Travertine tile for floor?

Discussion in 'Misc DIY' started by LD, Feb 4, 2004.

  1. LD

    LD Guest

    Greetings;
    We would like to put travertine tiles on our bathroom floor, and we
    have the following questions:

    - How strong is it? (It is, after all, full of holes....)
    - Should we fill the holes? With what?
    - How slippery is it?
    - Are there different qualities (grades) of travertine? How to
    judge?
    - Would travertine be a good candidate for electric radiant heating?
    - Any other particulars that we should be aware of?

    TIA

    LD
     
    LD, Feb 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. LD

    Roger Guest


    > - How strong is it? (It is, after all, full of holes....)
    > - Should we fill the holes? With what?
    > - How slippery is it?
    > - Are there different qualities (grades) of travertine? How to
    > judge?
    > - Would travertine be a good candidate for electric radiant heating?
    > - Any other particulars that we should be aware of?


    Not very strong, has to be laid by an expert for full support, to prevent
    cracking. Porous, attracts mould, soft, scratches easily. Basically a
    calcite/gypsum hot spring or cave deposit. I would suggest another material
    for areas that get wet. Travertine can be a beautiful floor, but would
    rather see it in hallways or away from heavy traffic and moisture.
    Have you considered cork? Not a good conductor, for radiant heating, but
    very good for the warm springy feel under bare feet.
    If you go with stone or tile, marble is a bit more durable than travertine,
    and things like granite and gneiss are super hard and waterproof.
     
    Roger, Feb 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. LD

    Andy Hill Guest

    (LD) wrote:
    >Greetings;
    >We would like to put travertine tiles on our bathroom floor, and we
    >have the following questions:
    >
    >- How strong is it? (It is, after all, full of holes....)
    >- Should we fill the holes? With what?
    >- How slippery is it?
    >- Are there different qualities (grades) of travertine? How to
    >judge?
    >- Would travertine be a good candidate for electric radiant heating?
    >- Any other particulars that we should be aware of?
    >

    Typically, you fill the holes with the same grout you're using in between the
    tiles. Travertine is pretty fragile...looks killer on the walls, but I think
    twice about putting it on the bathroom floor. It's as good a candidate as any
    other rock or tile for radiant. As with any natural product, there's infinite
    variation in quality...you really need someone who knows rock to work through
    the possibilities.
     
    Andy Hill, Feb 4, 2004
    #3
  4. LD

    LD Guest

    "Roger" <> wrote in message news:<PmcUb.175959$5V2.876709@attbi_s53>...

    > Have you considered cork? Not a good conductor, for radiant heating, but
    > very good for the warm springy feel under bare feet.


    Cork, mmh? That's worth considering....

    How would cork compare to ceramic tile, in terms of durability?
    Maintainance? Would our pet (a husky) damage it? Would a cork floor
    require an underlayment ? If so, what type? Since cork is a natural
    insulator, should we forget about radiant heating and revert back to
    forced air (which is what we currently have)?

    TIA

    LD
     
    LD, Feb 5, 2004
    #4
  5. LD

    db Guest

    We have travertine in our bathroom/shower walls and floor...love it.
    Holes filled with grout. We use miraclesealants impregnating sealer
    once a year, and it has looked great for 3 years. We get great
    compliments on it, and have had not wear/damage issues at all.

    Andy Hill <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > (LD) wrote:
    > >Greetings;
    > >We would like to put travertine tiles on our bathroom floor, and we
    > >have the following questions:
    > >
    > >- How strong is it? (It is, after all, full of holes....)
    > >- Should we fill the holes? With what?
    > >- How slippery is it?
    > >- Are there different qualities (grades) of travertine? How to
    > >judge?
    > >- Would travertine be a good candidate for electric radiant heating?
    > >- Any other particulars that we should be aware of?
    > >

    > Typically, you fill the holes with the same grout you're using in between the
    > tiles. Travertine is pretty fragile...looks killer on the walls, but I think
    > twice about putting it on the bathroom floor. It's as good a candidate as any
    > other rock or tile for radiant. As with any natural product, there's infinite
    > variation in quality...you really need someone who knows rock to work through
    > the possibilities.
     
    db, Feb 5, 2004
    #5
  6. LD

    LD Guest

    (db) wrote in message news:<>...
    > We have travertine in our bathroom/shower walls and floor...love it.
    > Holes filled with grout. We use miraclesealants impregnating sealer
    > once a year, and it has looked great for 3 years. We get great
    > compliments on it, and have had not wear/damage issues at all.


    DB, yours is the first positive post I got! The fact that you have
    actually *lived* with travertine floors for 3 years with no problems
    is reassuring. What "miraclesealant impregnating sealer" do you use?
    Do you need to strip the floor first? Any and all information you can
    provide me with will be appreciated.

    Thanks.

    LD
     
    LD, Feb 6, 2004
    #6
  7. My coworker has travertine on the floor in her kitchen and living room. It
    looks nice and seems durable enough. If you like it, install it. If you
    don't like it, then don't. Flooring is a legitimate use of travertine.


    Dimitri
     
    D. Gerasimatos, Feb 6, 2004
    #7
  8. LD

    DMHinCO Guest

    (LD) wrote in message
    > What "miraclesealant impregnating sealer" do you use?
    > Do you need to strip the floor first? Any and all information you can
    > provide me with will be appreciated.


    I suppose I should be careful about a commercial posting, but on my
    travertine, I used the product I sell that will prevent stains for AT
    LEAST 15 years and I can use any non-acidic cleaner to clean the stone
    without hurting the seal. It has been around in Australia for 10 years
    and has just come to the United States.

    My neighbor used it on his travertine bathroom floor, travertine
    counter, and travertine shower and he loves it. In reality, it may
    NEVER need to be resealed.

    It is invisible.
     
    DMHinCO, Feb 11, 2004
    #8
  9. LD

    Karin Petz Guest

    Hallo everybody,

    Roger schrieb:
    >>- How strong is it? (It is, after all, full of holes....)
    >>- Should we fill the holes? With what?
    >>- How slippery is it?
    >>- Are there different qualities (grades) of travertine? How to
    >>judge?
    >>- Would travertine be a good candidate for electric radiant heating?
    >>- Any other particulars that we should be aware of?

    >
    >
    > Not very strong, has to be laid by an expert for full support, to prevent
    > cracking. Porous, attracts mould, soft, scratches easily. Basically a
    > calcite/gypsum hot spring or cave deposit. I would suggest another material
    > for areas that get wet. Travertine can be a beautiful floor, but would
    > rather see it in hallways or away from heavy traffic and moisture.
    > Have you considered cork? Not a good conductor, for radiant heating, but
    > very good for the warm springy feel under bare feet.
    > If you go with stone or tile, marble is a bit more durable than travertine,
    > and things like granite and gneiss are super hard and waterproof.
    >
    >


    We choose tiles in "cream" for our house, "Feinsteinzeug" from Cotto
    D´Este (www.cottodeste.it). The tiles are calibrated, which means they
    are cut again after burning for exact fitting. You can place them with
    almost no space between the rows, so it looks similar to real stonefloors.
    We are very happy with that decision.

    Excuse pidging-english

    Karin
     
    Karin Petz, Feb 12, 2004
    #9
  10. LD

    Philip Guest

    LD,

    Do yourself a favor and post this at the forum at
    "www.johnbridge.com". It is a great site where tile experts and DYIers
    share information. I guarantee they will answer all your questions
    (even the dunb ones, I know from experience) about tile and radient
    heat.

    Philip

    (LD) wrote in message news:<>...
    > Greetings;
    > We would like to put travertine tiles on our bathroom floor, and we
    > have the following questions:
    >
    > - How strong is it? (It is, after all, full of holes....)
    > - Should we fill the holes? With what?
    > - How slippery is it?
    > - Are there different qualities (grades) of travertine? How to
    > judge?
    > - Would travertine be a good candidate for electric radiant heating?
    > - Any other particulars that we should be aware of?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > LD
     
    Philip, Feb 13, 2004
    #10
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