tumble dryer dehumidifiers

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by paulparkie, Jul 4, 2004.

  1. paulparkie

    paulparkie Guest

    Okay, so I have just recently moved into a new appartment - and this
    means that I can't have my hose vent from my tumble dryer going
    outside.

    I've managed to get my hands on a condenser box, which you just attach
    the vent pipe to and hey presto it's supposed to collect the water.

    However, it dosen't seem to work - now granted I didn't get it from
    new so I haven't got the instructions, but I've tried adding a bit of
    cold water in the hope that that will aid the condensing - but that
    hasn't worked either - I just end up with a very steamy room.

    Any suggestions?
    paulparkie, Jul 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. paulparkie

    Lurch Guest

    On 4 Jul 2004 08:55:30 -0700, (paulparkie)
    strung together this:

    >Any suggestions?


    Throe that useless contraption out of the window and go and buy a
    proper condenser dryer. If you want it to work that's about your only
    option.
    --

    SJW
    A.C.S. Ltd
    Lurch, Jul 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. paulparkie

    Chris Hodges Guest

    paulparkie wrote:
    > Okay, so I have just recently moved into a new appartment - and this
    > means that I can't have my hose vent from my tumble dryer going
    > outside.
    >
    > I've managed to get my hands on a condenser box, which you just attach
    > the vent pipe to and hey presto it's supposed to collect the water.
    >
    > However, it dosen't seem to work - now granted I didn't get it from
    > new so I haven't got the instructions, but I've tried adding a bit of
    > cold water in the hope that that will aid the condensing - but that
    > hasn't worked either - I just end up with a very steamy room.
    >
    > Any suggestions?


    I've never used one but:
    - They seem to come with ice packs that you put in the freezer overnight
    before use.
    - They're not supposed to be much good.

    --
    Chris
    -----
    Spamtrap in force: to email replace 127.0.0.1 with blueyonder.co.uk
    Chris Hodges, Jul 4, 2004
    #3
  4. paulparkie

    Ian Stirling Guest

    Chris Hodges <chris_hodges@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > paulparkie wrote:
    >> Okay, so I have just recently moved into a new appartment - and this
    >> means that I can't have my hose vent from my tumble dryer going
    >> outside.
    >>
    >> I've managed to get my hands on a condenser box, which you just attach
    >> the vent pipe to and hey presto it's supposed to collect the water.
    >>
    >> However, it dosen't seem to work - now granted I didn't get it from
    >> new so I haven't got the instructions, but I've tried adding a bit of
    >> cold water in the hope that that will aid the condensing - but that
    >> hasn't worked either - I just end up with a very steamy room.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions?

    >
    > I've never used one but:
    > - They seem to come with ice packs that you put in the freezer overnight
    > before use.


    At best - the amount of heat released by water condensing is about
    twice (per kilo) that of ice melting.
    So, you'r at best going to need double the amount of water you remove
    from the clothes.
    To get a "reasonable" result, say 10C output at 100% RH, you are probably
    looking at an ice pack that will absorb around 4Kw (heat added by dryer
    and heat that would be needed to heat the air from 10C-room temp).

    Say the dryer runs for 1 hour, 4Kwh is around 15MJ, so will melt around
    15Kg of ice.
    Ian Stirling, Jul 4, 2004
    #4
  5. paulparkie

    Chris Hodges Guest

    Ian Stirling wrote:
    >>I've never used one but:
    >>- They seem to come with ice packs that you put in the freezer overnight
    >>before use.

    >
    >
    > At best - the amount of heat released by water condensing is about
    > twice (per kilo) that of ice melting.
    > So, you'r at best going to need double the amount of water you remove
    > from the clothes.
    > To get a "reasonable" result, say 10C output at 100% RH, you are probably
    > looking at an ice pack that will absorb around 4Kw (heat added by dryer
    > and heat that would be needed to heat the air from 10C-room temp).
    >
    > Say the dryer runs for 1 hour, 4Kwh is around 15MJ, so will melt around
    > 15Kg of ice.


    In fact it's worse than that - at 273K, latent heat of fusion is
    3.3x10^5 J/kg, latent heat of vapourisation 2.5x10^6 J/kg.

    Also specific heat capacity of liquid water is 4.2x10^3 J/kg/K, of ice
    2.1x10^3 J/kg/K.

    In more detail, and looking at it slightly differently to you, each
    kilogramme of water to be condensed and cooled (from say 60 degC) to
    room temperature (say 20 degC) will release 2.5x10^6 + (4.2x10^3 x 40) =
    2668 kJ (assumes condensation happens at 60). If this is removed by
    heating ice (starting at -15 degC) to 0 degC and then melting it we will
    absorb 361.5 kJ per kilo.

    2668/361.5=7.38

    In other words we would need ~7kg of ice per kilo (~litre) of water
    soaked into the clothes.

    --
    Chris
    -----
    Spamtrap in force: to email replace 127.0.0.1 with blueyonder.co.uk
    Chris Hodges, Jul 5, 2004
    #5
  6. paulparkie

    Ian Stirling Guest

    Chris Hodges <chris_hodges@127.0.0.1> wrote:
    > Ian Stirling wrote:
    >>>I've never used one but:
    >>>- They seem to come with ice packs that you put in the freezer overnight
    >>>before use.

    >>
    >>
    >> At best - the amount of heat released by water condensing is about
    >> twice (per kilo) that of ice melting.
    >> So, you'r at best going to need double the amount of water you remove
    >> from the clothes.
    >> To get a "reasonable" result, say 10C output at 100% RH, you are probably
    >> looking at an ice pack that will absorb around 4Kw (heat added by dryer
    >> and heat that would be needed to heat the air from 10C-room temp).
    >>
    >> Say the dryer runs for 1 hour, 4Kwh is around 15MJ, so will melt around
    >> 15Kg of ice.

    >
    > In fact it's worse than that - at 273K, latent heat of fusion is
    > 3.3x10^5 J/kg, latent heat of vapourisation 2.5x10^6 J/kg.


    Sounds wrong.
    Hmm
    <snip>
    > In other words we would need ~7kg of ice per kilo (~litre) of water
    > soaked into the clothes.


    I think I may have been remembering numbers I was doing for energy
    absorbtion for a block of ice cooled to around 0K.
    For this temperature, the number I remembered of around a megajoule/Kg
    is broadly right.
    However, few people have a freezer that goes anywhere near 0K.
    Ian Stirling, Jul 5, 2004
    #6
  7. paulparkie

    BillV Guest

    "paulparkie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Okay, so I have just recently moved into a new appartment - and this
    > means that I can't have my hose vent from my tumble dryer going
    > outside.
    >
    > I've managed to get my hands on a condenser box, which you just attach
    > the vent pipe to and hey presto it's supposed to collect the water.
    >
    > However, it dosen't seem to work - now granted I didn't get it from
    > new so I haven't got the instructions, but I've tried adding a bit of
    > cold water in the hope that that will aid the condensing - but that
    > hasn't worked either - I just end up with a very steamy room.
    >
    > Any suggestions?

    They don't work. I tried one once and took it back to the shop.
    The assistant told me that they had almost 100% return rate
    BillV, Jul 5, 2004
    #7
  8. paulparkie

    MLeo Guest

    Lurch <> wrote:

    > On 4 Jul 2004 08:55:30 -0700, (paulparkie)
    > strung together this:
    >
    > >Any suggestions?

    >
    > Throe that useless contraption out of the window and go and buy a
    > proper condenser dryer. If you want it to work that's about your only
    > option.
    > --
    >
    > SJW
    > A.C.S. Ltd

    Can anybody recommend a good condenser dryer ?

    many thanks M
    MLeo, Jul 5, 2004
    #8
  9. paulparkie

    Lurch Guest

    On Mon, 5 Jul 2004 22:05:40 +0100, (MLeo) strung
    together this:

    >Can anybody recommend a good condenser dryer ?
    >

    One of the Miele ones, but they're pricey. Bosch are next, then
    Creda\White Knight. There's some others dotted around in the middle
    but you should find one of those suitable.
    --

    SJW
    A.C.S. Ltd
    Lurch, Jul 5, 2004
    #9
  10. paulparkie

    MLeo Guest

    Lurch <> wrote:

    > On Mon, 5 Jul 2004 22:05:40 +0100, (MLeo) strung
    > together this:
    >
    > >Can anybody recommend a good condenser dryer ?
    > >

    > One of the Miele ones, but they're pricey. Bosch are next, then
    > Creda\White Knight. There's some others dotted around in the middle
    > but you should find one of those suitable.

    Thanks

    Do you have any views on a good washer/dryer ?

    Many Thanks M
    MLeo, Jul 6, 2004
    #10
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