timber house extension

Discussion in 'UK DIY' started by Telfmann, Sep 14, 2004.

  1. Telfmann

    Telfmann Guest

    I am hoping to one day build a small bedroom at the rear of our
    house. And was wondering if anyone else has built or is considering a
    extension made out of timber. My house is of conventional
    construction, bricks walls, tiles on the roof ect, and i would like to
    build a one storey extension aprrox 8 x 12', just enough to fit a
    single bed at the far end. I have read about walter segal buildings
    and this seems like a cost effective method, using 4x4 posts, and stud
    walls sheathed in 3/4" plywood. If anyone has any ideas about how to
    add a extra room to there house then please respond to this post.
    Information on structual insulated panels (i.e. can i just buy them
    off the shelf), flat roofing (using a rubber membrane), or foundations
    (would concrete pads be better than a sill plate) would be most
    appreciated.
    Telfmann, Sep 14, 2004
    #1
  2. Telfmann wrote:
    > I am hoping to one day build a small bedroom at the rear of our
    > house. And was wondering if anyone else has built or is considering a
    > extension made out of timber. My house is of conventional
    > construction, bricks walls, tiles on the roof ect, and i would like to
    > build a one storey extension aprrox 8 x 12', just enough to fit a
    > single bed at the far end. I have read about walter segal buildings
    > and this seems like a cost effective method, using 4x4 posts, and stud
    > walls sheathed in 3/4" plywood. If anyone has any ideas about how to
    > add a extra room to there house then please respond to this post.
    > Information on structual insulated panels (i.e. can i just buy them
    > off the shelf), flat roofing (using a rubber membrane), or foundations
    > (would concrete pads be better than a sill plate) would be most
    > appreciated.

    I have seen this done round here extesnively - and teh usual method is
    to build brick /block up to about a foot above damp coure, and do the
    stud/timber frame above that.

    The exterir ply can be carried over down to damp lebvel; and drip beaded
    there.

    Internally unless you use massive wall thickness, there will be a ledge
    below teh sill plate, but hey, its all 'feature'

    You could take the timber down to damp level, but I would be nervous of
    that.

    In my house we used 7" thick walls and filled em with rockwool. 4" for
    internal walls only.

    Breathable membrane over the ply, battens running vertically and metal
    lath rendered over, on top. Airgap between render/lath and ply.

    To tie into existing brickwork is just a question of strapping or even
    screwing to it., Damp proof between studs and existing brick probably a
    good idea.

    Don't like flat rooves meself. Make sure the flashing where it butts
    existing wall is done properly - lead keyed into courses, and laid over
    roofing membrane which should run up wall behind lead etc.

    I am not an architect. Suggest you consult one.
    The Natural Philosopher, Sep 14, 2004
    #2
  3. Telfmann

    John Rumm Guest

    Telfmann wrote:

    > I am hoping to one day build a small bedroom at the rear of our
    > house. And was wondering if anyone else has built or is considering a
    > extension made out of timber. My house is of conventional
    > construction, bricks walls, tiles on the roof ect, and i would like to
    > build a one storey extension aprrox 8 x 12', just enough to fit a
    > single bed at the far end. I have read about walter segal buildings
    > and this seems like a cost effective method, using 4x4 posts, and stud
    > walls sheathed in 3/4" plywood. If anyone has any ideas about how to
    > add a extra room to there house then please respond to this post.
    > Information on structual insulated panels (i.e. can i just buy them
    > off the shelf), flat roofing (using a rubber membrane), or foundations
    > (would concrete pads be better than a sill plate) would be most
    > appreciated.


    No reason why you can't build out of studwork. You can meet the required
    insulation values stipulated in the building regs with thinner walls as
    well.

    You would need foundations just as you would for a blockwork extension.
    The main structure would typically be built with 4x2" on 400mm centres.
    Probably 6x2" for roof timbers (assuming a flat roof). Insulation would
    be with urethane or polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam which is readilly
    available from a variety of sources (common brands include Celotex,
    Kingspan, Ecotherm, Rubberoid etc).

    The outside walls could be 1/2" or 3/4" ply. You could render over the
    top of that.


    --
    Cheers,

    John.

    /=================================================================\
    | Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
    |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
    | John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
    \=================================================================/
    John Rumm, Sep 14, 2004
    #3
  4. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "Telfmann" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am hoping to one day build a small bedroom at the rear of our
    > house. And was wondering if anyone else has built or is considering a
    > extension made out of timber. My house is of conventional
    > construction, bricks walls, tiles on the roof ect, and i would like to
    > build a one storey extension aprrox 8 x 12', just enough to fit a
    > single bed at the far end. I have read about walter segal buildings
    > and this seems like a cost effective method, using 4x4 posts, and stud
    > walls sheathed in 3/4" plywood. If anyone has any ideas about how to
    > add a extra room to there house then please respond to this post.
    > Information on structual insulated panels (i.e. can i just buy them
    > off the shelf), flat roofing (using a rubber membrane), or foundations
    > (would concrete pads be better than a sill plate) would be most
    > appreciated.


    Get the book "Out of the Woods" about the Segal method. Very good, and
    gives the technique in detail. The problem is that you will need a
    structural engineer to do the timber frame calcs for you. Some may do it on
    the side as it is only a small extension. Insulate the floor and walls very
    well. Seal up with silicon.

    SIP panels:

    Look at this book:
    Building with Strucutural Insulated Panels (SIPs): Strength and Energy
    Efficiency Through Structural Panel Construction
    By Michael Morley
    ISBN: 1561583510

    Synopsis
    Structural insulated panels are sandwiches of foam insulation between two
    sheets of fibreboard or plywood, and are used to build walls, roofs and
    floors in all kinds of modern buildings: instead of three components - a
    frame, insulation and sheathing - SIP panels are all three things and come
    ready to install. SIP- constructed buildings are vastly more efficient,
    quicker to build, stronger, quieter and more draught-free than older
    post-war building systems. Taps into a huge and growing self-build market
    which is generally only served by technical books.; Tips and information on
    this highly efficient building material from an expert builder who
    specialises in structural insulated panel construction. Packed with 180
    colour photographs and 40 drawings.; Takes the reader through the entire
    process of building a panel-constructed house, from planning and estimating,
    ordering, storage and handling to construction.

    Some SIP companies:
    http://www.bpac.co.uk
    http://www.sipltd.com
    http://www.vencel.co.uk
    http://www.tekhaus.kingspan.com
    http://www.opstalan.nl
    http://www.redex.nl
    http://www.isobouw.nl
    http://www.vencel.co.uk

    Look at "I" beams:
    http://www.masonite-beams.se

    When you have absorbed much of this come back with more questions. This
    will do for now.
    IMM, Sep 15, 2004
    #4
  5. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "John Rumm" <> wrote in message
    news:4147775d$0$62131$...
    > Telfmann wrote:
    >
    > > I am hoping to one day build a small bedroom at the rear of our
    > > house. And was wondering if anyone else has built or is considering a
    > > extension made out of timber. My house is of conventional
    > > construction, bricks walls, tiles on the roof ect, and i would like to
    > > build a one storey extension aprrox 8 x 12', just enough to fit a
    > > single bed at the far end. I have read about walter segal buildings
    > > and this seems like a cost effective method, using 4x4 posts, and stud
    > > walls sheathed in 3/4" plywood. If anyone has any ideas about how to
    > > add a extra room to there house then please respond to this post.
    > > Information on structual insulated panels (i.e. can i just buy them
    > > off the shelf), flat roofing (using a rubber membrane), or foundations
    > > (would concrete pads be better than a sill plate) would be most
    > > appreciated.

    >
    > No reason why you can't build out of
    > studwork. You can meet the required
    > insulation values stipulated in the building
    > regs with thinner walls as
    > well.
    >
    > You would need foundations just as you
    > would for a blockwork extension.


    No you would not. The Segal method is post and beam with minimal
    foundations. The foundations consist of a 1 metre squ. hole by 1 metre deep
    filled with concrete with a paving slab on top. The post rests on this. Six
    of these is good enough for his extension.

    > The main structure would typically be built with 4x2" on 400mm centres.
    > Probably 6x2" for roof timbers (assuming a flat roof). Insulation would
    > be with urethane or polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam which is readilly
    > available from a variety of sources (common brands include Celotex,
    > Kingspan, Ecotherm, Rubberoid etc).
    >
    > The outside walls could be 1/2" or 3/4" ply. You could render over the
    > top of that.


    See the book Out of The Woods which gives all the choices for Segal.
    http://www.segalselfbuild.co.uk/
    IMM, Sep 15, 2004
    #5
  6. Telfmann

    John Rumm Guest

    IMM wrote:

    >>You would need foundations just as you
    >>would for a blockwork extension.

    >
    >
    > No you would not. The Segal method is post and beam with minimal
    > foundations. The foundations consist of a 1 metre squ. hole by 1 metre deep


    Erm, what exactly are you dissagreeing with? So these these segal blocks
    are not foundations then? Weather you have blocks as you describe, or
    strip/beam fill, you still need foundations!

    Something similar in design to those used on the rest of the property
    might be a good idea as well, if the new structure is to be fixed to the
    existing (the importance will depend on the local soil composition).



    --
    Cheers,

    John.

    /=================================================================\
    | Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
    |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
    | John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
    \=================================================================/
    John Rumm, Sep 15, 2004
    #6
  7. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "John Rumm" <> wrote in message
    news:41478f29$0$62750$...
    > IMM wrote:
    >
    > >>You would need foundations just as you
    > >>would for a blockwork extension.

    > >
    > > No you would not. The Segal method
    > > is post and beam with minimal
    > > foundations. The foundations consist of a
    > > 1 metre squ. hole by 1 metre deep

    >
    > Erm, what exactly are you dissagreeing with?


    A block work extension needs strip foundations. Find out how Segal do it.

    > So these these segal blocks
    > are not foundations then? Weather you have
    > blocks as you describe, or
    > strip/beam fill, you still need foundations!


    You don't say... Six small holes in the ground is very different to strip
    foundations, although strip foundations are a part of the Segal method, in
    its rawest and most basic form Segal has minimal foundations, that any DIYer
    can do, and the rest is none wet trades work making it easy for a good DIYer
    with common sense and power tools to tackle. Complete novices have built
    Segal homes, that is it's attraction. Some very attractive wooden framed
    Segal homes have been built. they are not all low cost homes for low income
    people.

    > Something similar in design to those used on the rest of the property
    > might be a good idea as well, if the new structure is to be fixed to the
    > existing (the importance will depend on the local soil composition).


    Where there is poor soil composition Segal scores. The odd deep hole here
    and there to support a post. is all you need. You can hire a drilling
    machine to drill quite deep onto a hard surface beneath the soil. Segal
    homes are mainly off the ground with any form of cladding you want to blend
    in with anything.

    The only negative aspect of the basic Segal method is elimination of cold
    bridging. Although this can be done at extra expense.
    IMM, Sep 15, 2004
    #7
  8. IMM wrote:

    > "John Rumm" <> wrote in message
    > news:41478f29$0$62750$...
    >
    >>IMM wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>>You would need foundations just as you
    >>>>would for a blockwork extension.
    >>>
    >>>No you would not. The Segal method
    >>>is post and beam with minimal
    >>>foundations. The foundations consist of a
    >>>1 metre squ. hole by 1 metre deep

    >>
    >>Erm, what exactly are you dissagreeing with?

    >
    >
    > A block work extension needs strip foundations. Find out how Segal do it.
    >
    >
    >>So these these segal blocks
    >>are not foundations then? Weather you have
    >>blocks as you describe, or
    >>strip/beam fill, you still need foundations!

    >
    >
    > You don't say... Six small holes in the ground is very different to strip
    > foundations, although strip foundations are a part of the Segal method, in
    > its rawest and most basic form Segal has minimal foundations, that any DIYer
    > can do, and the rest is none wet trades work making it easy for a good DIYer
    > with common sense and power tools to tackle. Complete novices have built
    > Segal homes, that is it's attraction. Some very attractive wooden framed
    > Segal homes have been built. they are not all low cost homes for low income
    > people.
    >


    However the cost is similar. Been through the calcs as to whether to use
    piled or strip foundations. Bugger all difference, but the trades to do
    strip are easier to find, and teh BCO doesn't purse his lips so much.

    Whatever the final answer, having timber work that can be splashed by
    rain is a Bad Idea.
    >
    >>Something similar in design to those used on the rest of the property
    >>might be a good idea as well, if the new structure is to be fixed to the
    >>existing (the importance will depend on the local soil composition).

    >
    >
    > Where there is poor soil composition Segal scores. The odd deep hole here
    > and there to support a post. is all you need. You can hire a drilling
    > machine to drill quite deep onto a hard surface beneath the soil. Segal
    > homes are mainly off the ground with any form of cladding you want to blend
    > in with anything.


    It doesn't actually. To the simple minded it looks cheaper, because its
    just less concrete, but the actual process of making the holes is far
    more complex than a JCB digging a trench.



    >
    > The only negative aspect of the basic Segal method is elimination of cold
    > bridging. Although this can be done at extra expense.
    >
    >
    The Natural Philosopher, Sep 15, 2004
    #8
  9. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "The Natural Philosopher" <> wrote in message
    news:ci9973$ql4$1$...
    > IMM wrote:
    >
    > > "John Rumm" <> wrote in message
    > > news:41478f29$0$62750$...
    > >
    > >>IMM wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>>You would need foundations just as you
    > >>>>would for a blockwork extension.
    > >>>
    > >>>No you would not. The Segal method
    > >>>is post and beam with minimal
    > >>>foundations. The foundations consist of a
    > >>>1 metre squ. hole by 1 metre deep
    > >>
    > >>Erm, what exactly are you dissagreeing with?

    > >
    > > A block work extension needs strip foundations. Find out how Segal do

    it.
    > >
    > >>So these these segal blocks
    > >>are not foundations then? Weather you have
    > >>blocks as you describe, or
    > >>strip/beam fill, you still need foundations!

    > >
    > > You don't say... Six small holes in the ground is very different to

    strip
    > > foundations, although strip foundations are a part of the Segal method,

    in
    > > its rawest and most basic form Segal has minimal foundations, that any

    DIYer
    > > can do, and the rest is none wet trades work making it easy for a good

    DIYer
    > > with common sense and power tools to tackle. Complete novices have

    built
    > > Segal homes, that is it's attraction. Some very attractive wooden

    framed
    > > Segal homes have been built. they are not all low cost homes for low

    income
    > > people.

    >
    > However the cost is similar. Been through the calcs as to whether to use
    > piled or strip foundations.


    If the soil is poor, piled is the only sensible answer.

    > Bugger all difference, but the trades to do
    > strip are easier to find, and teh BCO doesn't
    > purse his lips so much.


    See the Segal site. Any problems with BCOs and they will intervene.

    > Whatever the final answer, having timber
    > work that can be splashed by
    > rain is a Bad Idea.


    You have large roof overhangs to reduce/eliminate rain on the building
    sides, or have jettied upper floors too. Theses were designed specifically
    to keep rain from the sides of wooden buildings many 100s of years ago.
    They look neat too. Having rain off the walls prevents the house from
    cooling. It also keeps the sun off in summer too.

    > >>Something similar in design to those used on the rest of the property
    > >>might be a good idea as well, if the new structure is to be fixed to the
    > >>existing (the importance will depend on the local soil composition).

    > >
    > >
    > > Where there is poor soil composition Segal scores. The odd deep hole

    here
    > > and there to support a post. is all you need. You can hire a drilling
    > > machine to drill quite deep onto a hard surface beneath the soil. Segal
    > > homes are mainly off the ground with any form of cladding you want to

    blend
    > > in with anything.

    >
    > It doesn't actually. To the simple minded it looks cheaper, because its
    > just less concrete, but the actual process of making the holes is far
    > more complex than a JCB digging a trench.


    If the soil is fine, digging by hand, six 1m x 1m holes is not a big thing
    at all.

    > > The only negative aspect of the basic Segal method is elimination of

    cold
    > > bridging. Although this can be done at extra expense.
    IMM, Sep 15, 2004
    #9
  10. Telfmann

    John Rumm Guest

    IMM wrote:


    >>Erm, what exactly are you dissagreeing with?

    >
    >
    > A block work extension needs strip foundations. Find out how Segal do it.


    You miss my point I believe... All I was saying to the OP is that you
    will need foundations of some sort. Just in case he was thinking along
    the lines that using studwork to build the extension was going to free
    him from that requirement. I was not suggesting that Segal or any other
    method was good or bad - each have pros and cons.


    --
    Cheers,

    John.

    /=================================================================\
    | Internode Ltd - http://www.internode.co.uk |
    |-----------------------------------------------------------------|
    | John Rumm - john(at)internode(dot)co(dot)uk |
    \=================================================================/
    John Rumm, Sep 15, 2004
    #10
  11. Telfmann

    Telfmann Guest

    Thanks to everyone who has viewed this post, and especially to the ppl
    who have responded.

    Out of the woods is a great little book, and packed full of
    information and useful ideas, but after weeks looking at the same 2D
    picture of a wall made with 4x4 posts and searching on the internet, i
    decided to buy some american books, which showed practical ways of
    doing things.

    'Timber framing for the rest of us' details exactly how to connect a
    sill plate to a foundation.
    'Practical pole building construction' shows how horizontal timber
    (girders) would attach to posts and allow sheathing to be fastened.

    Its true that most segal buildings you hear about are built on
    foundation pads, but in 'out of the woods' it also describes ataching
    a sill plate to a slab foundation (as mentioned in a post above). I do
    think however that the timber would be better off the ground by a few
    inches, as this would reduce the rain and mud splashing onto it.
    Although self build does not mean 'on the cheap', i hope there is a
    still a place for low income housing for low income families. As not
    everyone can afford or would want to live in a goldfish bowl in the
    middle of a forrest.

    And to increase my chance of getting planning permission, and building
    a sound structure, a architect would likley be needed.
    Of course the idea of just building a shed (a shed you could call
    home) and using that as a play room has also occured to me.
    Telfmann, Sep 15, 2004
    #11
  12. Telfmann

    Telfmann Guest

    "IMM" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > "Telfmann" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > I am hoping to one day build a small bedroom at the rear of our
    > > house. And was wondering if anyone else has built or is considering a
    > > extension made out of timber. My house is of conventional
    > > construction, bricks walls, tiles on the roof ect, and i would like to
    > > build a one storey extension aprrox 8 x 12', just enough to fit a
    > > single bed at the far end. I have read about walter segal buildings
    > > and this seems like a cost effective method, using 4x4 posts, and stud
    > > walls sheathed in 3/4" plywood. If anyone has any ideas about how to
    > > add a extra room to there house then please respond to this post.
    > > Information on structual insulated panels (i.e. can i just buy them
    > > off the shelf), flat roofing (using a rubber membrane), or foundations
    > > (would concrete pads be better than a sill plate) would be most
    > > appreciated.

    >
    > Get the book "Out of the Woods" about the Segal method. Very good, and
    > gives the technique in detail. The problem is that you will need a
    > structural engineer to do the timber frame calcs for you. Some may do it on
    > the side as it is only a small extension. Insulate the floor and walls very
    > well. Seal up with silicon.
    >
    > SIP panels:
    >
    > Look at this book:
    > Building with Strucutural Insulated Panels (SIPs): Strength and Energy
    > Efficiency Through Structural Panel Construction
    > By Michael Morley
    > ISBN: 1561583510
    >
    > Synopsis
    > Structural insulated panels are sandwiches of foam insulation between two
    > sheets of fibreboard or plywood, and are used to build walls, roofs and
    > floors in all kinds of modern buildings: instead of three components - a
    > frame, insulation and sheathing - SIP panels are all three things and come
    > ready to install. SIP- constructed buildings are vastly more efficient,
    > quicker to build, stronger, quieter and more draught-free than older
    > post-war building systems. Taps into a huge and growing self-build market
    > which is generally only served by technical books.; Tips and information on
    > this highly efficient building material from an expert builder who
    > specialises in structural insulated panel construction. Packed with 180
    > colour photographs and 40 drawings.; Takes the reader through the entire
    > process of building a panel-constructed house, from planning and estimating,
    > ordering, storage and handling to construction.
    >
    > Some SIP companies:
    > http://www.bpac.co.uk
    > http://www.sipltd.com
    > http://www.vencel.co.uk
    > http://www.tekhaus.kingspan.com
    > http://www.opstalan.nl
    > http://www.redex.nl
    > http://www.isobouw.nl
    > http://www.vencel.co.uk
    >
    > Look at "I" beams:
    > http://www.masonite-beams.se
    >
    > When you have absorbed much of this come back with more questions. This
    > will do for now.


    Its alot to take it, im working my way through your websites. I agree
    insulating the floor is very important, expecially if it off the
    ground with wind whistling underneath. Role on the day when you can
    buy SIP's from Wickes.
    Telfmann, Sep 15, 2004
    #12
  13. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "Telfmann" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks to everyone who has viewed this post, and especially to the ppl
    > who have responded.
    >
    > Out of the woods is a great little book, and packed full of
    > information and useful ideas, but after weeks looking at the same 2D
    > picture of a wall made with 4x4 posts and searching on the internet, i
    > decided to buy some american books, which showed practical ways of
    > doing things.
    >
    > 'Timber framing for the rest of us' details exactly how to connect a
    > sill plate to a foundation.
    > 'Practical pole building construction' shows how horizontal timber
    > (girders) would attach to posts and allow sheathing to be fastened.
    >
    > Its true that most segal buildings you hear about are built on
    > foundation pads, but in 'out of the woods' it also describes ataching
    > a sill plate to a slab foundation (as mentioned in a post above). I do
    > think however that the timber would be better off the ground by a few
    > inches, as this would reduce the rain and mud splashing onto it.
    > Although self build does not mean 'on the cheap', i hope there is a
    > still a place for low income housing for low income families.


    I have seen a few Segal houses and theyn look good. They look eco.

    > As not
    > everyone can afford or would want to live in a goldfish bowl in the
    > middle of a forrest.
    >
    > And to increase my chance of getting planning permission, and building
    > a sound structure, a architect would likley be needed.


    For a single floor extension? They just want simple drawings and stress
    calcs.

    > Of course the idea of just building a shed (a shed you could call
    > home) and using that as a play room has also occured to me.


    God ones cost 12K, best build Segal.
    IMM, Sep 16, 2004
    #13
  14. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "Telfmann" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "IMM" <> wrote in message

    news:<>...
    > > "Telfmann" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > I am hoping to one day build a small bedroom at the rear of our
    > > > house. And was wondering if anyone else has built or is considering a
    > > > extension made out of timber. My house is of conventional
    > > > construction, bricks walls, tiles on the roof ect, and i would like to
    > > > build a one storey extension aprrox 8 x 12', just enough to fit a
    > > > single bed at the far end. I have read about walter segal buildings
    > > > and this seems like a cost effective method, using 4x4 posts, and stud
    > > > walls sheathed in 3/4" plywood. If anyone has any ideas about how to
    > > > add a extra room to there house then please respond to this post.
    > > > Information on structual insulated panels (i.e. can i just buy them
    > > > off the shelf), flat roofing (using a rubber membrane), or foundations
    > > > (would concrete pads be better than a sill plate) would be most
    > > > appreciated.

    > >
    > > Get the book "Out of the Woods" about the Segal method. Very good, and
    > > gives the technique in detail. The problem is that you will need a
    > > structural engineer to do the timber frame calcs for you. Some may do it

    on
    > > the side as it is only a small extension. Insulate the floor and walls

    very
    > > well. Seal up with silicon.
    > >
    > > SIP panels:
    > >
    > > Look at this book:
    > > Building with Strucutural Insulated Panels (SIPs): Strength and Energy
    > > Efficiency Through Structural Panel Construction
    > > By Michael Morley
    > > ISBN: 1561583510
    > >
    > > Synopsis
    > > Structural insulated panels are sandwiches of foam insulation between

    two
    > > sheets of fibreboard or plywood, and are used to build walls, roofs and
    > > floors in all kinds of modern buildings: instead of three components - a
    > > frame, insulation and sheathing - SIP panels are all three things and

    come
    > > ready to install. SIP- constructed buildings are vastly more efficient,
    > > quicker to build, stronger, quieter and more draught-free than older
    > > post-war building systems. Taps into a huge and growing self-build

    market
    > > which is generally only served by technical books.; Tips and information

    on
    > > this highly efficient building material from an expert builder who
    > > specialises in structural insulated panel construction. Packed with 180
    > > colour photographs and 40 drawings.; Takes the reader through the entire
    > > process of building a panel-constructed house, from planning and

    estimating,
    > > ordering, storage and handling to construction.
    > >
    > > Some SIP companies:
    > > http://www.bpac.co.uk
    > > http://www.sipltd.com
    > > http://www.vencel.co.uk
    > > http://www.tekhaus.kingspan.com
    > > http://www.opstalan.nl
    > > http://www.redex.nl
    > > http://www.isobouw.nl
    > > http://www.vencel.co.uk
    > >
    > > Look at "I" beams:
    > > http://www.masonite-beams.se
    > >
    > > When you have absorbed much of this come back with more questions. This
    > > will do for now.

    >
    > Its alot to take it, im working my way through your websites. I agree
    > insulating the floor is very important, expecially if it off the
    > ground with wind whistling underneath. Role on the day when you can
    > buy SIP's from Wickes.


    In the US you can. They have catalogues of various sizes of panels with
    doors windows already cut in. Just pick and fix and a weatherproof shell up
    in days. AS most of their houses are bungalows and you don't need scaffold
    around the house (exspensive) a couple of men can put the SIPs up in a few
    days, even the roof. SIPs is the way forward without doubt. Total
    elimination of thermal bridging.
    IMM, Sep 16, 2004
    #14
  15. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "Telfmann" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks to everyone who has viewed this post, and especially to the ppl
    > who have responded.
    >
    > Out of the woods is a great little book, and packed full of
    > information and useful ideas, but after weeks looking at the same 2D
    > picture of a wall made with 4x4 posts and searching on the internet, i
    > decided to buy some american books, which showed practical ways of
    > doing things.
    >
    > 'Timber framing for the rest of us' details exactly how to connect a
    > sill plate to a foundation.
    > 'Practical pole building construction' shows how horizontal timber
    > (girders) would attach to posts and allow sheathing to be fastened.


    Do these books go into TJI "I" beams?
    IMM, Sep 16, 2004
    #15
  16. IMM wrote:

    >
    > Do these books go into TJI "I" beams?
    >
    >

    No, just bookcases, John, just bookcases...
    The Natural Philosopher, Sep 16, 2004
    #16
  17. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "The Natural Philosopher" <> wrote in message
    news:cibijj$ln$1$...
    > IMM wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Do these books go into TJI "I" beams?


    A mentalist enters.....

    > No, just bookcases, John, just bookcases...


    Sad isn't it.
    IMM, Sep 16, 2004
    #17
  18. Telfmann

    Telfmann Guest

    The Natural Philosopher <> wrote in message news:<cibijj$ln$1$>...
    > IMM wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Do these books go into TJI "I" beams?
    > >
    > >

    > No, just bookcases, John, just bookcases...


    they also go into I-beams, as there is a handy shelf provided in the
    middle of them, along the lines of the handy pop out beverage holder
    that comes with a pc.

    Unfortuanalty they don't discuss I-beams within the book, 'practcal
    pole construction' is from the 80's, but does have great info on
    loading poles, how to increaase loading on a post from 3 tons to 16
    tons, by using spiked connectors instead on nail (nails, lol) or bolts
    (6 tons). Although the book deals with telephone poles ect stuck into
    the ground, alot of the other info is relevant for hanging walls off
    posts.
    'Timber framing for the rest of us' is a 2004 book but is mainly about
    connecting large dimensional lumber (8"x8") with joist hangers and
    toe-screwing, to sill plates and posts on a dpc. Such large timbers
    are used because the aurthor likes turf roofs, but he also mentions
    'out of the woods'. I-beams would be a great alternative to using
    large timber in this situation, but does not mention it in this book,
    however there are very detailed step by step guides and span charts.
    Telfmann, Sep 17, 2004
    #18
  19. Telfmann

    IMM Guest

    "Telfmann" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The Natural Philosopher <> wrote in message

    news:<cibijj$ln$1$>...
    > > IMM wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > > > Do these books go into TJI "I" beams?
    > > >
    > > >

    > > No, just bookcases, John, just bookcases...

    >
    > they also go into I-beams, as there is a handy shelf provided in the
    > middle of them, along the lines of the handy pop out beverage holder
    > that comes with a pc.
    >
    > Unfortuanalty they don't discuss I-beams within the book, 'practcal
    > pole construction' is from the 80's, but does have great info on
    > loading poles, how to increaase loading on a post from 3 tons to 16
    > tons, by using spiked connectors instead on nail (nails, lol) or bolts
    > (6 tons). Although the book deals with telephone poles ect stuck into
    > the ground, alot of the other info is relevant for hanging walls off
    > posts.
    > 'Timber framing for the rest of us' is a 2004 book but is mainly about
    > connecting large dimensional lumber (8"x8") with joist hangers and
    > toe-screwing, to sill plates and posts on a dpc. Such large timbers
    > are used because the aurthor likes turf roofs, but he also mentions
    > 'out of the woods'. I-beams would be a great alternative to using
    > large timber in this situation, but does not mention it in this book,
    > however there are very detailed step by step guides and span charts.


    There must a book out there that covers TJI "I" beams and normal cut timber.
    TJI's are now even common in the UK. Five years ago people scorned these as
    ticky tacky. Now they are mainstream. The Brits are slow learners.

    Maybe the TJI makers can recommend a book.
    IMM, Sep 17, 2004
    #19
  20. Telfmann

    Telfmann Guest

    "IMM" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > "Telfmann" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > The Natural Philosopher <> wrote in message

    > news:<cibijj$ln$1$>...
    > > > IMM wrote:
    > > >
    > > > >
    > > > > Do these books go into TJI "I" beams?
    > > > >
    > > > >
    > > > No, just bookcases, John, just bookcases...

    > >
    > > they also go into I-beams, as there is a handy shelf provided in the
    > > middle of them, along the lines of the handy pop out beverage holder
    > > that comes with a pc.
    > >
    > > Unfortuanalty they don't discuss I-beams within the book, 'practcal
    > > pole construction' is from the 80's, but does have great info on
    > > loading poles, how to increaase loading on a post from 3 tons to 16
    > > tons, by using spiked connectors instead on nail (nails, lol) or bolts
    > > (6 tons). Although the book deals with telephone poles ect stuck into
    > > the ground, alot of the other info is relevant for hanging walls off
    > > posts.
    > > 'Timber framing for the rest of us' is a 2004 book but is mainly about
    > > connecting large dimensional lumber (8"x8") with joist hangers and
    > > toe-screwing, to sill plates and posts on a dpc. Such large timbers
    > > are used because the aurthor likes turf roofs, but he also mentions
    > > 'out of the woods'. I-beams would be a great alternative to using
    > > large timber in this situation, but does not mention it in this book,
    > > however there are very detailed step by step guides and span charts.

    >
    > There must a book out there that covers TJI "I" beams and normal cut timber.
    > TJI's are now even common in the UK. Five years ago people scorned these as
    > ticky tacky. Now they are mainstream. The Brits are slow learners.
    > Maybe the TJI makers can recommend a book.


    Its true that the british never seem to take up a good idea quickly,
    the bluestreak rocket, tilting trains, the digital computer (or
    mechanical for that matter), but alot of american households don't
    have a electic kettle, how do they manage.
    Telfmann, Sep 17, 2004
    #20

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