of an open doorway, no door attatched. It will be interesting to see if he
    comes up with anything. Such a shame as this 'lobby' area takes 3 square
    metres off the size of the kitchen and I had hope to incorporate a breakfast
    bar, oh well, back to the drawing board!

    --
    Chris Long
    www.chris.a.long.btinternet.co.uk

    (remove [spam] from email if needed)
    "martyn" <> wrote in message
    news:bi4gvb$nqd$...
    >
    > "Hugo Nebula" <Send-My-Spam-To: abuse@localhost> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > From the chaotic regions of the Cryptosphere, "Chris Long"
    > > <chris.a.long[spam]@ntlworld.com> wrote on Thu, 21 Aug 2003 10:51:00
    > > +0100:
    > >
    > > >I posted on here a while ago asking if anyone knew the current

    > regulations
    > > >for a bathroom adjacent to a kithcen. SOmeone told me that regulations

    > had
    > > >changed and it was know only necessary to have a wash basin in the the
    > > >toilet area.

    > >
    > > This is true. The requirements changed in this regard (AFAIK) in
    > > 1985.

    >
    > Although I bought a house a decade ago with a downstairs bathroom directly
    > off the kitchen, and the surveyor recorded this as an issue.
    >
    >
    > >
    > > >However, watching a diy program on the telly it was stated that you do

    > need
    > > >a ventilated lobby area.

    > >
    > > Makeover programmes know bugger all about the Building Regulations.
    > > I've seen the "experts" throw glazed kitchen extensions up, remove
    > > walls with gay abandon, and twitter about loft conversions which
    > > clearly don't comply; and then they'll say that kitchens and WCs need
    > > a lobby (ventilated or not) between them, or that a room needs a
    > > headroom of 2.3m.
    > > --
    > > Hugo Nebula
    > > "You know, I'd rather see this on TV,
    > > Tones it down" - Laurie Anderson

    >
    >
     
    Chris Long, Aug 22, 2003
    #4
  5. Chris Long

    Guest Guest

    "Chris Long" <chris.a.long[spam]@ntlworld.com> wrote

    > well im just awaiting my homebuyers survey. Currently the 'lobby' consists
    > of an open doorway, no door attatched. It will be interesting to see if he
    > comes up with anything. Such a shame as this 'lobby' area takes 3 square
    > metres off the size of the kitchen and I had hope to incorporate a

    breakfast
    > bar, oh well, back to the drawing board!



    Turn it into a storage area or, as my friend did, a "laundry room" with the
    washer etc in there. With fewer appliances and cabinets needed in the
    kitchen you may still be able to fit in your breakfast bar - the space she
    gained allowed my friend to fit a table and chairs into her kitchen.

    You see, the building regs aren't the only consideration. It may also be
    worth considering what visitors and potential housebuyers will think - the
    latter in particular could affect the pound in your pocket.

    Most people I know would strongly prefer a lobby between bathroom and
    kitchen. Especially if they saw the TV programme this morning announcing
    how many bugs were invisibly sprayed all over the room (and your toothbrush)
    if some bloke flushes without putting the seat and loo cover back down.
    Another issue is noise: some people don't like the thought of being
    overheard in the bathroom. And even good ventilation doesn't kill smells
    instantly - some smells are not pleasant in the kitchen.

    Even without a second door (and I'd be tempted to put up at least a curtain)
    the space is still some sort of barrier - at least psychologically, and
    taking into account how people feel in a home is really the key to good
    design.

    Barbara
     
    Guest, Aug 22, 2003
    #5
  6. Chris Long

    Chris Long Guest

    My main consideration is selling an and making it as attractive as possible.
    The kitchen is 3.10 x 2.08. Im not really sure I could fit a breakfast bar
    into this, it would be a squeeze. I also wanted to lighten the kitchen as
    the end wall blocks all the light out from the garden door.

    I suppose my other solution would be to use glass bricks for these walls to
    let the light in and forget a breakfast area. I wonder how more attractive
    the house would be if it has a small breakfast bar?

    --
    Chris Long
    www.chris.a.long.btinternet.co.uk

    (remove [spam] from email if needed)
    <> wrote in message
    news:bi565f$d1b$...
    > "Chris Long" <chris.a.long[spam]@ntlworld.com> wrote
    >
    > > well im just awaiting my homebuyers survey. Currently the 'lobby'

    consists
    > > of an open doorway, no door attatched. It will be interesting to see if

    he
    > > comes up with anything. Such a shame as this 'lobby' area takes 3 square
    > > metres off the size of the kitchen and I had hope to incorporate a

    > breakfast
    > > bar, oh well, back to the drawing board!

    >
    >
    > Turn it into a storage area or, as my friend did, a "laundry room" with

    the
    > washer etc in there. With fewer appliances and cabinets needed in the
    > kitchen you may still be able to fit in your breakfast bar - the space she
    > gained allowed my friend to fit a table and chairs into her kitchen.
    >
    > You see, the building regs aren't the only consideration. It may also be
    > worth considering what visitors and potential housebuyers will think - the
    > latter in particular could affect the pound in your pocket.
    >
    > Most people I know would strongly prefer a lobby between bathroom and
    > kitchen. Especially if they saw the TV programme this morning announcing
    > how many bugs were invisibly sprayed all over the room (and your

    toothbrush)
    > if some bloke flushes without putting the seat and loo cover back down.
    > Another issue is noise: some people don't like the thought of being
    > overheard in the bathroom. And even good ventilation doesn't kill smells
    > instantly - some smells are not pleasant in the kitchen.
    >
    > Even without a second door (and I'd be tempted to put up at least a

    curtain)
    > the space is still some sort of barrier - at least psychologically, and
    > taking into account how people feel in a home is really the key to good
    > design.
    >
    > Barbara
    >
    >
    >
     
    Chris Long, Aug 22, 2003
    #6
  7. Chris Long

    Guest Guest

    "Chris Long" <chris.a.long[spam]@ntlworld.com> wrote

    I wonder how more attractive the house would be if it has a small breakfast
    bar?


    Very good question.

    It depends, surely, on what other eating places there are in the house, and
    how convenient they are. And that depends on who and how many people might
    live in your house and what their lifestyles might be. I'm perfectly happy
    not to have a breakfast bar, but then I've a table and chairs directly
    outside the kitchen. But when we were kids and the dining table was some
    way away from the kitchen, a breakfast bar in the kitchen was a boon.

    The best solution, I think, might be to talk to some neighbours and see how
    they arrange what I assume are similar properties. If you want to sell,
    then a very clear idea of your target market is, I think, essential (I'm
    currently planning the same thing!)

    Barbara
     
    Guest, Aug 22, 2003
    #7
  8. Chris Long

    BillR Guest

    wrote:
    > "Chris Long" <chris.a.long[spam]@ntlworld.com> wrote
    >
    >> well im just awaiting my homebuyers survey. Currently the 'lobby'
    >> consists of an open doorway, no door attatched. It will be
    >> interesting to see if he comes up with anything. Such a shame as
    >> this 'lobby' area takes 3 square metres off the size of the kitchen
    >> and I had hope to incorporate a breakfast bar, oh well, back to the
    >> drawing board!

    >
    >
    > Turn it into a storage area or, as my friend did, a "laundry room"
    > with the washer etc in there. With fewer appliances and cabinets
    > needed in the kitchen you may still be able to fit in your breakfast
    > bar - the space she gained allowed my friend to fit a table and
    > chairs into her kitchen.
    >
    > You see, the building regs aren't the only consideration. It may
    > also be worth considering what visitors and potential housebuyers
    > will think - the latter in particular could affect the pound in your
    > pocket.
    >
    > Most people I know would strongly prefer a lobby between bathroom and
    > kitchen. Especially if they saw the TV programme this morning
    > announcing how many bugs were invisibly sprayed all over the room
    > (and your toothbrush) if some bloke flushes without putting the seat
    > and loo cover back down. Another issue is noise: some people don't
    > like the thought of being overheard in the bathroom. And even good
    > ventilation doesn't kill smells instantly - some smells are not
    > pleasant in the kitchen.

    All very true but when you're selling a place, if it looks more spacious
    without the lobby most punters wouldn't think about these aspects. I looked
    at some small flats recently for daughter. One had this lobby arrangement
    with wash m/c etc in it. The kitchen was minute and could have been 25%
    bigger if the lobby walls were removed.
     
    BillR, Aug 22, 2003
    #8
  9. Chris Long

    Chris Long Guest

    oh, yes, one last point

    I wonder what difference it makes in that we are adding a WC to the upstairs
    bedrooms. Kind of a shared ensuite toilet and washbasin. I wonder if the
    upstars toilet would be used more and ease the use from the downstairs,
    hence making the lobby area less necessary?

    --
    Chris Long
    www.chris.a.long.btinternet.co.uk

    (remove [spam] from email if needed)
    "BillR" <> wrote in message
    news:Vru1b.357$9.net...
    > wrote:
    > > "Chris Long" <chris.a.long[spam]@ntlworld.com> wrote
    > >
    > >> well im just awaiting my homebuyers survey. Currently the 'lobby'
    > >> consists of an open doorway, no door attatched. It will be
    > >> interesting to see if he comes up with anything. Such a shame as
    > >> this 'lobby' area takes 3 square metres off the size of the kitchen
    > >> and I had hope to incorporate a breakfast bar, oh well, back to the
    > >> drawing board!

    > >
    > >
    > > Turn it into a storage area or, as my friend did, a "laundry room"
    > > with the washer etc in there. With fewer appliances and cabinets
    > > needed in the kitchen you may still be able to fit in your breakfast
    > > bar - the space she gained allowed my friend to fit a table and
    > > chairs into her kitchen.
    > >
    > > You see, the building regs aren't the only consideration. It may
    > > also be worth considering what visitors and potential housebuyers
    > > will think - the latter in particular could affect the pound in your
    > > pocket.
    > >
    > > Most people I know would strongly prefer a lobby between bathroom and
    > > kitchen. Especially if they saw the TV programme this morning
    > > announcing how many bugs were invisibly sprayed all over the room
    > > (and your toothbrush) if some bloke flushes without putting the seat
    > > and loo cover back down. Another issue is noise: some people don't
    > > like the thought of being overheard in the bathroom. And even good
    > > ventilation doesn't kill smells instantly - some smells are not
    > > pleasant in the kitchen.

    > All very true but when you're selling a place, if it looks more spacious
    > without the lobby most punters wouldn't think about these aspects. I

    looked
    > at some small flats recently for daughter. One had this lobby arrangement
    > with wash m/c etc in it. The kitchen was minute and could have been 25%
    > bigger if the lobby walls were removed.
    >
    >
     
    Chris Long, Aug 22, 2003
    #9
  10. Chris Long

    Guest Guest

    "BillR" <> wrote

    > All very true but when you're selling a place, if it looks more spacious
    > without the lobby most punters wouldn't think about these aspects. I

    looked
    > at some small flats recently for daughter. One had this lobby arrangement
    > with wash m/c etc in it. The kitchen was minute and could have been 25%
    > bigger if the lobby walls were removed.



    Yes. That's the other side to the question, of course. There's no clear,
    right or wrong answer to this. I just wanted to be sure that the other
    side to the question was expressed, since I do know many people who do still
    want a lobby between bathroom and kitchen.

    The solution isn't really going to be clear to anyone who hasn't studied
    Chris's particular house. But I do know that in some houses the space in
    that lobby isn't used effectively. Once it is, it can make a vast
    difference to the kitchen or elsewhere by providing very useful storage or
    appliance space. When we did that to my friend's tiny one-bedroomed flat,
    where among other issues structural considerations made it unrealistic to
    remove the lobby, it made an enormous difference. She was able to turn the
    kitchen into a kitchen / diner releasing space in the living room which
    enabled her to create a home office behind the sofa, shielded behind a
    light, floaty curtain when not in use. And we made sure that the colours
    and surfaces in the kitchen were ones designed to maximise the light.

    Barbara
     
    Guest, Aug 23, 2003
    #10
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