Understanding Colour

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by hot.amelia@gmail.com, Jan 15, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Understanding Colour

    Accustomed, as we are today, to having literally hundreds of paint
    colours available at the touch of the button on an automatic mixing
    machine, as well as the choice of thousands of textiles, printed and
    woven in bright design, it is instructive to think of the lengths -
    the sheer inventiveness and resourcefulness - to which people have gone
    in order to bring colour into their lives.


    All paint colours and dyes as we know them today are, derived from
    mixing pigment with a binding medium, which allows them to be
    transferred onto a surface. Until the middle of the nineteenth century,
    when rapid chemical advance were made and pigments began to produced
    synthetically, colours were naturally obtained from the minerals and
    earth, vegetables and plants that were available. Early mediums
    included egg for the making of tempera, and later oil.
    There are about eight earth pigment, including sienna, ochre and umber,
    and these could be mixed with minerals like iron oxide and copper-based
    pigments to give a range of colours that suited every need. Roots like
    indigo were used, too. Rare, precious - and correspondingly expensive
    - colours ware also made: rich ultramarine blue from crushed, ground
    lapis lazuli, and the brightest green from malachite treated in the
    same way. The tones and hues of colours differed, of course, from
    region to region, which is why we associate today certain colours -
    particularly those made from earth and clay - with certain areas.


    Yarn, too, was rarely left in its natural, undyed state. From flowers
    and fruits to roots and bark - and even shellfish - dyes were
    squeezed from the natural world to brings colours to the neutral tones
    of wool, linen and cotton. In fact, textile rather than flat planes of
    colours seen on wall, are often the starting point for colours
    inspirations. Historically, fashion has inspired choices of decorative
    colours and it still does. To got to a museum of costume or an archive
    exhibition can be positively regenerating - the colour of embroidered
    threads on a eighteenth-century brocade waistcoat. The woven design on
    a nineteenth-century 'kirking' shawl. Modern fashion can be equally
    thought-provoking - booth street and couture fashion are constantly
    looking for new ways to use colour, many of which can be translated
    into decorative terms. This is also true of accessories : many couture
    houses, for example, once designed silk headscarves (an essential for
    the elegant woman). Painted design were hand-screened onto silk
    squares, and the though and subtlety of colour that went into these
    period pieces are text book examples of the use of colour....

    GET FREE home Design Tips N Info,only at

    http://homedesign-tips.blogspot.com/2007/01/understanding-colour.html
    , Jan 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. Dave Guest

    wrote:
    > Understanding Colour
    >
    > Accustomed, as we are today, to having literally hundreds of paint
    > colours available at the touch of the button on an automatic mixing
    > machine, as well as the choice of thousands of textiles, printed and
    > woven in bright design, it is instructive to think of the lengths -
    > the sheer inventiveness and resourcefulness - to which people have gone
    > in order to bring colour into their lives.


    But how does this help me, you might ask?

    I am slightly red/green colour blind. I enjoy photography, but I do have
    a problem with colour casts on my work.

    In the real world, I see colours in a different way that a normal person
    does.

    Now how can you help _me_?

    Dave
    Dave, Jan 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. Mary Fisher Guest

    "Dave" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > wrote:
    >> Understanding Colour
    >>
    >> Accustomed, as we are today, to having literally hundreds of paint
    >> colours available at the touch of the button on an automatic mixing
    >> machine, as well as the choice of thousands of textiles, printed and
    >> woven in bright design, it is instructive to think of the lengths -
    >> the sheer inventiveness and resourcefulness - to which people have gone
    >> in order to bring colour into their lives.

    >
    > But how does this help me, you might ask?
    >
    > I am slightly red/green colour blind. I enjoy photography, but I do have a
    > problem with colour casts on my work.
    >
    > In the real world, I see colours in a different way that a normal person
    > does.
    >
    > Now how can you help _me_?


    I can't, it must be a distressing handicap in photography :-(

    Mary
    >
    > Dave
    Mary Fisher, Jan 15, 2007
    #3
  4. Andy Dingley Guest

    wrote:

    > Understanding Spamming of low-content sites that have about as much information in them as reading Markov chains.


    > All paint colours and dyes as we know them today are, derived from
    > mixing pigment with a binding medium,


    Dyes don't have pigment in them, that's why they're dyes.

    > which allows them to be transferred onto a surface.


    So what about dyes that don't merely affect the surface?

    > Until the middle of the nineteenth century,
    > when rapid chemical advance were made and pigments began to produced
    > synthetically,


    So what about all the medieval synthetic pigments? OK, so most of them
    were horribly toxic and too expensive for wide use, but they were there
    and they pre-dated the anilines.

    > Early mediums included egg for the making of tempera,


    The only thing mediums every made were knocking noises and calico
    ectoplasm. If you can't even pluralise the word correctly, why should
    we read your spiel?

    It's like reading a Steve Aylett novel. All the words are there,
    they're just not put together to mean anything.

    > There are about eight earth pigment, including sienna, ochre and umber,


    I've got at least eight different European _ochres_ in the workshop
    right now, let alone the siennas, umbers and the rest of the world's
    earth pigments.

    > and these could be mixed with minerals like iron oxide and copper-based
    > pigments


    So which of the minerals aren't earth pigments? And what's ochre if it
    isn't an iron oxide.

    > Roots like indigo were used, too.


    A root? Chinese medicine uses indigo roots but if you're dyeing (rather
    than dying) you'll be wanting the leaves of indigo or woad instead.

    > the colour of embroidered threads on a eighteenth-century brocade waistcoat.


    Please, if you're going to spout this worthless drivel at least learn
    what "brocade" actually is, and how it's different from embroidery.
    Otherwise you just sound like television.

    > Painted design were hand-screened onto silk squares,


    Just what is "Painted design were hand-screened" supposed to mean?
    Was it painted? Or was it screened?
    Andy Dingley, Jan 15, 2007
    #4
  5. Dave wrote:
    >
    > I am slightly red/green colour blind. I enjoy photography, but I do
    > have a problem with colour casts on my work.
    >
    > In the real world, I see colours in a different way that a normal
    > person does.
    >
    > Now how can you help _me_?
    >


    Just a vague wondering - is there no glasses/filter type thingy available to
    those colour blind?

    CBA to Google :eek:)

    Si
    Mungo \Two Sheds\ Toadfoot, Jan 15, 2007
    #5
  6. Dave Guest

    Mary Fisher wrote:
    > "Dave" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Understanding Colour
    >>>
    >>>Accustomed, as we are today, to having literally hundreds of paint
    >>>colours available at the touch of the button on an automatic mixing
    >>>machine, as well as the choice of thousands of textiles, printed and
    >>>woven in bright design, it is instructive to think of the lengths -
    >>>the sheer inventiveness and resourcefulness - to which people have gone
    >>>in order to bring colour into their lives.

    >>
    >>But how does this help me, you might ask?
    >>
    >>I am slightly red/green colour blind. I enjoy photography, but I do have a
    >>problem with colour casts on my work.
    >>
    >>In the real world, I see colours in a different way that a normal person
    >>does.
    >>
    >>Now how can you help _me_?

    >
    >
    > I can't, it must be a distressing handicap in photography :-(


    Funnily enough, it isn't. I suffer most when I have taken a photo when
    there is artificial light about. I have learned to avoid this by upping
    the flash intensity. (The camera might say the light is OK, but I switch
    on the flash and avoid colour cast.

    I recently tried to produce a new passport photo for my wife. I took it
    against the recommended light grey background, but when I came to print
    it out it had a yellow/red cast on it. (Even I could see that). I think
    the problem came from the fact that the room light was a lot closer to
    her face than was the flash gun. Oh well, better luck next time :)

    Mostly, the colour casts come from scans. I scan in a photo and when I
    come to print it out, there is a cast on it. The monitor is set up OK,
    as is the scanner, but there is some interaction between the scanner and
    monitor that I have not found out about yet. I'll get there eventually.

    Dave
    Dave, Jan 15, 2007
    #6
  7. Dave Guest

    Mungo "Two Sheds" Toadfoot wrote:

    > Dave wrote:
    >
    >>I am slightly red/green colour blind. I enjoy photography, but I do
    >>have a problem with colour casts on my work.
    >>
    >>In the real world, I see colours in a different way that a normal
    >>person does.
    >>
    >>Now how can you help _me_?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Just a vague wondering - is there no glasses/filter type thingy available to
    > those colour blind?
    >
    > CBA to Google :eek:)
    >
    > Si
    >
    >

    An interesting point, but can you point me to the right words to ask
    Google please :)

    Dave
    Dave, Jan 15, 2007
    #7
  8. Dave wrote:
    > Mary Fisher wrote:
    >> "Dave" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Understanding Colour
    >>>>
    >>>> Accustomed, as we are today, to having literally hundreds of paint
    >>>> colours available at the touch of the button on an automatic mixing
    >>>> machine, as well as the choice of thousands of textiles, printed and
    >>>> woven in bright design, it is instructive to think of the lengths -
    >>>> the sheer inventiveness and resourcefulness - to which people have gone
    >>>> in order to bring colour into their lives.
    >>>
    >>> But how does this help me, you might ask?
    >>>
    >>> I am slightly red/green colour blind. I enjoy photography, but I do
    >>> have a problem with colour casts on my work.
    >>>
    >>> In the real world, I see colours in a different way that a normal
    >>> person does.
    >>>
    >>> Now how can you help _me_?

    >>
    >>
    >> I can't, it must be a distressing handicap in photography :-(

    >
    > Funnily enough, it isn't. I suffer most when I have taken a photo when
    > there is artificial light about. I have learned to avoid this by upping
    > the flash intensity. (The camera might say the light is OK, but I switch
    > on the flash and avoid colour cast.
    >
    > I recently tried to produce a new passport photo for my wife. I took it
    > against the recommended light grey background, but when I came to print
    > it out it had a yellow/red cast on it. (Even I could see that). I think
    > the problem came from the fact that the room light was a lot closer to
    > her face than was the flash gun. Oh well, better luck next time :)
    >
    > Mostly, the colour casts come from scans. I scan in a photo and when I
    > come to print it out, there is a cast on it. The monitor is set up OK,
    > as is the scanner, but there is some interaction between the scanner and
    > monitor that I have not found out about yet. I'll get there eventually.
    >


    Its called photoshop.

    You can correct anything, as I found out when I accidentally picked up
    the 'other' camera and took it on holiday..the one that had a 12 year
    old slide film in it..I us dto run two cameras - one slide, and one
    print..then I dropped the slides and never used that body for that long..


    Well I got the slides scanned and was able to actually get all the
    colors back to normal..huge boost of the blue, and a huge cut in the
    green made sardinia look less like Mars...
    > Dave
    The Natural Philosopher, Jan 16, 2007
    #8
  9. Dave Guest

    The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    > Dave wrote:
    >
    >> Mary Fisher wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Dave" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Understanding Colour
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Accustomed, as we are today, to having literally hundreds of paint
    >>>>> colours available at the touch of the button on an automatic mixing
    >>>>> machine, as well as the choice of thousands of textiles, printed and
    >>>>> woven in bright design, it is instructive to think of the lengths -
    >>>>> the sheer inventiveness and resourcefulness - to which people have
    >>>>> gone
    >>>>> in order to bring colour into their lives.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> But how does this help me, you might ask?
    >>>>
    >>>> I am slightly red/green colour blind. I enjoy photography, but I do
    >>>> have a problem with colour casts on my work.
    >>>>
    >>>> In the real world, I see colours in a different way that a normal
    >>>> person does.
    >>>>
    >>>> Now how can you help _me_?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I can't, it must be a distressing handicap in photography :-(

    >>
    >>
    >> Funnily enough, it isn't. I suffer most when I have taken a photo when
    >> there is artificial light about. I have learned to avoid this by
    >> upping the flash intensity. (The camera might say the light is OK, but
    >> I switch on the flash and avoid colour cast.
    >>
    >> I recently tried to produce a new passport photo for my wife. I took
    >> it against the recommended light grey background, but when I came to
    >> print it out it had a yellow/red cast on it. (Even I could see that).
    >> I think the problem came from the fact that the room light was a lot
    >> closer to her face than was the flash gun. Oh well, better luck next
    >> time :)
    >>
    >> Mostly, the colour casts come from scans. I scan in a photo and when I
    >> come to print it out, there is a cast on it. The monitor is set up OK,
    >> as is the scanner, but there is some interaction between the scanner
    >> and monitor that I have not found out about yet. I'll get there
    >> eventually.
    >>

    >
    > Its called photoshop.
    >
    > You can correct anything, as I found out when I accidentally picked up
    > the 'other' camera and took it on holiday..the one that had a 12 year
    > old slide film in it..I us dto run two cameras - one slide, and one
    > print..then I dropped the slides and never used that body for that long..
    >
    >
    > Well I got the slides scanned and was able to actually get all the
    > colors back to normal..huge boost of the blue, and a huge cut in the
    > green made sardinia look less like Mars...


    IKWYM :) But when I say 'I like that yellow' and my wife says 'that's
    green' I tend to avoid colour changes.

    As it happens, I have photoshop and use it a lot, but colour casts beat
    me on screen. I'm not too bad when it is printed, (with a little help
    from my wife though).

    Dave
    Dave, Jan 16, 2007
    #9
  10. Rod Guest

    Dave wrote:
    > Mungo "Two Sheds" Toadfoot wrote:
    >
    >> Dave wrote:
    >>
    >>> I am slightly red/green colour blind. I enjoy photography, but I do
    >>> have a problem with colour casts on my work.
    >>>
    >>> In the real world, I see colours in a different way that a normal
    >>> person does.
    >>>
    >>> Now how can you help _me_?
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> Just a vague wondering - is there no glasses/filter type thingy
    >> available to those colour blind?
    >>
    >> CBA to Google :eek:)
    >>
    >> Si
    >>

    > An interesting point, but can you point me to the right words to ask
    > Google please :)
    >
    > Dave


    Just have a look here:

    <http://www.vischeck.com/>

    Has tests for several types of colour blindness, simulations of how
    colour blind people see things, tool for 'correcting' your images into
    how they look to colour blind people, Photoshop plug-ins, etc.

    When I first found it, I had a 'this is what the web should be about'
    moment.

    --
    Rod
    Rod, Jan 17, 2007
    #10
  11. Mary Fisher Guest

    "Rod" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >

    ....

    > When I first found it, I had a 'this is what the web should be about'
    > moment.


    That must have been nice :)

    Mary
    >
    > --
    > Rod
    Mary Fisher, Jan 17, 2007
    #11
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