uneven garage floor

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by JJ, Nov 26, 2008.

  1. JJ

    JJ Guest

    So, I've seen this problem posted a few places but have yet to find an
    easy and inexpensive stop-gap solution.

    I have a 2-car garage. My garage floor is just a concrete slab (no
    drain). In theory, it should angle slightly towards the front and
    center, but it is imperfect and when snow and ice falls off the car,
    what happens is from some places it moves toward the garage door or
    stays where it is (both fine), but from other places it moves toward
    the back or sides of the garage.

    I'm perfectly happy to take a broom or squeegee when necessary and
    push the water out the front. But because of lack of storage space
    elsewhere in the hose (no attic, tiny basement), I tend to store a lot
    of stuff in the garage. I have a various shelving units both in the
    back and sides of my garage. I've raised these wooden units up off
    the floor with bricks, but water will pool underneath these things and
    I can not easily get it out. Not to mention that some stuff is just
    on the floor.

    For the past few years, I've been using these vinyl car-pads (http://
    www.carpad.com/carpads.html) under the cars to contain the water, and
    then I push it out when necessary. But they have deteriorated, and
    don't hold the water as well any more, not to mention that they have
    bunched up in certain places making it difficult to push the water
    out. Also, they tend to stay wet underneath all winter, which can't
    be good for concrete slab. And they're kind of pricey.

    It would be nice to make a shallow (1-2") berm around the area where
    the cars are parked. Then the water wouldn't get to my storage area,
    and I could just push it out when necessary. This product looks like
    it could do the trick (http://www.newpig.com/en_US/st/
    2LHBCONTAINMENTBERMS.html), but it seems ridiculously expensive for
    what you get.

    Any tips on how to resolve this problem quickly, easily and
    inexpensively?

    Thanks.

    -Jonathan
     
    JJ, Nov 26, 2008
    #1
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  2. JJ

    SteveBell Guest

    JJ wrote in
    <>:

    > 2LHBCONTAINMENTBERMS.html


    Bite the bullet and have a concrete grinder slope the concrete
    properly. You'll be done and never have to worry about it again.

    Alternatively, have a concrete company put a skim layer on top. These
    aren't always successful, since they can delaminate.

    --
    Steve Bell
    New Life Home Improvement
    Arlington, TX
     
    SteveBell, Nov 26, 2008
    #2
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  3. "SteveBell" <> wrote:

    >Bite the bullet and have a concrete grinder slope the concrete
    >properly. You'll be done and never have to worry about it again.
    >
    >Alternatively, have a concrete company put a skim layer on top. These
    >aren't always successful, since they can delaminate.


    There are also companies that will hydrojack the slab. Basically, that involves
    drilling holes and injecting enough slurry to regain the slope that should be
    there. Not particularly expensive, but it does require a crew that knows how to
    do it as it is easy to break the slab if you do it wrong.
     
    Robert Neville, Nov 27, 2008
    #3
  4. JJ

    Forrest Guest

    "JJ" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > So, I've seen this problem posted a few places but have yet to find an
    > easy and inexpensive stop-gap solution.
    >
    > I have a 2-car garage. My garage floor is just a concrete slab (no
    > drain). In theory, it should angle slightly towards the front and
    > center, but it is imperfect and when snow and ice falls off the car,
    > what happens is from some places it moves toward the garage door or
    > stays where it is (both fine), but from other places it moves toward
    > the back or sides of the garage.
    >
    > I'm perfectly happy to take a broom or squeegee when necessary and
    > push the water out the front. But because of lack of storage space
    > elsewhere in the hose (no attic, tiny basement), I tend to store a lot
    > of stuff in the garage. I have a various shelving units both in the
    > back and sides of my garage. I've raised these wooden units up off
    > the floor with bricks, but water will pool underneath these things and
    > I can not easily get it out. Not to mention that some stuff is just
    > on the floor.
    >
    > For the past few years, I've been using these vinyl car-pads (http://
    > www.carpad.com/carpads.html) under the cars to contain the water, and
    > then I push it out when necessary. But they have deteriorated, and
    > don't hold the water as well any more, not to mention that they have
    > bunched up in certain places making it difficult to push the water
    > out. Also, they tend to stay wet underneath all winter, which can't
    > be good for concrete slab. And they're kind of pricey.
    >
    > It would be nice to make a shallow (1-2") berm around the area where
    > the cars are parked. Then the water wouldn't get to my storage area,
    > and I could just push it out when necessary. This product looks like
    > it could do the trick (http://www.newpig.com/en_US/st/
    > 2LHBCONTAINMENTBERMS.html), but it seems ridiculously expensive for
    > what you get.
    >
    > Any tips on how to resolve this problem quickly, easily and
    > inexpensively?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -Jonathan


    Don't know how permanent you want it or how fancy but, how about making the
    berm with a row of small bricks? If those are too thick, they sell some that
    are half the thickness. Just cement them down or if that's too permanent use
    a couple of beads of bathroom caulk in the tube or silicone or Liquid nails.
    If you want it smaller and low, how about using the frame material that they
    sell for plastic lattice and stick that down?
     
    Forrest, Nov 27, 2008
    #4
  5. JJ

    Bob F Guest

    "Forrest" <> wrote in message
    news:%anXk.6329$...
    >
    > "JJ" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> So, I've seen this problem posted a few places but have yet to find an
    >> easy and inexpensive stop-gap solution.
    >>
    >> I have a 2-car garage. My garage floor is just a concrete slab (no
    >> drain). In theory, it should angle slightly towards the front and
    >> center, but it is imperfect and when snow and ice falls off the car,
    >> what happens is from some places it moves toward the garage door or
    >> stays where it is (both fine), but from other places it moves toward
    >> the back or sides of the garage.
    >>
    >> I'm perfectly happy to take a broom or squeegee when necessary and
    >> push the water out the front. But because of lack of storage space
    >> elsewhere in the hose (no attic, tiny basement), I tend to store a lot
    >> of stuff in the garage. I have a various shelving units both in the
    >> back and sides of my garage. I've raised these wooden units up off
    >> the floor with bricks, but water will pool underneath these things and
    >> I can not easily get it out. Not to mention that some stuff is just
    >> on the floor.
    >>
    >> For the past few years, I've been using these vinyl car-pads (http://
    >> www.carpad.com/carpads.html) under the cars to contain the water, and
    >> then I push it out when necessary. But they have deteriorated, and
    >> don't hold the water as well any more, not to mention that they have
    >> bunched up in certain places making it difficult to push the water
    >> out. Also, they tend to stay wet underneath all winter, which can't
    >> be good for concrete slab. And they're kind of pricey.
    >>
    >> It would be nice to make a shallow (1-2") berm around the area where
    >> the cars are parked. Then the water wouldn't get to my storage area,
    >> and I could just push it out when necessary. This product looks like
    >> it could do the trick (http://www.newpig.com/en_US/st/
    >> 2LHBCONTAINMENTBERMS.html), but it seems ridiculously expensive for
    >> what you get.
    >>
    >> Any tips on how to resolve this problem quickly, easily and
    >> inexpensively?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> -Jonathan

    >
    > Don't know how permanent you want it or how fancy but, how about making the
    > berm with a row of small bricks? If those are too thick, they sell some that
    > are half the thickness. Just cement them down or if that's too permanent use a
    > couple of beads of bathroom caulk in the tube or silicone or Liquid nails. If
    > you want it smaller and low, how about using the frame material that they sell
    > for plastic lattice and stick that down?


    They make a rubber wire casing for use where wires must be placed on floors
    where people walk. That could be caulked to the floor to form a berm that would
    probaly last well and be a lot cheaper than the thing the OP had.

    http://cableorganizer.com/cord-protector/in.html

    Cut the corners at 45 degrees and caulk the joints.
     
    Bob F, Nov 27, 2008
    #5
  6. JJ

    JJ Guest

    Thanks for the suggestions. I like the idea of caulking down some
    kind of barrier (like the suggested rubber wire conduit). If I decide
    to go this route, What kind of caulk should I use? Will my garage
    floor need to be dry and warm in order for this to work? The odds of
    the floor being totally dry any time soon are slim. And It hasn't got
    out of the 30s during the day here in the past 12 days, and there's no
    sign of it warming up any time soon. At night it's been in the teens
    and twenties (down to single digits one night). Much colder than
    usual for this time of year here in central NY. The garage is usually
    a bit warmer than outside, but usually only about 5 - 10 degrees at
    most.

    Thanks.

    -Jonathan
     
    JJ, Nov 28, 2008
    #6
  7. JJ

    Boden Guest

    JJ wrote:
    > Thanks for the suggestions. I like the idea of caulking down some
    > kind of barrier (like the suggested rubber wire conduit). If I decide
    > to go this route, What kind of caulk should I use? Will my garage
    > floor need to be dry and warm in order for this to work? The odds of
    > the floor being totally dry any time soon are slim. And It hasn't got
    > out of the 30s during the day here in the past 12 days, and there's no
    > sign of it warming up any time soon. At night it's been in the teens
    > and twenties (down to single digits one night). Much colder than
    > usual for this time of year here in central NY. The garage is usually
    > a bit warmer than outside, but usually only about 5 - 10 degrees at
    > most.
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -Jonathan

    I've done this by laying concrete bricks end to end around the area I
    wanted to contain. It's easiest to use a tube of urethane caulk in a
    caulking gun. Urethane needs moisture to cure so a damp floor is fine.
     
    Boden, Nov 28, 2008
    #7
  8. JJ

    JJ Guest

    Thanks for the tips. I looked at the gazillions of different caulks
    they had at Lowes, and even the one that mentioned eurethane, claimed
    it needed to be dry to cure. I didn't see any caulks there that
    needed moisture to cure. I'll probably just suffer through this winter
    and see if I can apply a fix in the warmer weather.

    I shouldn't ever have to drive over the caulk - but I would be using a
    push-broom or squeegee near it to push the water towards the front of
    the garage.

    -Jonathan

    >
    > I also would recommend urethane caulk. It's hard to find these days, though.
    > H.D. and Lowes don't seem to have it these days. I just got some at a
    > construction supply place.
    >
    > Whatever the O.P. does, if it's really cold,it will take a long time to cure. It
    > would need to be cured before driving over it.
     
    JJ, Dec 10, 2008
    #8
  9. JJ

    Bob F Guest

    "JJ" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks for the tips. I looked at the gazillions of different caulks
    > they had at Lowes, and even the one that mentioned eurethane, claimed
    > it needed to be dry to cure. I didn't see any caulks there that
    > needed moisture to cure. I'll probably just suffer through this winter
    > and see if I can apply a fix in the warmer weather.


    Urethane does need moisture to cure, but not very much. Just the moisture in the
    air.
     
    Bob F, Dec 12, 2008
    #9
  10. JJ

    Oren Guest

    On Thu, 11 Dec 2008 16:04:35 -0800, "Bob F" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"JJ" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Thanks for the tips. I looked at the gazillions of different caulks
    >> they had at Lowes, and even the one that mentioned eurethane, claimed
    >> it needed to be dry to cure. I didn't see any caulks there that
    >> needed moisture to cure. I'll probably just suffer through this winter
    >> and see if I can apply a fix in the warmer weather.

    >
    >Urethane does need moisture to cure, but not very much. Just the moisture in the
    >air.
    >


    Look for a butyl caulk (bitch-a-thane), They make cars, buses, box
    cars trains, and planes with it.. Said to "stick to a ball of lard"!

    Price may be up past $7.00 a tube now.
     
    Oren, Dec 12, 2008
    #10
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