UK washing machine manufacturer?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by Andrew Gabriel, May 25, 2009.

  1. Anyone know if any of the washing machine manufacturers still make
    any of them in the UK? I'm going to need a new one, and if there
    are still any made here, I'd take a first look at them.

    I know Hotpoint used to manufacture in Peterborough back when it
    was part of GEC and later GE, but as it's now a name owned by
    Indesit/Merloni, they might not have any manufacturing here
    anymore (I don't know).

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
    Andrew Gabriel, May 25, 2009
    #1
  2. In article <>,
    Frank Erskine <> writes:
    > On 25 May 2009 21:42:04 GMT, (Andrew
    > Gabriel) had this to say:
    >
    >>Anyone know if any of the washing machine manufacturers still make
    >>any of them in the UK? I'm going to need a new one, and if there
    >>are still any made here, I'd take a first look at them.
    >>
    >>I know Hotpoint used to manufacture in Peterborough back when it
    >>was part of GEC and later GE, but as it's now a name owned by
    >>Indesit/Merloni, they might not have any manufacturing here
    >>anymore (I don't know).

    >
    > Apparently Hoover have recently closed their washing machine plant in
    > Wales. Not that their recent machines have been any good at all...


    Just found that Indesit (Hotpoint) are in the middle of closing
    their washing machine factory in Wales...
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/7921557.stm

    The Peterborough factory (fridge/freezers) closed last year.

    Look like we just can't make anything, sigh.

    > Anyone else remember the Rolls washing machine? Wasn't that made in
    > England?
    >


    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
    Andrew Gabriel, May 26, 2009
    #2
  3. Andrew Gabriel

    David Guest

    On 26 May, 01:25, (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:
    > In article <>,
    >         Frank Erskine <> writes:
    >
    > > On 25 May 2009 21:42:04 GMT, (Andrew
    > > Gabriel) had this to say:

    >
    > >>Anyone know if any of the washing machine manufacturers still make
    > >>any of them in the UK? I'm going to need a new one, and if there
    > >>are still any made here, I'd take a first look at them.

    >
    > >>I know Hotpoint used to manufacture in Peterborough back when it
    > >>was part of GEC and later GE, but as it's now a name owned by
    > >>Indesit/Merloni, they might not have any manufacturing here
    > >>anymore (I don't know).

    >
    > > Apparently Hoover have recently closed their washing machine plant in
    > > Wales. Not that their recent machines have been any good at all...

    >
    > Just found that Indesit (Hotpoint) are in the middle of closing
    > their washing machine factory in Wales...http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/7921557.stm
    >
    > The Peterborough factory (fridge/freezers) closed last year.
    >
    > Look like we just can't make anything, sigh.
    >
    > > Anyone else remember the Rolls washing machine? Wasn't that made in
    > > England?

    >
    > --
    > Andrew Gabriel
    > [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]


    What make will you be looking at now?

    Miele?
    David, May 26, 2009
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    David <> writes:

    > What make will you be looking at now?
    > Miele?


    Don't know. I've been very happy with the Hotpoint I've got, which
    is 23 years old now. It was top of their range when I bought it.
    It was about 16 years before anything went wrong, but I've repaired
    all problems with it myself -- Hotpoint spares are easily available
    and very cheap. It has very well designed wash programmes -- I have
    seen a number of other machines (by no means all), but I've not seen
    anything as well thought through. (I did have a few chats with some
    of their design engineers over lunch in the GEC staff canteen, and
    I found it interesting to know what they were designing the machine
    to do at various points in the cycle.)

    So I guess DIY servicability, availability of spares at reasonable
    prices, and well designed programming would be what I'd look for
    in a manufacturer. (e.g. not one which uses drums with no replacable
    bearings or seals, so the machine is virtually written off when some
    £3 part wears out, which seems to be becoming more common.
    Unfortunately, this detail is not on the product data sheets;-)

    For the model, I'd be looking for: fast spin, no tumble drier,
    5kg (or more) load, half/reduced load option, delayed start.
    Ability to remember programmes you create also a plus.

    I guess with Hotpoint being just a brand of Meloni now, and the Wales
    factory closing, it's questionable if Hotpoint today really has any
    connections with the Hotpoint I have. If they were still made in the
    UK, I would probably go for the Hotpoint WMD 960, but as they aren't,
    I'll browse other manufacturer's models too, but may still go for the
    Hotpoint.

    The other possibility is to repair the Hotpoint I've got. It needs
    a new outer drum at just over £100 -- it's a question of if it's
    worth £100+ to mend a 23 year old machine. If it went for another
    5 years, then probably yes. If some part died a few months later for
    which there are no more spares (such as the motor), then it was just
    money and effort down the drain.

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
    Andrew Gabriel, May 26, 2009
    #4
  5. Andrew Gabriel

    Appin Guest

    The message <4a1c2902$0$512$>
    from (Andrew Gabriel) contains these words:

    > In article
    > <>,
    > David <> writes:


    > > What make will you be looking at now?
    > > Miele?


    > Don't know. I've been very happy with the Hotpoint I've got, which
    > is 23 years old now. It was top of their range when I bought it.
    > It was about 16 years before anything went wrong, but I've repaired
    > all problems with it myself -- Hotpoint spares are easily available
    > and very cheap. It has very well designed wash programmes -- I have
    > seen a number of other machines (by no means all), but I've not seen
    > anything as well thought through. (I did have a few chats with some
    > of their design engineers over lunch in the GEC staff canteen, and
    > I found it interesting to know what they were designing the machine
    > to do at various points in the cycle.)


    > So I guess DIY servicability, availability of spares at reasonable
    > prices, and well designed programming would be what I'd look for
    > in a manufacturer. (e.g. not one which uses drums with no replacable
    > bearings or seals, so the machine is virtually written off when some
    > £3 part wears out, which seems to be becoming more common.
    > Unfortunately, this detail is not on the product data sheets;-)


    > For the model, I'd be looking for: fast spin, no tumble drier,
    > 5kg (or more) load, half/reduced load option, delayed start.
    > Ability to remember programmes you create also a plus.


    > I guess with Hotpoint being just a brand of Meloni now, and the Wales
    > factory closing, it's questionable if Hotpoint today really has any
    > connections with the Hotpoint I have. If they were still made in the
    > UK, I would probably go for the Hotpoint WMD 960, but as they aren't,
    > I'll browse other manufacturer's models too, but may still go for the
    > Hotpoint.


    > The other possibility is to repair the Hotpoint I've got. It needs
    > a new outer drum at just over £100 -- it's a question of if it's
    > worth £100+ to mend a 23 year old machine. If it went for another
    > 5 years, then probably yes. If some part died a few months later for
    > which there are no more spares (such as the motor), then it was just
    > money and effort down the drain.


    Have you considered
    http://www.iseappliances.co.uk/ ?

    Specced in this country and built, if I understand correctly, by
    Asko-Asea in Sweden. Had an Asko dishwasher for many years -- no
    complaints. The better ISE machines have a 10-year parts and labour
    warranty. They sell machines under £500 with a 5-year parts and labour
    warranty.
    Appin, May 27, 2009
    #5
  6. Andrew Gabriel

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "Peter Parry" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 26 May 2009 17:38:10 GMT, (Andrew
    > Gabriel) wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>So I guess DIY servicability, availability of spares at reasonable
    >>prices, and well designed programming would be what I'd look for
    >>in a manufacturer. (e.g. not one which uses drums with no replacable
    >>bearings or seals, so the machine is virtually written off when some
    >>£3 part wears out, which seems to be becoming more common.
    >>Unfortunately, this detail is not on the product data sheets;-)

    >
    > No idea what they are like or cost but http://www.iseappliances.co.uk
    > claim to be designed for reparability.


    £782 for a washer with 10 year warranty - not made in UK but fulfils the
    repairability criteria above (or seems to)


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)>
    >
    Bob Mannix, May 27, 2009
    #6
  7. In article <gvjgpb$g1k$>,
    "Bob Mannix" <> writes:
    >
    > "Peter Parry" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> On 26 May 2009 17:38:10 GMT, (Andrew
    >> Gabriel) wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>So I guess DIY servicability, availability of spares at reasonable
    >>>prices, and well designed programming would be what I'd look for
    >>>in a manufacturer. (e.g. not one which uses drums with no replacable
    >>>bearings or seals, so the machine is virtually written off when some
    >>>£3 part wears out, which seems to be becoming more common.
    >>>Unfortunately, this detail is not on the product data sheets;-)

    >>
    >> No idea what they are like or cost but http://www.iseappliances.co.uk
    >> claim to be designed for reparability.

    >
    > £782 for a washer with 10 year warranty - not made in UK but fulfils the
    > repairability criteria above (or seems to)


    Except there only seem to be about 4 spare parts available, probably
    because they think everything else will be a guarantee repair so you
    couldn't need any parts.

    So it's about 3 times the price of a Hotpoint, as insurance for no
    repairs in 10 years. Well, my Hotpoint had no repairs in 16 years,
    so that's maybe not such a good deal. If it lasts 20 years, I could
    actually not repair, but completely replace the Hotpoint 3 times,
    and still not lose. It looks like a nice machine, but even so, it's
    extremely difficult to justify the price tag. The reason for DIY
    servicability is to keep the lifetime price down, but with such a
    loading up front, you've lost before you even start.

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
    Andrew Gabriel, May 27, 2009
    #7
  8. Andrew Gabriel

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "Andrew Gabriel" <> wrote in message
    news:4a1d4d15$0$512$...
    > In article <gvjgpb$g1k$>,
    > "Bob Mannix" <> writes:
    >>
    >> "Peter Parry" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> On 26 May 2009 17:38:10 GMT, (Andrew
    >>> Gabriel) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>So I guess DIY servicability, availability of spares at reasonable
    >>>>prices, and well designed programming would be what I'd look for
    >>>>in a manufacturer. (e.g. not one which uses drums with no replacable
    >>>>bearings or seals, so the machine is virtually written off when some
    >>>>£3 part wears out, which seems to be becoming more common.
    >>>>Unfortunately, this detail is not on the product data sheets;-)
    >>>
    >>> No idea what they are like or cost but http://www.iseappliances.co.uk
    >>> claim to be designed for reparability.

    >>
    >> £782 for a washer with 10 year warranty - not made in UK but fulfils the
    >> repairability criteria above (or seems to)

    >
    > Except there only seem to be about 4 spare parts available, probably
    > because they think everything else will be a guarantee repair so you
    > couldn't need any parts.
    >
    > So it's about 3 times the price of a Hotpoint, as insurance for no
    > repairs in 10 years. Well, my Hotpoint had no repairs in 16 years,
    > so that's maybe not such a good deal. If it lasts 20 years, I could
    > actually not repair, but completely replace the Hotpoint 3 times,
    > and still not lose. It looks like a nice machine, but even so, it's
    > extremely difficult to justify the price tag. The reason for DIY
    > servicability is to keep the lifetime price down, but with such a
    > loading up front, you've lost before you even start.


    I tend to agree. We bought a Beko for £199 which has been faultless so far
    (2years). Another 6 months and it's cheaper to just keep buying cheap Bekos
    (if not very environmentally friendly) except that it will probably go on
    longer than that.


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
    > --
    > Andrew Gabriel
    > [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
    Bob Mannix, May 27, 2009
    #8
  9. Andrew Gabriel

    Jules Guest

    On Tue, 26 May 2009 17:38:10 +0000, Andrew Gabriel wrote:
    > The other possibility is to repair the Hotpoint I've got. It needs
    > a new outer drum at just over £100 -- it's a question of if it's
    > worth £100+ to mend a 23 year old machine. If it went for another
    > 5 years, then probably yes. If some part died a few months later for
    > which there are no more spares (such as the motor), then it was just
    > money and effort down the drain.


    Silly question, but can't you just buy another identical Hotpoint
    second-hand? Either take the risk that it will be less worn, or cobble
    together the best machine you can using parts from both, or - if you have
    space - keep both machines around with one as a spares source for the
    other as/when needed.

    That hinges on finding an identical one, I suppose (I'm blessed with
    washing machine technology here in the US which hasn't really progressed
    in a good 40 years - which at least means that parts are very easy to come
    by!)

    cheers

    Jules
    Jules, May 27, 2009
    #9
  10. Andrew Gabriel

    Guest

    £800 with 10yr warranty is WAY too much front loading :)
    Last summer you could scrape a Miele 5yr at 450, 10yr at 620.

    Better to wait for the "free 5yr warranty" on midrange.
    - Siemens 488 at JL with 5yr warranty (or used to be)
    - Stick 312 in 5.2% ISA AAA bond fund at 5yrs = 402 (buys another)
    - Stick 312 in 5.2% ISA AAA bond fund at 7yrs = 445
    - Stick 312 in 5.2% ISA AAA bond fund at 10yrs = 518 (buys another)

    You could instead stick £312 in a loony stock fund (BRIC).
    - In which case you MIGHT get 160 312 650 back at 10yrs

    Siemens/Bosch W/M pumps are cheap.
    However things like a motor will write the machine off, and a door
    gasket or such is probably 2-3 times that of a Hotpoint.

    Self insurance is worthwhile on many things, except Laptops & TVs due
    to parts cost or design faults (T4x R5x X4x ATI BGA failure spring to
    mind, trying to get replies on "what Type or graphics chipset is it?"
    is hilarious from T43 sellers on Ebay, like asking an MP about
    expenses up until this year).
    , May 27, 2009
    #10
  11. Andrew Gabriel

    Tim S Guest

    Mark coughed up some electrons that declared:

    > This is what you get in our "throw-away" society. It's cheaper to
    > throw away and replace than repair. I'd rather a w/m that lasts a
    > long time and not have to suffer SWMBO moaning at me to fix it or
    > replace it every couple of years.
    >


    My sentiments too. This is definately a Miele moment. Incidentally, I have a
    Miele washer - bottom-ish end, comparable features to a top end Bosch (my
    other choice). The other benefit to me is it washes *better* than any other
    machine I've ever had, doesn't shake itself all over the room (full of cast
    iron drum weights, no cheap concrete for them). Seems to take reasonable
    levels of abuse too.

    Cheers

    Tim
    Tim S, May 28, 2009
    #11
  12. We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
    drugs began to take hold. I remember (Andrew
    Gabriel) saying something like:

    >Anyone know if any of the washing machine manufacturers still make
    >any of them in the UK?


    Electrolux is still alive and kicking in Luton, and has been for
    decades.
    http://www.electrolux.com/eoutlet/uk/index.aspx
    Ok, the profits go back to Sweden, but at least it's keeping jobs in the
    UK.
    Grimly Curmudgeon, May 29, 2009
    #12
  13. Grimly Curmudgeon wrote:
    > We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
    > drugs began to take hold. I remember (Andrew
    > Gabriel) saying something like:
    >
    >> Anyone know if any of the washing machine manufacturers still make
    >> any of them in the UK?

    >
    > Electrolux is still alive and kicking in Luton, and has been for
    > decades.
    > http://www.electrolux.com/eoutlet/uk/index.aspx
    > Ok, the profits go back to Sweden, but at least it's keeping jobs in the
    > UK.

    And NOTHING sucks, like an electrolux..
    The Natural Philosopher, May 29, 2009
    #13
  14. Andrew Gabriel

    Bob Mannix Guest

    "Grimly Curmudgeon" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
    > drugs began to take hold. I remember (Andrew
    > Gabriel) saying something like:
    >
    >>Anyone know if any of the washing machine manufacturers still make
    >>any of them in the UK?

    >
    > Electrolux is still alive and kicking in Luton, and has been for
    > decades.
    > http://www.electrolux.com/eoutlet/uk/index.aspx
    > Ok, the profits go back to Sweden, but at least it's keeping jobs in the
    > UK.


    They haven't *made* anything there for many years as they moved all the
    manufacture to "low cost countries". I suppose you are keeping the office
    staff there in a job by buying Electrolux.


    --
    Bob Mannix
    (anti-spam is as easy as 1-2-3 - not)
    Bob Mannix, May 29, 2009
    #14
  15. We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
    drugs began to take hold. I remember "Bob Mannix" <>
    saying something like:

    >> Electrolux is still alive and kicking in Luton, and has been for
    >> decades.
    >> http://www.electrolux.com/eoutlet/uk/index.aspx
    >> Ok, the profits go back to Sweden, but at least it's keeping jobs in the
    >> UK.

    >
    >They haven't *made* anything there for many years as they moved all the
    >manufacture to "low cost countries". I suppose you are keeping the office
    >staff there in a job by buying Electrolux.


    Oh bugger. So, there's just warehousemen and paper-pushers there, now.
    I used to have a connection with the place and I must say I'm a bit
    disappointed.

    Is anything still made in the UK?
    Grimly Curmudgeon, May 29, 2009
    #15
  16. Andrew Gabriel

    Tim S Guest

    Grimly Curmudgeon coughed up some electrons that declared:

    > Is anything still made in the UK?


    Crap management decisions.



    In fact we lead the world...
    Tim S, May 29, 2009
    #16
  17. In article <>,
    Grimly Curmudgeon <> writes:
    > We were somewhere around Barstow, on the edge of the desert, when the
    > drugs began to take hold. I remember "Bob Mannix" <>
    > saying something like:
    >
    >>> Electrolux is still alive and kicking in Luton, and has been for
    >>> decades.
    >>> http://www.electrolux.com/eoutlet/uk/index.aspx
    >>> Ok, the profits go back to Sweden, but at least it's keeping jobs in the
    >>> UK.

    >>
    >>They haven't *made* anything there for many years as they moved all the
    >>manufacture to "low cost countries". I suppose you are keeping the office
    >>staff there in a job by buying Electrolux.

    >
    > Oh bugger. So, there's just warehousemen and paper-pushers there, now.
    > I used to have a connection with the place and I must say I'm a bit
    > disappointed.


    I was working in that area through the 1980's and early 1990's
    and I remember the Electrolux factory closing sometime during
    that period, although I can't put a date on it, I think it was
    1980's. When I first moved in to the area, I remember
    Electrolux and other local large factories being on the regular
    road direction signs, which I hadn't seen before, but it wasn't
    long before they all pointed to empty factories.

    > Is anything still made in the UK?


    Not if it involves people -- too many other countries to do
    that sort of work much cheaper.

    --
    Andrew Gabriel
    [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]
    Andrew Gabriel, May 29, 2009
    #17
  18. Andrew Gabriel

    Guest Guest

    On 27 May,
    Jules <> wrote:

    > Silly question, but can't you just buy another identical Hotpoint
    > second-hand? Either take the risk that it will be less worn, or cobble
    > together the best machine you can using parts from both, or - if you have
    > space - keep both machines around with one as a spares source for the
    > other as/when needed.


    I currently have a Hotpoint Microtronic that is at least 25 years old. It was
    replaced by an expensive AEG which was a long service gift at work. The AEG
    was thrown out about two years ago, as it was too difficult to maintain due
    to spares availability (controller and switches on last legs after several
    repairs. This has now been replaced by a Miele after only 16 years use.

    The Hotpoint remains in (almost) daily use as a spare machine, and was a bit
    funny on spinning for a while, until I realised the concrete weight had
    disintegrated. This was replaced by weight made from scrap lead sheet
    sandwiched between ply, and is now spinning better than new. It has had
    numerous brushes, the odd belt (1?) and the drum bearings were replaced under
    warranty (over christmas when we had young twins in cloth nappies and no
    machine -- hence having a spare since) and again a year or so ago.

    It is working well, has spares available and looks like going on for some
    time. It is used 50% of the time, until recently quite heavily. Altogether a
    long lasting, reliable machine.

    --
    B Thumbs
    Change lycos to yahoo to reply
    Guest, May 30, 2009
    #18
  19. Andrew Gabriel

    Huge Guest

    On 2009-05-28, Tim S <> wrote:
    > Mark coughed up some electrons that declared:
    >
    >> This is what you get in our "throw-away" society. It's cheaper to
    >> throw away and replace than repair. I'd rather a w/m that lasts a
    >> long time and not have to suffer SWMBO moaning at me to fix it or
    >> replace it every couple of years.
    >>

    >
    > My sentiments too. This is definately a Miele moment.


    Our 8 y/o Miele packed up last week. Turned out to be our fault (for
    not cleaning it out often enough - the water level sensor was full of
    gunge). But what impressed me (as I watched the mender chappie) was that
    (i) the front opens on a hinge, so it doesn't need to be removed from
    under the countertop, or tipped up, (ii) that it can be run with the
    front open, so faults can be seen happening & (iii) there's a wiring
    diagram clipped on the front of the machine!

    --
    http://hyperangry.blogspot.com/
    [email me, if you must, at huge {at} huge (dot) org <dot> uk]
    Huge, May 31, 2009
    #19
  20. Andrew Gabriel

    Huge Guest

    On 2009-05-30, Edward W Thompson <> wrote:


    >>> Is anything still made in the UK?

    >>
    >>Not if it involves people -- too many other countries to do
    >>that sort of work much cheaper.

    >
    > and, with regret, much better! British 'industry' just could not
    > compete either on price or quality in manufacturing, with certain
    > exceptions. We concentrated on the 'financial services industry' and
    > have proven not to be too good at that either :). Depressing!


    It would be depressing if it were true. In fact, the UK is the world's
    11th largest exporting nation in absolute terms, 31st in GDP per capita
    (3 places *above* Germany), 8th largest GDP (in purchasing parity) -
    one above Russia and the second largest in the EU (one place behind
    Germany), the 20th largest oil producer (two places above Qatar), and
    so on.

    (All figures from the CIA World factbook.)

    --
    http://hyperangry.blogspot.com/
    [email me, if you must, at huge {at} huge (dot) org <dot> uk
    Huge, May 31, 2009
    #20

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